Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature on economy - markets and traders

Africa OverviewAngolaBenin
BotswanaBurkina FasoBurundi
CameroonCentral African RepublicChad
D.R. Congo / ZaireDjiboutiEquatorial Guinea
EritreaEthiopiaGabon
GambiaGhanaGuinea
Guinea BisseauIvory CoastKenya
LesothoLiberiaMadagascar
MalawiMaliMauritius
MozambiqueNamibiaNiger
NigeriaRwandaSenegal
Sierra LeoneSomaliaSouth Africa
South SudanSudanSwaziland / Eswatini
TanzaniaThe CongoTogo
UgandaZambiaZimbabwe

Africa Overview

Robson, Elsbeth (1999): Gender, markets and fieldwork in developing countries, with special reference to West Africa, in: Harris-White, Barbara (ed.): Agricultural markets – from theory to practice, Field Experience in developing countries, St. Martin’s Press, New York, pp. 287-301. [2100]

Seligmann, Linda (ed.) (2001): Women traders in cross-cultural perspective, Mediating identities, marketing wares, Stanford University Press, Stanford. [2101]

Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.) (1996): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder,. [2102]

Simms, Ruth (1985): The African women as entrepreneur: Problems and perspectives on their roles, in Steady, F.Ch. (ed.): Black women cross-culturally, Cambridge (Mass.), pp. 141-168. [2103]


Angola

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Benin

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Botswana

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Burkina Faso

Freidberg, Susanne (1996): Tradewomen and businesswomen, The social relations of contract gardening in Southwestern Burkina Faso, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 137-176. [2104]


Burundi

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Cameroon

Ajonina, P.U. / Ajonina, G.N. et al. (2005): Gender roles and economics of exploitation, Processing and marketing of bivalves and impacts on forest resources in the Sanaga Delta Region of Douala-Edea Wildlife Reserve, Cameroon, in: International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 161-172. [2105]

Fonchingong, Charles (2005): Negotiating livelihoods beyond Beijing: The burden of women food vendors in the informal economy of Limbe, Cameroon, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 57, no. 184, pp. 243-253. [2106]

Krieger, Judith (1995): Rural women, urban food, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 89-109. [2107]

Krieger, Judith (2000): Entrepreneurs and women’s well-being, Women’s agricultural and trading strategies in Cameroon, in: Spring, Anita (Hg.): Small scale farmers and commercial ventures, Increasing food security in developing countries, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp. 233-251. [2108]

Ruiz Perez, Manuel / NDoye, Ousseynou et al. (2002): A gender analysis of forest product markets in Cameroon, in: Africa Today, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 97-126. [2109]


Central African Republic

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Chad

no entries to this combination of country and topic


D.R. Congo / Zaire

Braun, Lesley Nicole (2019): Wandering women, The work of Congolese transnational traders, in: Africa, vol. 89, no. 2, pp. 378-396. [11660]

Braun, Lesley Nicole / Ostbo Haugen, Heidi (2021): The weight women carry, Research on the visible and invisible baggage in suitcase trade between China and Africa, in: The Professional Geographer, online. 13.9.2021 [11661]

De Herst, Tom / Marysse, Stephan (1989): The reinventry of the market from below - The end of women’s money and changing monopoly in Kinshasa, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 26, no. 8, pp. 239-254. [2110]

Schoepf, Brooke /, Walu, Engundu (1991): Women’s trade and contributions to household budgets in Kinshasa, in: Mac Gaffey, J. (ed.): The real economy of Zaire, James Currey Publishing, London, pp. 124-151. [2111]


Djibouti

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Equatorial Guinea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Eritrea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Ethiopia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Gabon

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Gambia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Ghana

Bortei-Doku, Ellen / Aryeetey, Ernest (1996): Mobilizing cash for business: Women in rotating susu clubs in Ghana, in: Ardener, Shirley / Burman, Sandra (eds.): Money go rounds, The importance of rotating saving and credit associations for women, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 77-94. [2112]

Chalfin, Brenda (2000): Risky business: Economic uncertainty, market reforms and female livelihoods in Northeast Ghana, in: Development and Change, vol. 31, pp. 987-1008. [2113]

