Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature on Literature

Africa OverviewAngolaBenin
BotswanaBurkina FasoBurundi
CameroonCentral African RepublicChad
D.R. Congo / ZaireDjiboutiEquatorial Guinea
EritreaEthiopiaGabon
GambiaGhanaGuinea
Guinea BisseauIvory CoastKenya
LesothoLiberiaMadagascar
MalawiMaliMauritius
MozambiqueNamibiaNiger
NigeriaRwandaSenegal
Sierra LeoneSomaliaSouth Africa
South SudanSudanSwaziland / Eswatini
TanzaniaThe CongoTogo
UgandaZambiaZimbabwe

Africa Overview

Martin, Karen / Xaba, Makhosazana (2013): Queer Africa, New and Collected Fiction, Modjaji Books, Johannesburg. [11721]

Andrade, Susan (2002): Gender and the public sphere in Africa, Writing women and rioting women, in: Agenda, vol. 54, pp. 45-59. [5700]

Andrade, Susan (2011): The nation writ small, African fictions and feminisms, 1958–1988, Duke University Press, Durham. [11691]

Arndt, Susan (1997): ‘Womanism’ und bärtige Frauen, in: Literaturnachrichten, Nr. 55, pp. 10-12. [5701]

Arndt, Susan (2000): Feminismus im Widerstreit, Afrikanischer Feminismus in Gesellschaft und Literatur, Unrast Verlag, Münster. (The dynamics of African feminism, Defining and classifying African feminist literatures, Africa World Press, Trenton 2002) [5702]

Arndt, Susan (2000): Optimismus und militante Resignation, Strömungen der afrikanischen feministischen Literatur, in: IZ3W, Nr. 242, pp. 36-38. [5703]

Arndt, Susan (2003): Grenzenloses Weiß-Sein, Weiß-Sein ohne Grenzen? Konzeptionen von Weiß-Sein und Feminismus in der afrikanisch-feministischen Literatur, in: Ehlers, Monika et al. (eds.): Fremdes Begehren, Repräsentationsformen transkultureller Beziehungen, Böhlau Verlag, Weimar, pp. 107-120. [5704]

Arndt, Susan (2006): Beyond the boundaries of identities and differences, The dynamic relationship of ‘race’ and gender in African literatures, in: Arndt, Susan et al. (ed.): Africa, Europe and (post)colonialism, Racism, migration and new diasporas in African literatures, Bayreuth Africa Series, Bayreuth, pp. 139-158. [5705]

Arndt, Susan (2007): Kritische Distanz, Konzepte des afrikanischen Feminismus in Theorie und Literatur, in: Frauensolidarität, 2, pp. 10-11. [5706]

Assah, Augustine (2004): Thematic representation of traditional culture in francophone African women’s novels, in: Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 67-93. [5707]

Berrian, Brenda (1985): Bibliography of African women writers and journalists, Washington. [5708]

Boehmer, Elleke (1993): Transfiguring, Colonial body in post-colonial narrative, Stories of Women, in: African Literature Issues, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 266-277. [11583]

Boyce-Davies, Carol / Fido E. S. (eds.) (1994): Destroying the emptyness of silence, Francophone African women writers, University of Miami Press, Miami. [5709]

Brillmann-Ede, Heike (1997): Schriftstellerinnen aus Schwarzafrika, in: Loimeier, Manfred (Hg.): Zum Beispiel Afrikanische Literatur, Göttingen, pp. 69-77. [5710]

Brown, Lloyd Weslesley (1981): Women writers in black Africa, Greenwood Press, Westport Conn. [5711]

Bruner, Carlotte (1985): Unwinding threads: Writing by women in Africa, London. [5712]

Burger, Bibi (2020): Editorial, Engaged queerness in African speculative fiction, in: Scrutiny2, vol. 25, issuue 2, pp. 1-12. [11727]

Cazenave, Odile (1995): Writing the child, youth, and violence into the fancophone novel from Sub-Saharan Africa, The impact of age and gender, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 59-71. [5713]

Cazenave, Odile (1999): Rebellious women, the new female African novelists, Oxford. [5714]

Collins, Georgina (ed.) (2007): The other half of history, Francophone African women’s writing, Hea Ventree, London. [5715]

Counihan, Clare (2007): Reading the figure of woman in African literature: Psychoanalysis, difference, and desire, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 161-180. [5716]

Davies, Boyce Carol (1987): Wrapping one’s self in mother’s Akatado cloths, Mother-daughter relationships in the works of African women writers, in: Sage, Scholary Journal on Black Women, 4, 2, pp. 11-19. [5719]

Davies, Boyce Carol (1989): Black women’s writing: Crossing the boundaries, Routledge, London. [5720]

Davies, Boyce Carol (1990): Private selves and public spaces, Autobiography and the African woman writer, in: Neohelicon, 17, 2, pp. 183-210. [5721]

Davies, Boyce Carol (2015): Gender/class intersection and African women’s rights, in: Meridians, Feminism, Race, Transnationalism, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-25. [5722]

Davies, Boyce Carol (ed.) (1995): Moving beyong boundaries, International dimensions of black women’s writing, Pluto Press, London. [5723]

Davies, Boyce Carol / Fido, Elaine Savory (1989): African women writers, Towards a literary history, in: Owomoyela, Oyekan (ed.): A history of twentieth century African literature, University of Nebraska Press, pp. 311-346. [5724]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5725]

Daymond, M.J. / Driver, Dorothy et al. (eds.) (2003): Women writing Africa, The Southern region, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg. [5718]

Diaw, Amniata / Sutherland-Addy, Esi (eds.) (2005): Women writing Africa, West Africa and the Sahel, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg. [5726]

D’Almeida, Irène (1994): Francophone African women writers, Destroying the emptyness of silence, University of Florida Press, Gainesville. [5717]

Egejuru Akubueze, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.) (1998): Nwanyibu, Women being in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5727]

Emenyonu, Ernest (ed.) (2004): New women’s writing in African Literature, African Literature Today, no. 24, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [5728]

Englund, Harri (2004): Gender relations in African-language literature, Interpretative politics and possibilities, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 154-175. [5729]

Evans, Mari (ed.) (1985): Black women writers, Arguments and interviews, Pluto Publishing, London. [5730]

Flewellen, Elionor (1985): Assertiveness versus submissiveness in selected works by African women writers, in: Ba Shira, A Journal of African Languages and Literature, 12, 2, pp. 3-18. [5731]

Fonchingong, Charles (2006): Unbending gender narratives in African literature, in: Journal of International Women’s Studies, vol. 8, pp. 140-149. [5734]

Frank, Katherine (1984): Feminist criticism and the African novel, in: African Literature Today, vol. 14, pp. 34-48. [5732]

Frank, Katherine (1985): Women without men, The feminist novel in Africa, in: African Literature Today, vol. 15. [5733]

Harrow, Kenneth (1998): I’m not a Western feminist but …, A review of recent critical writings of African women’s literature, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 171-190. [5735]

Harrow, Kenneth (2002): Less Than One and Double: A Feminist Reading of African Women's Writing. Studies in African Literature, Heinemann, Portsmouth. [5736]

Hawley, John (2017): In transition, self-expression in recent African LGBTIQ narratives, in: Journal of the African Literature Association, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 120-134. [11743]

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton. [5737]

Hitchcott, Nicki (1997): African ‚herstory,’, The feminist reader and the African autobiographical voice, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 16-33. [5738]

Hitchcott, Nicki (2000): Women writers in francophone Africa, Berg Publishers, Oxford. [5739]

Holloway, Karla (1994): Morrings and metaphors, Figures of culture and gender in black women’s literature, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick. [5740]

Innes, Lynn / Rooney, Caroline (1997): African writing and gender, in: Mpalive-Hangson / Hyland, Paul (eds.): Writing in Africa, Longman Publishers, London, pp. 193-215. [5741]

Jalloh, Martina (1996): Westafrikanische Schriftstellerinnen und ihr Echo in Deutschland, in: Internationales Afrikaforum, 4, pp. 383-393. [5742]

James, Adeola (ed.) (1996): In their own voices, African women writers talk, James Currey, London. [5743]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5744]

Kalu, Anthonia (1994): Those who left lout in the rain, African literary theory and the re-invention of the African woman, in: African Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 77-95. [5745]

Kalu, Anthonia (1999): Women and development in West Africa: Traditional views in contemporary literature, in: James, Valentine U. / Etim, James S. (eds.): The feminization of development processees in Africa: Current and future perspectives. Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 199-214. [5746]

Kolawole, Mary Modupe (1997): Womanism and African consciousness, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5747]

LaPin, Deirdre (1984): Women in African literature, in: Hay, Margaret / Stichter, Sharon (eds.): African women South of the Sahara, London, pp. 102-118. [5748]

Le Roux, Elizabeth et al. (eds.) (2005): Gender, literature and religion in Africa, Codesria Publications, Dakar. [5749]

Lihamba, Amandian et al. (eds.) (2007): Women writing Africa, The Eastern Region, Feminist Press, New York. [5750]

Little, Kenneth (1980): The sociology of urban women’s image in African literature, Rowman and Littlefield, New York. [5751]

Makuchi, Nfah-Abbenyi Juliana (1997): Gender in African women`s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5752]

Mezu, Ure Rose (2004): A history of African women’s literature, Black Academie Press, New York. [5753]

Miller, Mary-Kay (1997): My mother/ my selves, (Re)reading a traditon of West African women’s autobiography, in: Research in African Literature Today, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 5-15. [5754]

Morgan, Elizabeth (1998): Writing our way out, The cross-cultural dynamics of African women’s novels, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 37, no. 1-2, pp. 102-117. [5755]

Mugambi, Helen Nabasuta / Allen, Tuzyline Jita (2010): Masculinities in African literary and cultural texts, Lynne Rienner, Boulder. [5760]

Mugambi, Nabasuta Helen / Allan, Tuzyline Jita (eds.) (2010): Masculinities in African literature and cultural texts, Lynne Rienner, Boulder. [5756]

Mugo, Micere (1994): The woman artist in Africa today, A critical commentary, in: Africa Development, vol. XIX, no. 1, pp. 49-99. [5757]

Munro, Brenna (2017): States of emergence, Writing African female same-sex sexuality, in: Journal of Lesbian Studies, vol. 21, issue 2, pp. 186-203. [11689]

Murray, Sally-Ann (2018): Queerying examples of contemporary South African short fiction, in: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 55, no.1. [11726]

Musengezi, Chiedza et al. (eds.) (2003): Women writing Africa, The Southern region, University of Witwatersrand Press, Johannesburg. [5758]

Mutiso, G.C.M. (1971): Women in African literature, in: East African Journal, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 4-14. [5759]

Nasta, Susheila (ed.) (1992): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Carribean, and South Asia, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick. [5761]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London. [5762]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5763]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1994): From orality to writing, African women writers and the (re)inscription of womanhood, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 137-157. [5764]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.) (1997): The politics of (m)othering: Womanhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge, London. [5765]

Ogundipe-Leslie, Molana (1987): The female writer and her commitment, in: Women in African Literature, Today, 15, pp. 5-13. [5768]

Ogundipe-Leslie, Molana (1994): Recreating ourselves, African women and critical transformations, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5769]

Ogunyemi, C.O. (1985): Womenism, The dynamics of the contemporary black female novel in English, in: Signs, vol. 11, no. 1. [5766]

Ogunyemi, Chikwene Okonjo & Allan, Tuzyline Jita (eds.) (2009): The twelve best books by African women, Critical readings, Ohio University Press, Bloomington. [5767]

Oje-Ade, Femi (1983): Female writers, male critics, in: African Literature Today, vol. 13, pp. 156-179. [5770]

Okonkwo, Juliet (1975): The talented women in African literature, in: African Quarterly, 15, 1-2, pp. 36-47. [5771]

Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Okome, Onookome (2007): Men and masculinities in African film and fiction, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [5772]

Palmer, Pauline (1989): Contemporary women’s fiction, Narrative practice and feminist theory, University of Missisippi Press, Jackson. [5773]

Pandey, Anita (2004): ‘Women palava no be small, women wahala no be small’, Linguistic gendering and patriarchal ideology in West African fiction, in: Africa Today, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 113-125. [5774]

Petersen, Kirsten Holst (ed.) (1988): Criticism and ideology, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala. [5776]

Petersen, Kirsten Holst / Rutherford, Anne (eds.) (1986): A double colonization, colonial and post-colonial women’s writing, Oxford. [5775]

Ricard, Alain / Veit-Wild, Flora (eds.) (2005): Interfaces between the oral and the written, Versions and Sub-Versions in African Literatures, 2, Matatu – Journal for African Cultures and Society, 31-32, Rodopi, Amsterdam. [5777]

Salami-Boukari, Safoura (2012): African literature, Gender discourse, religious values, and the African world view, African Books Collective, Oxford. [5778]

Scheldon, Kathleen / Rodrigues, Isabel Feo P.B. (2008): Outras vozes, Women’s writing in the Lusophone Africa, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, pp. 423-445. [5779]

Schild, Ulla (1990): Steter Tropfen ..., Der Beitrag afrikanischer Schriftstellerinnen zum Gesellschaftswandel, in: Zeitschrift für Kulturaustausch, 1, pp. 34-39. [5780]

Schipper, Mineke (1996): Emerging from the shadows: Changing patterns in gender matters, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 27, no. 1/2, pp. 155-171. [5781]

Schipper, Mineke (ed.) (1985): Unheard words, Women and literature in Africa, the Arab world, Asia, the Carribean and Latin America, Allison Publishers, London. [5782]

Schipper, Mineke (ed.) (1991): Sources of all evil, African proverbs and sayings on women, Allison and Busby, London / Chicago. [5783]

Sheldon, Kathleen (2008): ‘Outra vozes’, Women’s writing in lusophone Africa, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 423-445. [5784]

Stratton, Florence (1994): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London. [5785]

Taiwo, Oledele (1984): Female novelists in modern Africa, MacMillan Publishers, London. [5786]

Veit-Wild, Flora / Naguschewski, Dirk (eds.) (2005): Body, sexuality and gender, Versions and sub-versions in African Literature, 1, (Matatu 29-30), Rodopi, Amsterdam. [5787]

Volet, Jean-Marie (1992): Francophone women writers from Sub-Saharan Africa, An annotated bibliography, in: African Literature Association Bulletin, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 15-22. [5788]

Volet, Jean-Marie (1999): Tradition and modernity are here to stay, An analysis of francophone African women’s writings published 1997-1998, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 182-193. [5789]

Wallace, Karen Smyley (1986): Women and alienation: Analysis of the works of two francophone African novelists, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 63-73. [5790]

Ward, Cynthia (1996): Reading African women readers, in: Research in African Literature Today, vol. 27, pp. 78-86. [5791]

Weiss, Bettina (2004): Tangible vice throwing, Empowering corporeal discourses in African women’s writing of Southern Africa, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [5792]

Weiss, Bettina (ed.) (2004): The end of the unheard narratives, Contemporary perspectives on Southern African literatures, Kalliope Paperbacks, Bettina Weiss Verlag, Heidelberg. [5793]

Wesley, Paul Macheso (2021): Fiction as prosthesis, Reading the contemporary African queer short story, in: Tydskr.vir letterkunde, vol. 58, n.2, pp. 1-17. [11749]

Xaba, Makhosazana / Martin, Karen (2017): Queer Africa 2, New Stories, Ma´Thokos Books, Johannesburg. [11722]

Zabus, Chantal (2013): Out in Africa, Same-sex desire in Sub-Saharan literature and cultures, James Currey, Melton/Woodbridge. [5794]


Angola

Peres, Phyllis (2007): Women, bodies, and nation in Angolan poetry of the 1950s, in: Research in African Literatures, 38, 1, pp. 35-45. [5795]


Benin

Meyer, Lidwina (1999): Das fingierte Geschlecht, Inszenierungen des Weiblichen und Männlichen in den kulturellen Texten der Orisha- und Vodun-Kulte am Golf von Benin, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [5796]


Botswana

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Burkina Faso

Scott, Joyyce Hope (1997): Daughters of Yennenga, ‘Le Mal de peau’ and feminine voice in the literature of Burkina Faso, in: Women Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 83-96. [5797]


Burundi

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Cameroon

Allerkamp, Andrea (1991): Der ver-rückte Diskurs, Calixthe Beyala und Vumbi Yoka Mudimbe, in: Die innere Kolonisierung, Bilder und Darstellung des / der Anderen in deutschsprachigen, französischen und afrikanischen Literaturen des 20. Jahrhunders, Böhlau Verlag, Köln, pp. 149-161. [5798]

Asah, Augustine (2005): Veneration and desecration in Cathixthe Beyala’s La petite fille du révèrbere, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 155-171. [5799]

Chevrier, Jacques (1997): Calixthe Beyela, L’Africaine, in: Lettres et Cultures de Langue Fancaise, 22, pp. 7-14. [5800]

Darlington, Sonja (2003): Calixthe Beyala’s manifesto and fictional theory, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 41-52. [5801]

Darlington, Sonja (2003): Calixthe Beyalais Manifesto and fictional theory, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 41-52 [11717]

Emenyonu, Ernest (ed.) (2004): New women’s writing in African Literature, African Literature Today, no. 24, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [5802]

Etoke, Nathalie (2009): Mariama Barry, Ken Bugul, Calixthe Beyala, and the politics of female homoeroticism in Sub-Saharan francophone literature, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 173-189. [5803]

Köhler, Sigrid (2001): Kann die Andere sprechen? Calixthe Beyalas Anrufung der Mutter, Afrikanischer Feminismus zwischen Universalisierung und Differenz, in: Schlehe, Judith (ed.): Interkulturelle Geschlechterforschung, Campus Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., pp. 192-210. [5804]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Calixthe Beyala’s ‘femmes-fillette’, Womanhood and the politics of mothering, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): The politics of mothering, Womanhood, identity and resistance in African literature, London, pp. 103-110. [5805]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5806]

Teko-Abgo, Ambroise (1997): Werewere linking et Calixthe Beyala, Le discours fémininste et la fiction, in: Cahiers d’etudes Africaines, 145, pp. 39-58. [5807]