Clark, Gracia (1988): Price control of local food stuffs in Kumasi, Ghana, 1979, in: Clark, Gracia (ed.): Traders versus the state, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 57-79. [2114]

Clark, Gracia (1989): Money, sex and cooking: Manipulation of the paid/unpaid boundary by Asante market women, in: Rutz, Henry / Orlove, Benjamin (eds.): The social economy of consumption, University Press of America, Lanham, pp. 323-346. [2115]

Clark, Gracia (1989): Separation between trading and home for Asante women in Kumasi central market, Ghana, in: Wilk, Richard (ed.): The household economy, Reconsidering the domestic mode of production, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 91-118. [2116]

Clark, Gracia (1991): Food traders and food security in Ghana, in: Downs, R.E. et al. (ed.): The political economy of African famine, Gordon and Breach Publishers, Philadelphia, pp. 227-256. [2117]

Clark, Gracia (1991): Collegues and customers in unstable market conditions, Kumasi, Ghana, in: Ethnology, vol. 30, pp. 31-48. [2118]

Clark, Gracia (1991): Women traders in Ghana and the structural adjustment program, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 217-236. [2119]

Clark, Gracia (1994): Onions are my husband, Survival and accumulation by West-African market women, University of Chicago Press, Chicago. [2120]

Clark, Gracia (1997): Market Queens: Innovation within Akan tradition, in: Kaplan, Flora E.S. (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, priestesses, and power: Case studies in African gender, Publications of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 173-201. [2121]

Clark, Gracia (2000): Mothering, work and gender in urban Asante ideology and practice, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 101, no. 4, pp. 717-729. [2122]

Clark, Gracia (2000): Small scale traders’ key role in stabilizing and diversifying Ghana’s rural communities and livelihoods, in: Spring, Anita (ed.): Small scale farmers and commercial ventures, Increasing food security in developing countries, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp. 253-270. [2123]

Clark, Gracia (2001): Gender and profiteering, Ghana’s market women as devoted mothers and “human vampire bats”, in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 293-311. [2124]

Clark, Gracia (2001): ‘Nursing-mother work’ in Ghana, Power and frustration in Akan market women’s lives, in: Seligman, Linda (ed.): Women traders in cross-cultural perspective, Mediating identities, marketing wares, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 103-126. [2125]

Clark, Gracia (2010): Gender fiction and gender tensions involving “traditional” Asante market women, in: African Studies Quarterly, vol. 11, no. 2-3, pp. 1-14. [2126]

Clark, Gracia (2010): African market women, Seven life stories from Ghana, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [2127]

Clark, Gracia / Manuh, Takyiwaa (1991): Women traders in Ghana and the structural adjustment program, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 217-236. [2128]

Dennis, Carolyn / Peprah, Ernestina (1995): Coping with transition through organisation: Techiman market, Ghana, in: Gender and Development, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 43-48. [2129]

Eyango, Mahadevan Vijitha (2001): The classroom or the marketplace, Survival strategies of Ghanaian women, in: Perry, Susan / Schenck, Celeste (eds.): Eye to eye, Women practicing development across cultures, Zed Books, London, pp. 106-118. [2130]

Opare, James Adu (2003): Kayayei, The women head porters of Southern Ghana, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 33-48. [2131]

Overa, Ragnhild (1993): Wives and traders: Women's careers in Ghanaian canoe fisheries, in: Maritime Anthropological Studies, vol. 6, no. 1-2, pp. 110-135. [2132]

Overa, Ragnhild (2007): When men do women’s work, Structural adjustment, unemployment and changing gender relations in the informal economy of Accra, Ghana, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 539-563. [2133]

Robertson, Claire (1974): Economic women in Africa: Profit-making techniques of Accra market women, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol.12, pp. 657-664. [2134]

Robertson, Claire (1975): Ga women and change in marketing conditions in the Accra area, in: Rural Africana, vol. 21, pp. 157-171. [2135]

Robertson, Claire (1976): Change in the organization of the fish trade in twentieth century Accra, in: African Urban Notes, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 43-58. [2136]

Robertson, Claire (1978): Ga Women and socio-economic change in Accra, Ghana, in: Hafkin, Nancy / Bay, Edna (eds.): Women in Africa, studies in social and economic change, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 111-134. [2137]

Robertson, Claire (1983): The Death of Makola and other tragedies, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 17, pp. 469-495. [2138]

Robertson, Claire (1984): Formal or non-formal education? Entrepreneurial women in Ghana, in: Comparative Educational Review, 28, pp. 639-658. [2139]

Robertson, Claire (1984): Sharing the same bowl, A socio-economic history of women and class in Accra, Ghana, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [2140]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Comparative advantage: Women in trade in Accra, Ghana, and Nairobi, Kenya, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, Gereenwood Press, London, pp. 99-119. [2141]

Rocklsloh-Papendieck, Barbara (1988): Frauenarbeit am Straßenrand - Kenkeyküchen in Ghana, Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg. [2142]

Rocklsloh-Papendieck, Barbara (1992): Urbane Subsistenzproduktion: Die Kenkeyfrauen in Ghana, in: Rott, Renate (Hg.): Entwicklungsprozesse und Geschlechterverhältnisse, Über die Arbeits- und Lebensräume von Frauen in Ländern der Dritten Welt, Breitenbach Verlag, Saarbrücken, pp. 223-241. [2143]

Thiel, Alena / Stasik, Michael (2016): Market women and station women, Changing significations of gendered space in Accra, Ghana, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 459-478. [2144]

Vercruijsse, Emile (1983): Fishmongers, big dealers and fishermen - Cooperation and conflict between the sexes in Ghanaian canoe fishing, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, London, pp. 179-191. [2145]

Williamson, David et al. (2004): Gender differences in an emerging health profession, Ghanaian women as itinerant drug vendors, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 77-91. [2146]


Guinea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Guinea Bisseau

Havik, Philip J. (1998): Female entrepreneurship in a changing environment: Gender, kinship and trade in the Guinea Bissau Region, in: Risseauw Carla / Ganesh, Kamala (eds.): Negotiation and social space: A gendered analysis of changing kin and security networks in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, Sage Publications, London, pp. 205-225 [2147]

Havik, Philip J. (2004): Silences and Soundbites, The gendered dynamics of trade and brokerage in pre-Colonial Guinea Bissau Region, Lit-Verlag, Münster, 2004. [2148]


Ivory Coast

Hartig, Sabine (1988): Das Sparverhalten von Marktfrauen, Ergebnis einer empirischen Studie auf dem Markt von Adjamé/Abidjan, Arbeitspapiere zu Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft und Politik in Entwicklungsländern, Nr. 6, FZ Berlin. [2149]

Saschewag, Dagmar (1990): Marktfrauen in San Pedro, Nur wenigen gelingt der Aufstieg, in: Hillen, Peter (Hg.): Im Schatten des Wachstums, Arbeits- und Lebensbedingungen in der Cote d’Ivoire, Breitenbach Verlag, Saarbrücken, pp. 261-279. [2150]


Kenya

Akinboade, Oludele Akinloye (2005): A review of women, poverty and informal trade issues in East and Southern Africa, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 184, pp. 255-276. [2151]

Akinboade, Oludele Akinloye (2005): A review of women, poverty and informal trade issues in East and Southern Africa, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 184, pp. 255-276. [2163]

Mitullah, Winnie (1991): Hawking as a survival strategy for the urban poor in Nairobi: The case of women, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 13-22. [2152]

Mitullah, Winnie (1991): Hawking as a survival strategy for the urban poor in Nairobi: The case of women, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 13-22. [2164]

Robertson, Claire (1993): Traders and urban struggle, Ideology and the creation of a female underclass in Nairobi, 1960-1990, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 9-42. [2153]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Comparative advantage: Women in trade in Accra, Ghana, and Nairobi, Kenya, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 99-119. [2154]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Trade, gender and poverty in the Nairobi area: Women’s strategies for survival and independence in the 1980s, in: Blumberg, Rae Lesser (eds.): Engendering wealth and well-being: Empowerment for global change, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 65-87. [2155]