Central African Republic

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Chad

no entries to this combination of country and topic


D.R. Congo / Zaire

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Djibouti

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Equatorial Guinea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Eritrea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Ethiopia

Presbey, Gail (1999): Should women love ‘wisdom’, Evaluating the Ethiopian wisdom tradition, in: Research in African Literture Today, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 165-181. [5808]


Gabon

Toman, Cheryl (2016): Women’s writers in Gabon, Literature and herstory, Lexington Books, Lanham. [5809]


Gambia

Gomez, Pierre / Ndow, Isatou (2015): Gendered voices from the Gambia, Global Hands Publishing, Leicester. [11578]


Ghana

Adelugba, Dapo (1976): Language and drama: Ama Ata Aidoo, in: African Literature Today, no. 8, pp.72-84. [5810]

Asante, S. Y. (1994): Good night Africa, Good morning Europe': Europe's (Re) discovery by a black African Woman: Ama Ata Aidoo's `Our Sister Kelly', in: Africa Quarterly, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 64-75. [5811]

Azodo, Ada Uzoamaka / Wilentz, Gay (eds.) (1997): Emerging perspectives on Ama Ata Aidoo, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5812]

Booker, Keith (1998): Ama Ata Aidoo: Our sister Killjoy, in: derselbe (ed.): The African novel in English, An introduction, James Curry Publishers, London. [5814]

Brown, Lloyd Weslesley (1981): Ama Ata Aidoo, in: Brown, Lloyd Weslesley: Women writers in black Africa, Westport Conn., S.84-123. [5815]

Böttcher-Wöbcke, Rita (1997): Perception and depiction of reality in Ama Ata Aidoo’s work, in: Meyer-Bahlburg, Hilke (ed.): Levels of perception and reproduction of reality in modern African literature, University of Leipzig Papers on Africa, No. 3/4, pp.21-26. [5813]

Chetin, Sara (1987): Interview with Ama Ata Aidoo, in: Wasafiri, no. 5/6, pp.23-27. [5816]

Conde, Maryse (1972): Three female writers in modern Africa: Flora Nwapa, Ama Ata Aidoo and Grace Ogot, in: Présence Afriaine, vol. 82, pp.132-141. [5817]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5818]

Dolphyne, Florence (2000): Women writers in Ghana, in: Zimbabwe International Bookfair Trust: Indaba, Women and activism: Women Writers conference, Harare. [5819]

Dunton, Chris (2000): This rape is political: The siting of women's experience in novels by Aidoo, Ngugi, Farah and El Saadawi, in: English in Africa, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 1-35. [5820]

Elder, Arlene (1987): Ama Ata Aidoo and the oral tradition: A paradox of form and substance, in: Jones, Durosimi / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.): Women in African literature today, pp. 109-118. (and pubished in: African Literature Today, vol. 15, pp. 109-118.) [5821]

Elia, Nada (1999): ‘To be an African working woman’, Levels of feminist consciousness in Ama Ata Aidoo’s Changes, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 136-147. [5822]

Emenyonu, Ernest (ed.) (2004): New women’s writing in African Literature, African Literature Today, no. 24, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [5823]

Frank, Katherine (1987): Women without men: The feminist novel in Africa, in: Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.): Women in African literature today, London, pp. 14-34. [5824]

Gunner, Liz (1984): Ama Ata Aidoo, Anowa, in: Gunner, Liz: A handbook for teaching African literature, Heinemann Publishers, Oxford, pp. 63-71. [5825]

Hill-Lubin, Mildred (1982): The relationship of African-Americans and Africans: A recurring theme in the works of Ata Aidoo, in: Présence Africaine, 124, pp. 190-201. [5826]

Innes, C.L. (1991): Mothers or sisters? Identity, discourse and audience in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo and Mariama Ba, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 129-151. [5827]

Innes, C.L. (1995): Conspicous consumption: Corruption and the body politics in the writing of Ayi Kwei Armah and Ama Ata Aidoo, in: Gurnah, Abdulrazak (ed.): Essays on African Writing, Contemporary Literature, Heinemann Publishers, Oxford, pp. 1-18. [5828]

Jalloh, Martina (1996): Westafrikanische Schriftstellerinnen und ihr Echo in Deutschland, in: Internationales Afrikaforum, Nr. 4, pp. 383-392. [5829]

James, Adeola (1990): Ama Ata Aidoo, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London, pp. 9-27. [5830]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5831]

Kohrs-Amissah, Edith (ed.) (1999): Aspects of feminism and gender in the novels of the three West African Writers: Aidoo, Emecheta, Darko, Books on African Stuies, Bayreuth. [5832]

Korang, K.L. (1992): Ama Ata Aidoo's Voyage Out: Mapping the Coordinates of Modernity and African Selfhood in ‘Our Sister Killjoy’." In: Kunapipi. volume 14, no. 3. pp. 50-61. [5833]

Newell, Stephanie (1998): Those men and empty headed men, The shifting representation of wealth in two Ghanaian popular novels, in: Review of International Literature in English, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 141-166. [5834]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London. [5835]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5836]

Nwanko, Chimalum (1986): The feminist impulse and social realism in Ama Ata Aidoo’s No Sweetness here and Our sister Killjoy, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton. pp. 151-160. [5837]

Odamatten, Vincent (1994): The art of Ama Ata Aidoo, Polylectisa and reading against colonialism, University Press of Florida, Gainesville. [5838]

Ogundipe-Leslie, Molara (1982): The female writer and her commitment, in: African Literature Today, 13, pp. 71-87. [5840]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (1983): Female writers - male critics, in: African Literature Today, 13, pp. 158-179. [5839]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (2004): Talking and singing for Africa: The revolutionary poetry of Ama Ata Aidoo and Micere Githae Mugo, in: Ojo-Ade, Femi: Being black, Being human: More Essays on black culure, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5841]

Olaogun, Modupe O. (2002): Slavery and etiological discourse in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Buchi Emecheta, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 171-193. [5842]

Olaussen, Maria (2002): `About lovers in Accra', Urban intimacy in Ama Ata Aidoo's `Changes: A love Story', in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 61-80. [5843]

Opara, Chioma (1997): Narrative technique and politics of gender: Ama Ata Aidoo’s Our sister Killjoy and No Sweetness Here, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 137-146. [5844]

Opoku-Agyemang, Naana (1996): A reading of Ama Ata Aidoo’s Anowa, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 21-31. [5845]

Opoku-Agyemang, Naana (1997): ring lost voices: The short stories of Mabel Dove-Danquah, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 67-80. [5846]

Opoku-Agyemang, Naana (1999): Gender-role perceptions in the Akan folktale, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 116-139. [5847]

Osaki, Lillian (2002): Madness in black women's writing: Reflections from four texts: `A Question of Power', `The Joys of Motherhood', `Anowa', and `Possessing the Secret Joy', in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 4-20. [5848]

Phillips, Maggi (1994): Engaging dreams: Perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Tsitsi Dangarembga writing, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 89-103. [5849]

Podis, Leonard / Saaka, Yakubu (ed.) (1998): Challenging local hierarchies, Issues and themes in colonial and post-colonial African literature, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt. [5850]

Rooney, Carolyn (1991): ‘Dangerous knowledge’ and the poetics of survival: A reading of Our sister Killjoy and A question of power, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 99-128. [5851]

Stratton, Florence (1994): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London. [5852]

Thies-Thorkornoo, Susanne (1987): Die Rolle der Frau in der afrikanischen Gesellschaft. Eine Betrachtung von Ama Ata Aidoos Anowa und Efua Sutherlands Foriwa, in: Matatu - Zeitschrift für afrikanische Kultur und Gesellschaft, 1, 1, pp. 53-67. [5853]

Wilentz, Gay (1983): Ama Ata Aidoo, The dilemma of a ghost, in: Wilentz, Gay: Binding cultures, Black women writers in Africa and the diaspora, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 38-57. [5854]


Guinea

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Guinea Bisseau

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Ivory Coast

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Kenya

Adenekan, Shola (2021): African literature in the digital age, Class and sexual politics in new writings from Nigeria and Kenya, Boydell and Brewer, Rochester. [11624]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5855]

Halperin, Helena (2005): I laugh so I won’t cry, Kenya’s women tell the stories of their lives, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5856]

James, Adeola (1990): Rebeka Njau, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London 1990, pp. 103-110. [5857]

James, Adeola (1990): Muthoni Likimani, in: James, Adeoloa: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London 1990, pp. 59-62. [5858]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5859]

Kuria, Mike (ed.) (2003): Talking gender, conversations with Kenyan women writers, PJ Kenya, Nairobi, 2003. [5860]

Laurien, Ingrid (2000): Empowerment through storytelling? Oral literature and the new women’s movement in Kenya, in: Ständler, Katharina / Trüper, Ursula (Hrsg.): Afrikanische Frauen und kulturelle Globalisierung, Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, Köln, pp. 121-130. [5861]

Ndungu, Catherine (2006): The image of women in African oral literature, A case study of Gikuyu oral literature, Gender Issues Research Report Series, OSSREA, Addis Abeba. [5862]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): g African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London. [5863]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5864]

O’Barr, Jean (1987): Feminist issues in the fiction of Kenya’s women writers, in: Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.): Women in African literature today, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 55-70. [5865]