Robertson, Claire (1996): Transitions in Kenyan patriarchy, Attempts to control women traders in Nairobi area, in: Sheldon, K. (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 47-71. [2156]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Gender and trade relations in Central Kenya in the late nineteent century, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 23-47. [2157]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Trouble showed the way, Women, men and trade in the Nairobi area, 1890-1990, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [2158]

Robertson, Claire (1998): Women entrepreneurs? Trade and the gender division of labour in Nairobi, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurs, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 109-127. [2159]

Robertson, Claire (1993): Traders and urban struggle, Ideology and the creation of a female underclass in Nairobi, 1960-1990, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 9-42. [2165]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Comparative advantage: Women in trade in Accra, Ghana, and Nairobi, Kenya, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 99-119. [2166]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Trade, gender and poverty in the Nairobi area: Women’s strategies for survival and independence in the 1980s, in: Blumberg, Rae Lesser (eds.): Engendering wealth and well-being: Empowerment for global change, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 65-87. [2167]

Robertson, Claire (1996): Transitions in Kenyan patriarchy, Attempts to control women traders in Nairobi area, in: Sheldon, K. (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 47-71. [2168]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Gender and trade relations in Central Kenya in the late nineteent century, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 23-47. [2169]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Trouble showed the way, Women, men and trade in the Nairobi area, 1890-1990, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [2170]

Robertson, Claire (1998): Women entrepreneurs? Trade and the gender division of labour in Nairobi, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurs, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 109-127. [2171]


Lesotho

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Liberia

Handwerker, W. (1973): Kinship, friendship and business failure among the market sellers of Monrovia, in: Africa, vol. 43, pp. 288-301. [2160]


Madagascar

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Malawi

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Mali

Harts-Broekhuis, E.J.A. / Verkoren, O. (1987): Gender differentiation among market-traders in central Mali, in: Journal of Economic and Social Geography, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 214-221. [2161]

Turittin, Jane (1988): Men, women and market trade in Mali, West Africa, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 583-604. [2162]


Mauritius

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Mozambique

Ahrends, Elke (2008): Lokale Märkte in Mosambik, Handel, Gender und Sozialbeziehungen, Lit-Verlag, Münster. [2172]


Namibia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Niger

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Nigeria

Bastian, Misty (2002): “Vultures of the market place”, South Eastern Nigerian women and discourses of the Ogu Umunwaanyi (Women’s War) of 1929, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 260-281. [2173]

Chuku, Gloria (1995): Women in the economy of Igboland, 1900-1970: A survey, in: African Economic History, 23, pp. 37-50. [2174]

Chuku, Gloria (1999): From petty traders to international merchants, A historical account of three Igbo women of Nigeria in trade and commerce, 1886-1970, in: African Economic History, 27, pp. 1-22. [2175]

Cornwall, Andrea (2007): Of choice, change and continuity, ‘Career strategies’ and tactics for survival among Yoruba women traders, in: Social Anthropology, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 27-46. [2176]

Eames, Elizabeth (1988): Why women went to war, Women and wealth in Ondo Town, Southeastern Nigeria, in: Clark, Gracia (ed.): Traders versus the state, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 81-97. [2177]

Ekechi, Felix (1995): Gender and economic power: The case of Igbo market women of Eastern Nigeria, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 121-139. [2178]

Emovon, Adesuwa (1997): Women of power, A study of market women’s associations in Benin City, Bendel State, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 203-214. [2179]

Falola, Toyin (1995): Gender, business, and space control: Yoruba market women and power, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 22-40. [2180]

Hill, Polly (1969): Hidden trade among the Hausa, in: Man, 4, pp. 392-409. [2181]

Hoffmann, Hortense (1983): Frauen in der Wirtschaft eines Entwicklungslandes - Yoruba Händlerinnen in Nigeria, Verlag für Entwicklungspolitik, Saarbrücken. [2182]

Iyun, Folosade / Oke, E.A. (1993): The impact of contraceptive use among urban traders in Nigeria, Ibadan traders and modernity, in: Momsen, Janet Henshall / Kinnaird, Vivian (eds.): Different places, different voices, Gender and development in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, Routledge, London, pp. 63-73. [2183]