Stratton, Florence (1994): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London. [5866]


Lesotho

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Liberia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Madagascar

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Malawi

Ross, Hester (1998): ‘All men do is love, love....’: Context, power, and women in some recent Malawian writing, in: Phiri, Kings M. / Ross, Kenneth R. (eds.): Democratization in Malawi: A stocktaking, Christian Literature Association in Malawi, Blantyre. [5867]


Mali

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Mauritius

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Mozambique

Chizane, Paulina (2003): Das siebte Gelöbnis, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [5870]

Chiziane, Paulina (1997): Wind der Apokalypse, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [5868]

Chiziane, Paulina (2001): Liebeslied an den Wind, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [5869]

Owen, Hilary (2007): Mother Africa, father Marx, Women’s writing of Mozambique, 1948-2002, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg. [5871]


Namibia

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Niger

Boyd-Buggs, Debra (2003): Confiscated flowers: Writing by and about women in Niger, in: Boyd-Buggs, Debra / Scott, Joyce H. (eds.): Camel tracks: Critical perspectives on Sahelian literatures, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5872]

Niandu, Aissatou (2003): Deconstructing the stereotype of the passive and voiceless African woman: An analysis of Zarma poetry by women, in: Boyd-Buggs, Debra / Scott, Joyce H. (eds.): Camel tracks: Critical perspectives on Sahelian literatures, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5873]

Sidikou, Aissata (2001): Recreating worlds, reshaping worlds, The verbal art of women from Niger, Mali and Senegal, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5874]


Nigeria

Adeleye-Fayemi, Bisi (1993): Flora Nwapa’s life and writings: A legacy for Africans, in: African Women, Dec. 1993, pp. 43-46. [5875]

Adenekan, Shola (2021): African literature in the digital age, Class and sexual politics in new writings from Nigeria and Kenya, Boydell and Brewer, Rochester. [11623]

Aderinto, Saheed (2015): Modernizing love, Gender, romantic passion and youth literary culture in colonial Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 85, no. 3, pp. 478-500. [5876]

Alabi, Adetayo (1998): Gender issues in Zaynab Alkali’s novels, in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 22-28. [5877]

Alidou, Ousseina (2002): Gender, narrative space, and modern Hausa literature, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 137-153. [5878]

Arndt, Susan (1992): Kontinuität und ‘writing back’, Buchi Emecheta und die afrikanische Tradition der oral literature, in: Hard Times, 48, pp. 39-42. [5879]

Arndt, Susan (1995): Frauen und Frauenfeindlichkeit in den Märchen der Igbo, in: Bertrams, Annette (Hg.): Dichotomie, Dominanz, Differenz, Geschlechtsspezifische Platzanweisungen in Wissenschaft und Beruf, Deutscher Studienverlag, Weinheim, pp. 249-268. [5880]

Arndt, Susan (1998): African women’s literature, orature and intertextuality, Igbo oral narratives as Nigerian women writers models and objects of writing back, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth. [5881]

Arndt, Susan (1998): Continuation and writing back, Igbo women writers and ifo, in: Kloos, Wolfgang (Hg.): Across the lines, Intertextuality and transcultural communication in the new literatures in English, Rodopi Publishers, Amsterdam, pp. 103-127. [5882]

Arndt, Susan (2000): Igbo in English, Relexification and Igbo-lexification in Igbo women’s literature, in: Voices, The Wisconsin Review of African Literatures, 3, pp. 37-68. [5883]

Arndt, Susan (2006): Paradigms of an intertextual dialogue, ‘Race’ and gender in Nigerian literature, in: Matzke, Christine et al. (eds.): Of minstrelsy and masks, The legacy of Ezenwa-Ohaeto in Nigerian writing, Rodopi, Amsterdam, pp. 199-201. [5884]

Banyiwa-Horne, Naana (1986): African Womanhood: The Contrasting Perspectives of Flora Nwapa’s Efuru and Elechi Amadi’s The Concubine, in: Davies, Carole Boyc / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 119-130. [5885]

Boehmer, Elleke (1991): Stories of women and mothers: Gender and nationalism in the early fiction of Flora Nwapa, in: Nasta, Susheila (eds.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 3-23. [5886]

Booker, Keith (1998): Buchi Emecheta, The joys of motherhood, in: derselbe (ed.): The African novel in English, An introduction, James Curry Publishers, London. [5887]

Brien, Louise (2001): Buchi Emecheta and the ‘African dilemma’, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 95-106. [5890]

Brown, Lloyd Weslesley (1981): Flora Nwapa, in: Brown, Lloyd Weslesley: Women writers in black Africa, Westport Conn, pp. 122-157. [5888]

Brown, Lloyd Weslesley (1981): Buchi Emecheta, in: Brown, Lloyd Weslesley: Women writers in black Africa, Westport Conn, pp. 35-60. [5889]

Bryce, Jane (1991): Conflict and Contradiction in Women's Writing on the Nigerian Civil War, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 29-42. [5891]

Bryce, Jane (2008): Half and half children, Third generation women writers and the Nigerian novel, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 49-67. [5892]

Bryce-Okunlola, Jane (1991): Motherhood as a metaphor for creativity in three African women novels: Flora Nwapa, Rebeka Njau and Bessie Head, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 200-218. [5893]

Christian, Barbara (1985): The angle of seeing: Motherhood in Buchi Emecheta’s The joys of motherhood and Alice Walker’s Meridan, in: Christian, Barbara (ed.): Perspectives on Black Women Writers, Pergamon Press, Oxford, pp. 211-251. [5894]

Chukwuma, Helen (1987): Nigerian female authors, 1970 to the present, in: Matatu - Zeitschrift für afrikanische Kultur und Gesellschaft, 1, 2, pp. 23-46. [5895]

Conde, Maryse (1972): Three female writers in modern Africa: Flora Nwapa, Ama Ata Aidoo and Grace Ogot, in: Présence Afriaine, vol. 82, pp. 132-141. [5896]

Cooper, Brenda (2007): Banished from Oedipus?: Buchi Emecheta's and Assia Djebar's gendered language of resistance, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 143-160. [5897]

Coulon, Virginia (1990): Women at war, Nigerian women writers and the civil war, in: Commonwealth, Essays and Studies, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-12. [5898]

Davies, Boycs Carole (1986): Motherhood in the works of male and female Igbo writers: Achebe, Emecheta, Nwapa and Nzekwu, in: Davies, Carole Boyc / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 241-256. [5899]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5900]

Daymond, M.J. (1985): Buchi Emecheta, laughter and silence, Changes in the concepts „women“, „wife“ and „mother“, in: Journal of Literary Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 64-74. [5901]

Dodson, Danita (1996): The cycle of utopia in Buchi Emecheta’s Rape of Shavi, in: Obsidian, II, Black Literature in Review, vol. 11, no. 1-2, pp. 3-20. [5902]

Eko, Ebele / Ogu, Julius / Oku, Emelia (1997): Flora Nwapa, Critical perspectives, University of Calabar Press, Calabar. [5903]

Emenyonu, Ernest N. (1973): Who does Flora Nwapa write for? in: African Literature Today, vol. 7, pp. 28-33. [5904]

Emenyonu, Ernest N. (1988): Technique and language in Buchi Emecheta’s The Bride Price, The Slave Girl and The Joys of Motherhood, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 23, 1, pp. 130-141. [5905]

Erwin, Lee (2002): Genre and authority in some popular Nigerian women’s novels, in: Research in African Literatures: vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 81-99. [5906]

Ezeigbo, Akachi (1996): Gender issues in Nigeria, A feminine perspective, Vista Books, Lagos. [5907]

Ezeigbo, Akachi (1997): Gender and conflict in Flora Nwapa’s novels, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 95-104. [5908]

Fido, Elaine Savory (1991): Motherlands: Self and separation in the work of Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head and Jean Rys, in: Nasta, Susheila (eds.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Carribean and South Asia, London, pp. 330-349. [5909]

Fishburn, Katherine (1995): Reading Buchi Emecheta, Cross-cultural conversations, Greenwood Press, Westport. [5910]

Fluche, Christiane (2002): Palaver, Geschlechter- und Gesellschaftsdiskurs in Nigeria, Kon/Textuelle Lesung ausgewählter Romane der Igbo-Autorinnen Buchi Emecheta und Flora Nwapa, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth. [5911]

Frank, Katherin (1982): The death of a slave girl, African womanhood in the novel of Buchi Emecheta, in: World Literature written in English, 21, 3, pp. 476-496. [5912]

Granqvist, Raoul / Inyama, Nnadozie (eds.) (1992): Power and powerlessness of women in West African orality, Umea Papers, Umea 1992. [5913]

Green-Simms, Lindsey (2016): The Emergent Queer, Homosexuality and Nigerian Fiction in the 21st Century, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 139-161. [11744]

Haraway, Donna (1988): Reading Buchi Emecheta, in: Inscriptions, 3-4, pp. 107-141. [5914]

Harrell-Bond, Barbara (1980): Mariama Ba, Winner of the first Noma Award for Publishing in Africa, in: African Book Publishing Records, 6, pp. 209-214. [5915]

Hauwa Kassam, Margaret (1997): Behind the veil of northern Nigeria: the writing of Zaynab Alkali and Hauwa Ali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 117-125. [5916]

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton. [5917]

Hogan, Patrick Holm (1999): „How sisters should behave to sisters“: Women’s culture and Igbo society in Flora Nwapa’s Efuru, in: English in Africa, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 45-60. [5918]

Hunter, Eva (1994): “What exactly is civilisation?” ‘Africa’, ‘The west’ and gender in Buchi Emecheta’s The rape of Shavi, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 47-62. [5919]

Ikonné, Chidi (1992): The folk roots of Flora Nwapa’s early novels, in: African Literature Today, vol. 18, pp. 96-104. [5920]

James, Adeola (1990): Buchi Emecheta, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London, pp. 34-45. [5921]

James, Adeola (1990): Flora Nwapa, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London pp. 111-117. [5922]

Jell-Bahlsen, Sabine (1995): The concept of Mammy Water in Flora Nwapa’s novels, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 26, no. 2, pp.199-289. [5923]

Johnson, Rotimi (1988): The social vision of Zaynab Alkali, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 649-655. [5926]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5924]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5927]

Julien, Eileen (2007): When a man loves a woman, Gender and national identity in Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Mariama Ba’s Scarlet Song, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 205-222. [5925]

Katrak, K.H. (1987): Womanhood / Motherhood: Variations on a theme in selected novels of Buchi Emecheta, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 159-170. [5928]

Kohrs-Amissah, Edith (ed.) (1999): Aspects of feminism and gender in the novels of the three West African Writers: Aidoo, Emecheta, Darko, Books on African Stuies, Bayreuth. [5929]

Linton Umeh, Marie (1986): Reintegration with a lost self: A study of Cuchi Emecheta’s Double Yoke, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 173-180. [5930]

Mack, Beverly (1981): Hausa women poets, Ghost writers, in: Ba Shiru, 12, 2. [5931]

Mack, Beverly (1986): Songs from Silence: Hausa women’s poetry, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 181-190. [5932]

Mezu, Ure Rose (1997): Buchi Emecheta’s ‚the bride price’ and ‚the slave girl’, A schizoanalytic perspective, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 131-146. [5933]

Moyola, Ibiyemi (1997): The onus of womanhood: Mariama Bâ and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (Hg.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 126-136. [5934]

Nandakumar, Premar (1971): An image of African womanhood: A study of Flora Nwapa’s Efuru, in: African Quarterly, 11, pp. 136-146. [5935]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London. [5936]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5937]

Ngcobo, Lauretta (1988): African motherhood - myths and reality, in: Petersen, Kirsten (ed.): Criticism and Ideology, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 141-154. [5938]

Nwajiaku, Ijeoma (2009): Building bridges and shifting frontiers, Gender, culture and identity in Buchi Emecheta’s Kehinde and The new tribe, in: Korieh, Chima / Okeke-Ihejirika, Philomina (eds.): Gendering global transformations, Gender, culture, race, and identity, Routledge, London, pp. 135-149. [5939]

Nzegwu, Femi (2001): Love, motherhood and the African heritage, The legacy of Flora Nwapa, African Books Collective, Oxford. [5940]

Ogunjimi, Bayo (1997): Masculinity: The military, women and cultural politics in Nigeria, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African Women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 29-39. [5944]

Ogunyemi, Chikwenye Okonjo (1995): Flora Nwapa, in: Special issue: Research in African Literature, vol. 26, no. 2. [5942]

Ogunyemi, Chikwenye Okonjo (1996): Africa wo/men palava, The Nigerian novel by women, University of Chicago Press, Chicago. [5943]

Oha, Obododimma (1997): Culture and gender semantics in Flora Nwapa’s poetry, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 105-116. [5945]

Ohaeto, Ezenwa (1988): The other voices: The poetry of three Nigerian writers, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no.3, pp. 662-668. [5941]

Ohaeto, Ezenwa (1988): The other voices: The poetry of three Nigerian writers, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 662-668. [5946]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (1988): Women and the Nigerian civil war, Buchi Emecheta and Flora Nwapa, in: Etudes Germano-Africaines, 6. [5947]

Olaogun, Modupe (2002): Slavery and etiological discourse in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Buchi Emecheta, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.171-193. [5948]

Otokunefor, Henrietta C. / Nwodo, Obiageli, C. (eds.) (1989): Nigerian female writers, A critical perspective, Malthouse Press, Lagos. [5949]

Palmer, E. (1983): The feminine point of view: Buchi Emecheta’s „The joys of motherhood“, in: African Literature Today, vol. 13, pp. 38-55. [5950]

Pandey, Anita (2004): Woman 'palava' no be small, woman 'wahala' no be small: Linguistic gendering and patriarchal ideology in West African fiction, in: Africa Today, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 113-138. [5951]

Pape, Marion (1997): Literacy representations of the Nigerian civil war and the case of Flora Nwapa’s Never Again, in: Meyer-Bahlburg, Hilke (ed.): Levels of perception and reproduction of reality in modern African literature, University of Leipzig Papers on Africa, No. 3/4, pp. 26-37. [5952]

Phillips, Maggi (1994): Engaging dreams: Perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Tsitsi Dangarembga writing, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 89-103. [5953]

Powell, Andrea (2008): Problematizing polygyny in the historical novels of Chinua Achebe: the role of the Western feminist scholar, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 166-184. [5954]

Raji-Oyelade, Aderemi (2008): Notes towards the bibliography of Nigerian women's poetry (1985-2006) / In: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 198-202. [5955]

Solberg, Rolf (1983): The women of black Africa, Buchi Emecheta: The woman’s voice in the new Nigerian novel, in: English Studies, 3, pp. 247-261. [5956]

Sougou, Omar (ed.) (2002): Writing accross cultures, Gender politics and difference in the fiction of Buchi Emecheta, Rodopi, Amsterdam. [5957]

Stratton, Florence (1994): Flora Nwapa and the female novel of development, in: dieselbe (ed.): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 80-107. [5958]

Stratton, Florence (1994): ’Their new sister’: Buchi Emecheta and the contemporary African literary tradition, in: dieselbe (ed.): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 108-132. [5959]

Taiwo, Oladele (1984): Buchi Emecheta, in Taiwo, Oladele: Female novelists in modern Africa, London. [5960]

Tunca, Daria (2018): Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as Chinua Achebe´s (unruly) literary daughter, The past, present, and future of ´Adichebean´ criticism, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 107-126. [11591]

Umeh, Linton Marie (1980): African women in transition in the novels of Buchi Emecheta, in: Presence Africaine, 4, pp. 190-201. [5961]

Umeh, Linton Marie (1986): Reintegration of the lost self: A study of Buchi Emecheta’s „double yoke“, in: Davies, Carole Boyc / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 173-180. [5962]

Umeh, Marie (ed.) (1994): Emerging perspectives of Buchi Emecheta, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5963]

Umeh, Marie (ed.) (1998): Emerging perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Africa World Pres, Trenton. [5964]

Uwakweh, Pauline Ada (1996): Female choices: The militant option in Buchi Emecheta’s Destination Biafra and Alice Walker’s Meridian, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 47-59. [5965]

Uwakweh, Pauline Ada (1998): Carvig a niche, Visisons of gendered childhood in Buchi Emecheta’s The Bride Price and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 9-20. [5966]

Uzoamaka Ada Azodo / Maureen Ngozi Eke (eds.) (2006): Gender and sexuality in African literature and film, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5967]

Ward, Cynthia (1990): What they told Buchi Emecheta, Oral subjectivity and the joys of ‘otherhood’, in: PMLA, 105, pp. 83-97. [5968]

Whitsitt, Novian (2003): Islamic Hausa feminism meets Northern Nigerian romance, The cautious rebellion of Bilkisu Funtuwa, in: African Studies Review, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 137-155. [5970]

Wilnetz, Gay (1992): Flora Nwapa: Efuru, in: Wilentz, Gay (ed.): Binding cultures, Black women writers in Africa and the diaspora, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 3-19. [5969]

Zabus, Chantal (2008): Of female husbands and boarding school girls, Gender bending in Unoma Azuah’s fiction, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 93-107. [5971]


Rwanda

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Senegal

Abubakar, Rashidah Ismalili (1993): The emergence of Mariama Bâ, in: Gurnah, Abdulrazak (ed.): Essays on African writing, A re-evaluation, Heinemann Publishers, London, pp. 24-37. [5972]

Abuk, Christina (2003): Urbanisation's long shadows, Mariama Ba's ‘So long a letter’, in: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 723-740. [5973]

Arungwa, C.I. (1993): Fiction and pressivism in children's education, A study of Aminata Sow-Fall's `L'Appel des Arenes', in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 6, no. 1. [5974]

Azodo, Ada (ed.) (2003): Emerging perspectives on Mariama Ba, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5975]

Azodo, Ada (ed.) (2007): Emerging perspectives on Aminta Sow Fall, The real and the imaginary in her novels, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5976]

Bayi, Omofolabo (1997): Negritude, feminism and the quest for identity, Re-reading Mariama Ba's `So long a letter', in: Women's Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 35-52. [5977]

Bugul, Ken (1991): The abandoned baobab, The autobiography of a Senegalese woman, Chicago Review Press, Chicago. [5978]