Law, Robin (1995): Legitimate trade and gender relations in Yorubaland and Dahomey, in: Law, Robin / Centre for Commonwealth Studies (ed.): From slave trade to legitimate commerce, The commercial transition in nineteenth century West Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 195-214. [2184]

Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Wurster, Gabriele (1994): „Where I can get what I want“, Stand und Land aus der Sicht berufstätiger Frauen in zwei afrikanischen Städten, in: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, 119, pp. 185-200. [2185]

Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Wurster, Gabriele (1994): Committment to urban versus rural life among professional women in African towns, in: Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Reh, Mechthild (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 153-167. [2186]

Ogbomo, Onaiwu (1995): Esan women traders and pre-colonial economic power, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 1-21. [2187]

Okojie, Christina (1984): Female migrants in the urban labour market: Benin City, Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 3, pp. 547-562. [2188]

Osinubi, Tokunbo / Amaghionyeodiwe, Lloyd (2005): Women in development, The case of Bodija market in Ibadan, South Western Nigeria, in: Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 72-102. [2189]

Osirim, Mary (1992): Gender and entrepreneurship: Issues of capital and technology in Nigerian firms, in: Ahere, A. / Katz, Bernhard (eds.): Privatization and investment in Sub-Saharan Africa, Routledge Publications, New York, pp. 213-248. [2190]

Osirim, Mary (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146. [2191]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Children as entrepreneurs - Case studies from Kano, Nigeria, in: Greenfield, S. / Stickon, A. (eds.): Entrepreneurs and social change, University Press of America, Lanham, pp. 195-223. [2192]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Widows in Hausa society, Ritual phase or social status, in: Potash, B. (eds.): Widows in African societies, Choises and constraints, Stanford, Stanford University Press, pp. 131-152. [2193]

Schildkrout, Enid (1987): Age and gender in Hausa society: Socio-economic roles of children in urban Kano, in: Fontaine, J.S. (ed.): Sex and age as principles of social differentiation, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 109-137. [2194]

Schildkrout, Enid (1979): Women’s work and children’s work, Variations among Moslems in Kano, in: Wallmann, S. (ed.): Social anthropology of work, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 69-85. [2195]

Schildkrout, Enid (1982): Dependency and autonomy: The economic activities of secluded Hausa women in Kano, Nigeria, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 55-82. [2196]

Sudarkasa, Niara (1973): Where women work: A study of Yoruba women in the market place and in the home, Michigan. [2197]

VerEcke, Catherine (1995): Muslim women traders of Northern Nigeria: Perspectives from the city of Yola, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, James Currey Publishers, London, pp. 59-79. [2198]

Watts, Susan (1984): Rural women as food processors and traders: Eko market in in the Ilorin area of Nigeria, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 71-82. [2199]

Willer, Heidi (1995): Women industrialists - A potential for economic development in Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Hamburg, pp. 99-134. [2200]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1987): Marktfrauen in Nigeria, Ökonomie und Politik im Leben der Yoruba-Händlerinnen, Veröffentlichungen aus dem Institut für Afrikakunde, Hamburg. [2201]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1988): Frauenarbeit im informellen Sektor von Ibadan, Nigeria, Informationszentrum Afrika, Afrika Hefte 1, Bremen. [2202]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1988): Strukturanpassung - ein Ausweg aus der Krise? Auswirkungen der Strukturanpassungspolitik auf die Situation von Frauen in nigerianischen Städten, in: Beiträge zur feministischen Theorie und Praxis, Heft 23, pp. 65-75. [2203]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1989): „Unintended hardship“ - Zur sozio-ökonomischen Situation von Frauen in nigerianischen Städten, in: Gruppe Feministischer Internationalismus / Beheim-Schwarzbach, Beate et. al. (Hg.): Zwischen Staatshaushalt und Haushaltskasse, Frauen in der Weltwirtschaft, Bremen, pp. 94-106. [2204]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1990): Tendenzen struktureller Veränderungen im informellen Sektor am Beispiel von Frauenarbeitsbereichen in Ibadan (Nigeria), in: Boehm, Ulrich / Kappel, Robert (Hrsg.): Kleinbetriebe des informellen Sektors und Ausbildung im subsaharischen Afrika, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg, pp. 55-68. [2205]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1995): Research on gender relations with reference to Ghana and Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 135-151. [2206]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1997): Strukturanpassung und geschlechtsspezifische Differenzierungen am Beispiel Nigerias und Ghanas, in: Braig, Marianne (Hg.): Begegnungen und Einmischungen, Akademischer Verlag, Stuttgart, pp. 147-164. [2207]