Busia, Abena (1991): Rebellious women: Fictional biographies - Nawal el Sadawi’s Women at Point Zero and Mariama Bâ’s So Long a Letter, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 88-98. [5979]

Cham, Mbeye (1984): The female condition in Africa, a literary exploration by Mariama Ba, in: A Currret Bibliography on African Affairs, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 161-171. [5980]

Cham, Mbeye (1987): Contemporary society and the female imagination: A study of the novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.): Women in African literature today, London, pp. 89-101. [5981]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5985]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1986): The concept of choice in Mariama Bâ’s fiction, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 161-171. [5982]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1994): Mariama Bâ: Intersections of gender, race, class and culture, in: Assiba D’Almeida, Irène: Francophone African women writers, Destroying the emptiness of silence, Gainesville, pp. 98-122. [5983]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1994): Aminata Sow Fall: Political Responsibilities, in: Assiba D’Almeida, Irène (ed.): Francophone African women writers, Destroying the emptiness of silence, Gainesville, pp. 140-153. [5984]

Edson, Laurie (1993): Mariama Ba and the politics of the family, in: Studies in Twentieth Century Literature, vol. 17, no. 1. [5986]

Edwin, Shirin (2004): African Muslim communities in diaspora, The quest for a Muslim space in Ken Bugul’s Le Baobab fou, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 35, pp. 91-104. [5987]

Esonvanne, Uzo (1997): Enlightment epistomology and „aesthetic cognition“: Mariama Bâ’s So long a letter, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Press, London, pp. 82-100. [5988]

Gehrmann, Susanne (2000): Empowerment and crisis, Re-reading women characters in Aminata Sow Fall’s novels, in: Ständler, Katharina / Trüper, Ursula (eds.): Afrikanische Frauen und kulturelle Globalisierung, Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, Köln, pp. 131-144. [5989]

Hawkins, Peter (1988): An interview with Aminata Sow Fall, in: African Affairs, vol. 87, no. 348, pp. 419-430. [5990]

Hawkins, Peter (1996): Marxist intertext, islamic reinscription? Some common themes in the novels of Sembaene Ousmane and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Ibnlfassi, Laola / Hitchcott, Nicki M. (eds.): African francophone writing, A critical introduction, Berg, Oxford/Providence Rhode Island. [5991]

Innes, C.L. (1991): Mothers or sisters? Identity, discourse and audience in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo and Mariama Bâ, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 129-151. [5992]

Irlam, Shaun (1998): Mariama Ba's ‘Une si longue lettre’:,The vocation of memory and the space of writing, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 76-93. [5993]

Jagne, S.F. (1998): Mariama Ba, in: Parekh, P.N. / Jagne, S.F. (eds.): Postcolonial African writers, Fitzroy Dearborn, London, pp. 59-74. [5994]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London. [5995]

Julien, Eileen (2007): When a man loves a woman, Gender and national identity in Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Mariama Ba’s Scarlet Song, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 205-222. [5996]

Ka, Aminata Maiga (1985): Tamatoulaye, Aissatou, Mirelle et …Mariama Ba, in: Notre Librairie, 81, pp. 129-134. [5997]

Kamara, Gibreel M. (2001): The feminist struggle in the Senegalese novel, Mariama Ba and Sembene Ousmane, in: Journal of Black Studies, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 212-228. [5998]

Kemp, Yakini B. (1999): Romantic love and the individual in novels by Mariama Ba, Buchi Emecheta, and Bessie Head, in: Liddell, Janice L. / Kemp, Yakini B. (eds.): Arms akimbo, African women in contemporary literature, University of Florida Press, Gainesville. [5999]

Kimball, A.M. / Cisse, S. / Fayemi, G. et al. (2000): Mariama Ba's ‘Une si longue lettre’ and subverting a mythology of sex-based oppression, in: Research in African literatures, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 132-150. [6004]

Kolawole, M. (1992): Miriama Ba and Nawal el Saadawi, Varying approaches to feminism, in: Ondo Journal of English Studies, vol. 6, pp. 23-31. [6005]

Larrier, Renée (1997): Francophone African women autobiographies, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Publications, London, pp. 192-202. [6000]

Latha, R.H. (2001): Feminisms in an African context, Mariama Ba's `so long a letter', in: Agenda, no. 50, pp. 23-40. [6001]

Makward, Edris (1986): Marriage, tradition and women’s pursuit of happiness in the novels of Mariama Bâ. in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 271-181. [6002]

Makward, Edris (1991): Women, tradition and religion in Sembaene Ousmane's work, in: Harrow, Kenneth W. (ed.): Faces of Islam in African Literature, Studies in African Literature Series, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, pp. 187-199. [6003]

Makward, Edris (1986): Marriage, tradition and women’s pursuit of happiness in the novels of Mariama Bâ. in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 271-181. [6006]

Marcinowski, Bettina (1982): Die Frau in Afrika, Eine Untersuchung zum schwarzafrikanischen frankophonen Roman Kameruns und Senegals, Frankfurt a.M. [6007]

Mbeye, B. (1987): Contemporary society and the female imagination, A study of the novels of Mariama Ba, in: African Literture Today, 14. [6008]

McElaney-Johnson, Ann (1999): Epistolary friendship: La prise de parole in Mariama Ba’s Une si longue lettre, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 110-121. [6009]

McNee, Lisa A. (2000): Selfish gifts, Senegalese women's autobiographical discourses, in: State University of New York Press, New York. [6010]

Miller, Mary-Kay F. (1996): My mothers / my selves: (Re)Reading a tradition of West African women’s autobiography, in: Research in African Literatures, 27, pp. 5-14. [6011]

Mojola, Yemi I. (1997): The onus of womanhood, Mariama Ba and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African Women, Gender, Popular Culture and Literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London/Atlantic Highlands. [6012]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Women’s voice: Mariama Bâ, Assia Djebar, in: Mortimer, Mildred: Journeys through the French African novel, James Currey, London, pp. 133-164. [6013]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Women’s flight, in: Mortimer, Mildred: Journeys through the French African novel, James Currey, London, pp. 165-177. [6014]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Enclosure and disclosure in Mariama Ba’s Une si longue letre, in: The French Review, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 69-78. [6015]

Moyola, Ibiyemi (1997): The onus of womanhood: Mariama Bâ and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 126-136. [6016]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London. [6017]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [6018]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1990): Mariama Bâ: Parallels, Convergence, and interior space, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 13-35. [6019]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1997): Urban speaces, women’s places: Polygymy as sign in Mariama Bâ’s novels, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (Hg.): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Press, London, pp. 162-191. [6020]

Nwachukwu-Agbada, J.O.J. (1991): „One wife be for one man“, Mariama Bâ’s doctrine for matrimony, in: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 561-573. [6021]

Ojo Ade, Femi (1982): Still a victim? Mariama Bâ’s „Une si longue lettre“ in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 71-87. [6022]

Plant, Deborah (1996): Mythic dimensions in the novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 102-111. [6023]

Prabhu, Anjali (2003): Mariama Ba’s So long a letter, Women, culture and development from a francophone/post-colonial perspective, in: Bhavnani, Kum-Kum / Foran, John / Kurian, Priya (eds.): Feminist futures, Re-imagining women, culture and development, Zed Books, London, pp. 239-255. [6024]

Riez, János (1990): Mariama Bâ’s Une si longue letter: An Erziehungsroman, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 27-42. [6025]

Sarvan, Charles Ponnuthurai (1988): Feminism and African fiction, The novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 453-464. [6026]

Sidikou, Aissata (2001): Recreating worlds, reshaping worlds, The verbal art of women from Niger, Mali and Senegal, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6027]

Sougou, Omar (2002): Resisting hybridity, Colonial and postcolonial youth in ‘Ambiguous adventure’ by Cheikh Hamidou Kane and `L'appel des arenes' by Aminata Sow Fall, in: Matatu, no. 25/26, pp. 213-27. [6028]

Sougou, Omar (2008): Transformational narratives: Hearing/reading selected Senegalese folktales by young women, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 26-38. [6029]

Staunton, Cheryl A. (1994): Mariama Ba, Pioneer Senegalese woman novelist, in: CLA Journal, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 328-335. [6030]

Stratton, Florence (1994): „Literature as a weapon“: The novels of Mariama Bâ, in: dieselbe: Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 133-157. [6031]

Stringer, Susan (1996): Through their own eyes, The Senegalese novel by women, Peter Lang Publishers, Frankfurt a.M. [6032]

Stringer, Susan (1988): Cultural conflict in the novels of two African writers: Mariama Ba and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Sage, pp. 36-41. [6033]

Taiwo, Oladele (1984): Mariama Ba, in: Taiwo, Oladele: Female novelists in modern Africa, London. [6034]

Treiber, Jeanette (1996): Feminism and identity politics: Mariama Bâ’s Un chant écarlate, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 111-123. [6035]

Wills, Dorothy D. (1995): Economic violence in postcolonial senegal, Noisy silence in novels by Mariama Ba and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Lashgari, Deidre (ed.): Violence, silence, and anger, Women's writing as transgression, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville. [6036]

Wylie, Hal (1997): Sow Fall, Sembene, Achebe and Senghor, Literary representations of political realities, in: Egejuru, Phanuel A. / Katrak, Ketu H. (eds.): Nwanyibu: Womanbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6037]