Rwanda

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Senegal

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Sierra Leone

White, Frances E. (1987): Sierra Leone’s settler women traders, Women on the Afri-European Frontier, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor. [2208]


Somalia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


South Africa

Akinboade, Oludele Akinloye (2005): A review of women, poverty and informal trade issues in East and Southern Africa, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 184, pp. 255-276. [2209]

Burman, Sandra / Lembete, Nozipho (1996): Building new realities, African women and ROSCAs in urban South Africa, in: Ardener, Shirley / Burman, Sandra (eds.): Money go rounds, The importance of rotating saving and credit associations for women, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 23-47. [2210]

Downing, Jeanne (1995): The growth and dynamics of women entrepreneurs in Southern Africa, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Greenwood Press, Westport, pp. 177-196. [2211]

Fadane, Nommikelo (1998): Women street vendors and housing in Durban, in: Larsson, Anita (ed.): Changing gender relations in Southern Africa, Issues of urban life, Publications of the Institute of Southern African Studies, Roma, pp. 17-23. [2212]

Lund, Francie J./ Skinner, Caroline (1998): Women traders in Durban, Life on the streets, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 17-24. [2213]

Morgenrath, Birgit (1998): Das Ende der Unsichtbarkeit, in: Blätter des IZ3W, p. 32. [2214]

Morgenrath, Birgit (2000): Informeller Sektor und Selbstorganisierung – unverträglich? Das Beispiel der Frauengewerkschaft SEWU aus Südafrika, in: NRO Frauenforum (Hg.): Tagungsdokumentation: überleben im globalen Markt, Zukunft unbezahlter Frauenarbeit, Stuttgart, pp. 56-63. [2215]

Morgenrath, Birgit / Wick, Ingeborg (1993): Vukuzenzele – Selbst ist die Frau, Umbruch in Südafrika, Perspektiven der Frauen, Veröffentlichungen der Anti-Apartheid-Bewegung, Bonn. [2216]

Morgenrath, Birgit / Wick, Ingeborg (1996): Die südafrikanische Frauengewerkschaft SEWU, Arbeit im informellen Sektor, Veröffentlichungen Aktionsbündnis Afrika Süd, Prima Print, Köln. [2217]

Nene, Sbongile Daphne (1984): A survey of African women petty traders and self-employed in town and country in South Africa, in: Muntemba, Shimwayi (ed.): Rural development and women, Geneva, ILO-Publications, pp. 147-154. [2218]


South Sudan

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Sudan

El Nagar, Samia El Hadi (1988): Changing patterns of participation of women in petty trading activities in Khartoum, in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 14-23. [2220]

Nageeb, Salma Ahmed (2001): Der Markt, Weibliche Aneignung öffentlicher Räume, in: Lachenmann, Gudrun / Dannecker, Patra (Hg.): Die geschlechtsspezifische Einbettung der Ökonomie, Empirische Untersuchungen über Entwicklungs- und Transformationsprozesse, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 183-199. [2221]

Pitamper, Sunita (1999): Women in the informal sector in Khartoum, Between poverty and entrepeneurship, Lit-Verlag, Münster. [2219]

Salih, A.O.M. (1986): Women in trade, Vendors in Khartoum Area Markets, in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 37-40. [2222]

Schultz, Ulrike (2001): Der Markt als Frauenraum? Geschlechteridentitäten und geschlechtliche Arbeitsteilung auf afrikanischen Märkten, in: Wippel, Steffen / Cornelsen, Ilse (Hrsg.): Entwicklungspolitische Perspektiven im Kontext wachsender Komplexität, Bonn, pp. 453-486. [2223]

Schultz, Ulrike (2002): Das Konzept des Empowerment bei der Evaluierung von Frauenkreditprogrammen in Afrika, in: Afrika Spectrum, 37, 1, pp. 61-79. [2224]

Schultz, Ulrike (2004): Negotiating gender, Gender relations and identities in African market places, in: Wohlmuth, Karl / Gutowski, Achim / Knedlik, Tobias Meyn, Mareike / Pitamber, Sunita (eds.): African entrepreneurship and private sector development, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 413-439. [2225]


Swaziland / Eswatini

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Tanzania

Flynn, Karen (2005): Food, culture and survival in an African city, MacMillan Press, New York. [2226]

Green, Maia (1999): Trading on inequality: Gender and the drinks trade in Southern Tanzania, in: Africa, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 404-425. [2227]

Pietilä, Tuulikki (2002): Between decadent enjoyment and the struggle to survive, Market women resturcturing gender in Kilimanjaro, Working Paper, no. 235, African Studies Centre, Boston University, Boston. [2228]

Pietilä, Tuulikki (2007): Gossip, markets and gender, How dialogue constructs moral value in post-socialist Kilimanjaro, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison. [2229]

Tumbo-Masabo, Zubeida (1991): Palm oil producuction and fish trade at Ujiji, Kigoma Region, Tanzania, in: ILO (ed.): Rural development and women, Lessons from the field, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp. 37-46. [2230]


The Congo

Ngole, Jean-Pierre (1986): Social relations and group identity among women fishsellers in the Congo, in: Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 9, pp. 287-293. [2231]


Togo

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Uganda

Musisi, Nakanyike (1995): Baganda women’s night market activities, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 121-139. [2232]


Zambia

Fontana, Mariza (2002): Modelling the effects of trade on women, The case of Zambia, IDS Working Papers, no. 8, Institute of Devlepment Studies (IDS), Brighton. [2233]

Schuster, Ilsa (1982): Marginal lives: Conflicts and contradiction in the position of female traders in Lusaka, Zambia, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 105-126. [2234]

Tranberg Hansen, Karen (1980): The urban informal sector as a development issue: Poor women and work in Lusaka, Zambia, in: Urban Anthropology, vol. 9, pp. 199-225. [2235]

Tranberg Hansen, Karen (1989): The black market and women traders in Lusaka, Zambia, in: Parpart, Jane / Staudt, Kathleen (eds.): Women and the state in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 143-160. [2236]

Tranberg Hansen, Karen (1999): Second hand clothing encounters in Zambia, Global discourses, Western commodities and local histories, in: Fardon, Richard / van Binsbergen, Wim /van Dijk, Rijk (eds.): Modernity on a shoestring, Dimensions of globalizaiton, consumption and development in Africa and beyond, Eidos Publications, Leiden – London, pp. 215-222. [2237]

Tranberg Hansen, Karen (2004): Who rules the streets? The politics of vending space in Lusaka, in: Tranberg Hansen, Karen / Vaa, Mariken (eds.): Reconsidering informality, Perspectives from urban Africa, The Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 62-80. [2238]


Zimbabwe

Barnes, Teresa (1992): The fight for control of African women’s mobility in colonial Zimbabwe, 1900-1939, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 17, pp. 586-608. [2239]

Barnes, Teresa (1999): We women work so hard, Gender, urbanisation and social reproduction in colonial Harare, Zimbabwe, 1930-1956, James Currey Publishers, London / Oxford. [2240]

Barnes, Teresa (2002): Virgin territory? Travel and migration by African women in twentieth-century southern Africa, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 164-190. [2241]

Barnes, Terri / Win, Everjoyce (1992): To live a better life, An oral history of women in the city of Harare, 1930-1970, Baobab Books, Harare. [2242]

Burke, Timothy (1996): ‘Fork up and smile’: Marketing, colonial knowledge and the female subject in Zimbabwe, in: Gender and History, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 440-456. [2243]

Burke, Timothy (1996): „Sunlight soap has changed my life“: Hygiene, commodification, and the body in colonial Zimbabwe, in: Hendickson, Hildi (ed.): Clothing and difference, Embodied identities in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 189-212. [2244]