Yousaf, Nahem (1995): The ‘public’ versus the ‘private’ in Mariama Ba's novels, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 85-98. [6038]

Zucker, Marilyn S. (1997): On teaching ‘The abandoned baobab, A Senegalese woman's autobiography’, in: Women's Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 121-138. [6039]


Sierra Leone

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Somalia

Adan, Amina (1996): Women and words, The role of women in Somali oral literature, in: Comparative Studies in South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 81-92. [6040]

Hassan, Dahabo Farah / Adan, Amina (1995): Somalia, Poetry as resistance against colonialism and patriarchy, in: Wieringa, Saskia (ed.): Subversive women, in: Wieringa, Saskia (ed.): Subversive women, Women’s movements in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Carribean, Kali for Women, New Delhi, pp. 165-182. [6041]

Kapteijins, Lidwien (1999): Women’s voices in a men’s world, Women and the pastoral traditions in Northern Somali Orature, 1899-1980, Heinemann, London. [6042]

Wright, Derek (ed.) (1993): Fabling the feminine in Nurridin Farah’s novels, in: Gurnah, Abdulrazak (ed.): Essays on African writing, A re-evaluation, Heinemann Publishers, London, pp. 70-87. [6043]

Wright, Derek (ed.) (2002): Emerging perspectives on Nuruddin Farah, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6044]


South Africa

Baderoon, Gabeba (2015): "I Compose Myself", Lesbian Muslim Autobiographies and the Craft of Self-Writing in South Africa, in: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 897-915. [11740]

Abrahams, Cecile (ed.) (1990): The tragic life, Bessie Head and literature in South Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6045]

Alvarez-Pereyre, Jacques (1987): Images of power in the South African novel, The novels of Miriam Thali, in: Matatu, 1, 1, pp. 111-148. [6046]

Andrews, Grant (2020): Queer Cyborgs in South African Speculative Fiction, Moxyland by Lauren Beukes and The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, pp. 128-143. [11707]

Andrews, Grant (2019): The emergence of black queer characters in three post-apartheid novels, in: Tydskrif vir Letterkunde vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 1-9. [11738]

Attridge, D. (2005): Zoe Wicomb’s David Story and Elleke Boehme’s Bloddlines, in: Kunapipi, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 25-38. [6047]

Attwell, David / Easton, Kai (2010): Zoe Wicomb, Texts and histories, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 519-521. [6048]

Auga, Ulrike (2003): Intellectuals between resistance and legitimation, The cases of Nadine Gordimer and Christa Wolf, in: Current Writing, vol. 15, no. 1, pp.1-16. [6049]

August, Tyrone (1990): Interview with Gcine Mhlope, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 329-335. [6050]

Baiada, Christa (2008): On women, bodies and nation, Feminist critique and revision in Zoe Wicomb’s David story, in: African Studies, vol. 67, pp. 33-47. [6051]

Barash, Carol (1986): Virile womanhood, Olive Schreiner’s narrative of a master race, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 333-340. [6052]

Barash, Carol (ed.) (1987): An Olive Schreiner reader, Writings on women and South Africa, Routledge, New York. [6053]

Barnes, Hazel (2005): White men writing women, Issues of power, gender and ownership in a collaborative creation, in: South African Theatre Journal, vol. 19, pp. 93-115. [6054]

Bazin, Nancy Topping (1993): Sex, politics, and silent black women, Nadine Gordimer’s Occasion for loving, A sport of nature, and My son’s story, in: Fletcher, Pauline (ed.): Black/white writing, Essays on South African literature, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp. 123-133. [6055]

Bazin, Nancy Topping (2000): Nadine Gordimer’s fictional selves, Can a white women be ‘at home’ in black South Africa, in: Alternation, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 29-40. [6056]

Bazin, Nancy Topping (2000): White women, black revolutionaries, Sex and politics in four novels by Nadine Gordimer, in: Mwaria, Cheryl / Federici, Silvia / McLaren, Joseph (eds.): African visions, Literary images, political change and social struggle in contemporary Africa, Greenwood Press, London, pp. 177-191. [6057]

Bazin, Nancy Topping / Saymour, Marilyn (eds.) (1990): Conversations with Nadine Gordimer, University of Mississipi Press, Mississippi. [6058]

Beard, Linda Susan (1991): Bessie Head’s syncretic fictions, The reconceptualization of power and the rediscovery of the ordinary, in: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 575-587. [6059]

Berg, Mari-Ann (1998): Self, other and social context, Dialogic relationships in Nadine Gordimer’s an image of success, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 37, no. 1-2, pp. 142-155. [6060]

Berg, Mari-Ann (2002): Exploring the mind, Self, other and social context in Nadine Gordimer’s “An image of success”, in: English in Africa, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 55-72. [6061]

Berkman, Avrech Joyce (1979): Olive Schreiner, Feminism on the frontier, Eden Press Women’s Publication, St. Alban’s Vermont. [6062]

Bethlehem, Louise (2003): Aneconomy in an economy of melancholy, Embodiment and gendered identity in J.M. Coetzee`s Disgrace, in: African Identities, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 167-186. [6063]

Birch, Kenneth Stanley (1995): The Birch family, An introduction to the white antecedents of the late Bessie Amelia Head, in: English in Africa, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 1-18. [6064]

Boehmer, Elleke (1999): Without the West: 1990s Southern African and Indian women writers – A conversation?, in: African Studies, vol. 58, no. 2, pp. 157-170. [6065]

Boswell, Barbara (2003): WEAVEing identities, A women writers collective in Cape Town, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 581-591. [6066]

Boswell, Barbara (2020): And wrote my story anyway, Black South African women’s novels as feminism, University of Witwatersrand Press, Johannesburg. [6067]

Boyce-Davies, Carol (1994): Finding some space, Black South African women writers, in: Current Bibliography on African Affairs, 19, 1, pp. 31-45. [6068]

Bradford, Helen (1995): Olive Schreiner’s hidden agony, Facts, fiction and teenage abortion, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 623-641. [6069]

Briault Manus, Vicki (2001): The lever of hell, Autobiographical footholds to read Bessie Head’s ‘A question of power’, in: Commonwealth, Essays and Studies, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 25-30. [6070]

Brink, Andre (1994): Complications of birth, Interfaces of gender, race and class in ‘July’s people’, in: English in Africa, vol. 21, no. 1-2, pp. 157-180. [6071]

Brown, Coreen (2003): The creative vision of Bessie Head, Associated University Press, Madision. [6072]

Brown, Lloyd Weslesley (1981): Women writers in black Africa, Greenwood Press, Westport Conn. [6073]

Bryce-Okunlola, Jane (1991): Motherhood as a metaphor for creativity in three African women novels: Flora Nwapa, Rebeka Njau and Bessie Head, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 200-218. [6074]

Burdett, Carolyn (2000): Olive Schreiner and the progress of feminism, Evolution, gender, empire, St. Martin’s Press, New York. [6075]

Burger, Bibi (2020): The Relationship between Futurity and the Rurality and Urbanity of Spaces in the Queer African Science Fiction of Triangulum by Masande Ntshanga, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 112-127. [11708]

Burmann, Pauline (2000): The thread of the story, Two South African women artists talk about their work, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 155-165. [6076]

Carolin, Andy (2021): Post-Apartheid same-sex sexualities, Restless identities in literary and visual culture, Routledge, London/New York. [11714]

Chennels, Anthony (2004): The mimic women: Early women novelists and white southern African nationalisms, in: Historia, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 71-88. [6077]

Chetin, Sara (1989): Myth exile and the female condition, Bessie Heads’ “The collector of treasures”, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 114-137. [6079]

Christianse, Y. (1995): Sculpted into history, The Voortrekker mother and the gaze of the invisible servant, in: New Literature Review, 30. [6078]

Christman, Laura (1993): Colonialism and feminism in Olive Schreiner’s 1890 fiction, in: English in Africa, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 25-38. [6080]

Clayton, Cherry (1988): A world elsewhere: Bessie Head as historian, in: English in Africa, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 55-70. [6081]

Clayton, Cherry (1990): Radical transformations: Emergent women’s voices in South Africa, in: English in Africa, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 25-36. [6082]

Clayton, Cherry (1990): ‘A case for the indigenous’: Olive Schreiner in South Africa, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 22, pp. 184-191. [6083]

Clayton, Cherry (ed.) (1983): Olive Schreiner, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Johannesburg. [6084]

Clayton, Cherry (ed.) (1985): Olive Schreiner’s thoughts about women, Extracts of an ‘African farm’ and ‘dreams’, The State Library of South Africa Press, Pretoria. [6085]

Clayton, Cherry (ed.) (1989): Women and writing in South Africa, A critical anthology, Heinemann Publishers, Marshalltown. [6086]

Clingman, Stephen (1981): History from the inside, The novels of Nadine Gordimer, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 165-193. [6087]

Clingman, Stephen (1984): Writing a fractured society, The case of Nadine Gordimer, in: White, Landy / Couzens, Tim (eds.): Literature and Society in South Africa, Longman Publishers, Harlow, pp. 161-174. [6088]