Burke, Timothy (1996): Lifeboy men, lux women - Commodification, consumption and cleanliness in modern Zimbabwe, Duke University Press, Lanham. [2245]

Chamlee-Wright, Emily (2002): Savings and accumulation strategies of urban market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 979-1005. [2246]

Drakakis-Smith, D.W. (1984): The changing economic role of women in the urbanization process: A preliminary report from Zimbabwe, in: International Migration Review, vol. 17/18, no. 4, pp. 1278-1292. [2247]

Freidberg, S. (1996): Onions are my husband, Survival and accumulation by West African market women/cultivating customers, Market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Economic Geography, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 353-358. [2248]

Horn, Nancy (1994): Cultivating customers, Market women in Harare, Zimbabwe, Baobab Books, Boulder. [2249]

Horn, Nancy (1995): Women’s fresh produce marketing in Harare, Zimbabwe: Motivations for women’s participation and implications for development, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Greenwood Press, Westport, pp. 141-156. [2250]

Horn, Nancy (1995): Market women, development, and structural adjustment in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17-42. [2251]

Horn, Nancy (1998): Overcoming challenges, Women micro-entrepreneurs in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurship, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 128-146. [2252]

Mudimu, Godfrey (1996): Urban agricultural activities and women’s strategies in sustaining livelihoods in Harare, Zimbabwe, in: Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 179-194. [2253]

Mupedziswa, Rodreck / Gumbo, Perpetua (1998): Structural adjustment and women informal sector traders in Harare, Zimbabwe, The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Report, no. 106, Uppsala. [2254]

Mupedziswa, Rodreck / Gumbo, Perpetua (2001): Women informal traders in Harare and their struggle for survival in an environment of economic reforms, The Nordic Africa Institute, Research Report, no. 117, Uppsala. [2255]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (1997): Rural-urban linkages, Masvingo’s double-rooted female heads of households, in: Zambezia, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 97-123. [2256]

Muzvidziwa, Victor (2001): Zimbabwe’s cross border women traders, Multiple identities and responses to new challenges, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 67-89. [2257]

Nachudwa, Diana (1995): Women in micro-enterprises: The case of Mbare, Zimbabwe, in: Sithole-Fundire, Sylvia / Zhou, Agnes / Larsson, Anita / Schlyter, Ann (eds.): Gender research on urbanization, planning, housing and everyday life, Harare, 1995, pp. 135-144. [2258]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1994): Women, work, and public policy: Structural adjustment and the informal sector in Zimbabwe, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel (ed.): Population growth and environmental degradation in Southern Africa, Boulder, pp. 61-84. [2259]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1995): Trade, economy, and family in urban Zimbabwe, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Westport, pp. 157-176. [2260]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1995): Trading in the midst of uncertainty: Market women, structural adjustment, and the prospects for development in Zimbabwe, in: African Rural and Urban Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 43-64. [2261]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1996): Beyond simple survival: Women microentrepreneurs in Harare and Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets - Urban women in Africa, Boulder, pp. 213-240. [2262]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146. [2263]

Osrim, Mary Johnson (1998): Negotiating identities during adjustment programs, Women micro-entrepreneurs in urban Zimbabwe, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurship, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 277-297. [2264]

Schlyter, Ann (1990): Women in Harare, Gender aspects of urban-rural interaction, in: Baker, Jonathan (ed.): Small town Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 182-191. [2265]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1990): Negotiated spaces and contexted terrain: Men, women and the law in colonial Zimbabwe, 1890-1939, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 622-648. [2266]

Schmidt, Elizabeth (1992): Peasants, traders and wives - Shona women in the history of Zimbabwe, 1870-1939, London. [2267]

Schneider, Gabriele (1999): Women’s economy between subsistence and market production in Harare, Zimbabwe, Working Paper no. 315, Fakultät für Soziologie, Forschungsschwerpunkt Entwicklungssoziologie, Universität Bielefeld. [2268]

Schneider, Gabriele (2002): Haushalte, Netzwerke und Markt, Frauenarbeit für Sicherheit und Gemeinschaft in den Townships von Harare, in: Peripherie, Nr. 85/86, pp. 32-57. [2269]

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