Clingman, Stephen (1986): The novels of Nadine Gordimer, History from inside, Allen and Unwin Press, London. [6089]

Cloete, Nettie (2007): Zakes Mda: Shifting female identities in 'The heart of redness', in: The English Academy Review, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 37-50. [6090]

Coetzee, Carli (2001): They never wept, the men of my race, Antjie Krog’s Country of my skull and the white South African signature, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 685-696. [6091]

Coetzee, Carli (2010): ‘The one that got away’, Zoe Wicomb in the archives, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 559-570. [6092]

Coetzee, Paulette / MacKenie, Craig (1996): Bessie Head, Rediscovered early poems, in. English in Africa, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 29-39. [6093]

Cooper, Helen (1994): Bessie Head and Buchi Emecheta, Voyagers, in: Matatu, vol. 11, pp. 71-80. [6094]

Cooper, Pamela (2005): Metamorphosis and sexuality, Reading the strange passions of Disgrace, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 22-39. [6095]

Coullie, Judith Lütge (1996): (In)continent I-Lands, Blurring the boundaries between self and other in South African women’s autobiographies, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 133-148. [6096]

Coullie, Judith Lütge (ed.) (2004): Closest of strangers, South African women’s life writing, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg. [6097]

Coundouriotis, Eleni (1996): Autority and invention in the fiction of Bessie Head, in: Research in African Litertures, vol. 27, no. 2, pp.17-32. [6098]

Croeser, Chantelle (2020): A wilting whisper of Antjie Somers, A Meditation on the witchery and gender-nonconformance of Afrikaans folklore figure Antjie Somers, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 23-39 [11712]

Cujai, Nicole (2001): ‚And I too am not myself’ – Konstruktion weiblicher Identität in den Werken der englischsprachigen Gegenwartsliteratur Südafrikas, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [6099]

Davenport, Rodney (1983): Olive Schreiner and South African politics, in: van Wyk Smith, Malvern / MacLennan, Don (eds.): Olive Schreiner and after – Essays on Southern African literature in honour of Guy Butler, Cape Town, pp. 93-107. [6100]

Davies, C.B. (1986): Finding some space: Black South African women writers, in: African Affairs, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 31-45. [6101]

Davison, A. and Filatova, I. (1993): Olive Schreiner: A century in Russia, in: English in Africa, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 39-48. [6102]

Daymond, Margaret (1994): Freedom, femininity, adventure and romance: The elements of self-Presentation in `Melina Rorke, Told By Herself', in: Matatu, vol. 11, pp. 1-12. [6103]

Daymond, Margaret (1995): Class and discourse of Sindiwe Magona`s autobiography and fiction, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 561-572. [6104]

Daymond, Margaret (1996): Gender and “history”, 1980s South African women’s stories in English, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 191-213. [6105]

Daymond, Margaret (2002): Complementary oral and written narrative conventions: Sindiwe Magona’s autobiography and short story sequence “women at work”, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 331-346. [6106]

Daymond, Margaret (2002): Bodies of writing, Recovering the past in Zoe Wicomb’s David story and Elleke Boehmer’s Bloodlines, in: Kunapipi, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 25-38. [6107]

Daymond, Margaret (2004): ‘To write beyond the fact’: Fictional revisions of Southern African women in history by Yvonne Vera and Lauretta Ngcobo, in: African Literature Today, vol. 24, pp. 138-155. [6108]

Daymond, Margaret (2006): Self-translation, untranslatability, and postcolonial community in the autobiographies of Mpho Nthunya and Agnes Lottering, in: English in Africa, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 91-102. [6109]

Daymond, Margaret J. (ed.) (1996): South African feminisms, Writing, theory, and criticism, 1990-1994, Garland Publishing, New York. [6110]

Daymond, Margaret J. (ed.) (2003): Women writing Africa, The Southern region, Wits University Press, Johannesburg. [6111]

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Ogunbesan, Kolawole (1979): The Cape gooseberry also grows in Botswana, Alienation and commitment in the writings of Bessie Head, in: Presence Africaine, 109, pp. 92-106. [6262]

Ogwude, Sophie (1998): Protest and commitment in Bessie Head’s Utopia, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 70-81. [6259]

Ogwude, Sophie (2002): Personality and self re-creation in Bessie Head’s art, in African Literature Today, vol. 23, pp. 110-122. [6260]

Ogwude, Sophie (2000): An exile writing on home, Protest and commitment in the works of Bessie Head, in: African Literature Today, vol. 22, pp. 64-76. [6261]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (2004): African women writers and feminism, An example of Miriam Tlali, in: Ojo-Ade, Femi (ed.): Being black, being human, More essays on black culture, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6257]

Ola, Virginia Uzoma (1986): Women’s roles in Bessie Head ‘Ideal world’, in: Ariel, vol. 17, pp. 39-47. [6263]

Ola, Virginia Uzoma (1994): The life and works of Bessie Head, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston. [6264]

Olaogun, Modupe (1994): Irony and schizophrenia in Bessie Head’s ‘Maru’, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 25, pp. 69-87. [6265]

Olaogun, Modupe (2002): Slavery and etiological discourse in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Buchi Emecheta, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.171-193. [6266]

Olaussen, Maria (1997): Forceful celebration in harsh terrain, Place and identity in three novels by Bessie Head, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [6267]

Olaussen, Maria (2001): ‘Imagined families' in South African women's autobiographies, in: Eriksson Baaz, Maria E. / Palmberg, Mai (eds.): Same and Other: Negotiating African Identity in Cultural Production, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala. [6268]

Oliphant, Andries (ed.) (1998): A writing life, Celebrating Nadine Gordimer, Viking Publishers, London. [6269]

Opland, Jeff (ed.) (2007): The nation’s bounty, The Xhosa poetry of Nontsizi Mgqweto, Wits University Press, Johannesburg. [6270]

O’Brien, Colleen (1994): The search for Mother Africa, Poetry revises women’s struggle for freedom, in: African Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 147-155. [6256]

Parker, Kenneth (2001): Gendering the language, liberating a people: Women writing in Afrikaans and the ‘new’ South Africa, in. Kriger, Robert / Zegeye, Abebe (eds.): Culture in the new South Africa, After apartheid, vol. 2, Kwela Books, Cape Town, pp. 183-205. [6271]

Peck, Richard (1989): One foot before the other into an unknown future, The dialectic in Nadine Gordimer’s Burger’s daughter, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 26-43. [6272]

Perkins, Kathy (ed.) (1998): Black South African women, An anthology of plays, Routledge Publishers, London. [6273]

Petersen, Kirsten Holst / Rutherford, Anne (eds.) (1986): A double colonization, colonial and post-colonial women’s writing, Oxford. [6274]

Peterson, Kirsten Holt (1991): The search for a role for white women in a liberated South Africa, A thematic approach to the novels of Nadine Gordimer, in: Kunapipi, vol. 13, no. 1-2, pp. 170-177. [6275]

Pettersson, Rose (1995): Nadine Gordimer’s one story of a state apart, Uppsala University press, Uppsala. [6276]

Pridmore, J. (1997): The Wives of Henry Fynn: `Unwritten But Potentially Transfiguring Texts? The Untold Biographies of Vundhlazi of the Zelemu and Christina Brown, in: Alternation, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 73-83. [6277]

Quanyum, Mohamed A. (1996): July’s people, Gordimer’s radical critique of white ‘liberal’ attitude, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 13-24. [6278]

Ravell-Pint, Thelma (1995): Women’s writing and the politics of South Africa, The ambiguous role of Nadine Gordimer, in: Davies, Carole Boyce (ed.): Black women’s diaspora, Moving beyond boundaries, Bd. 2, Pluto Press, London, pp. 125-136. [6279]

Ravenscroft, Arthur (1976): The novels of Bessie Head, in: Heywood, Christopher (ed.): Aspects of South African Literature, Heineman, London, pp. 174-186. [6280]

Reddy, Vasu (2003): Performative identities: Race, sexuality and gender in Colleen Craig’s Crossing the line (1989) and Apart (1995), in: Current Writing, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 138-155. [6281]

Richards, Constance (2005): Nationalism and development of identity in postcolonial fiction, Zoe Wicomb and Michelle Cliff, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 20-33. [6282]

Robinson, Jennifer (2005): White women researching / representing ‘others’, From anti-apartheid to postcolonialism? in: Blunt, Alison / Rose, Gillian (eds.): Writing women, writing space, The Guildford Press, New York, pp. 197-225. [6283]

Ruden, Sarah (1999): Country of my skull, Guilt and sorrow and the limits of forgiveness in the new South Africa, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 165-179. [6284]

Ryan, Pamela (1998): Singing in prison, Women writers and the discourse of resistance, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): Sisterhood, feminism, and power, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 198-212. [6285]

Sample, Maxine (1991): Landscape and spatial metaphors in Bessie Head’s The collector of treasures, in: Studies in Short Fiction, 28, 3, pp. 311-319. [6286]

Sample, Maxine (2003): Critical essays on Bessie Head, Greenwood Publishing Group, New York. [6287]

Samuelson, Meg (2000): Reading the maternal voice in Sindiwa Magona’s To my children’s children and Mother to Mother, Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 227-245. [6288]

Samuelson, Meg (2002): The rainbow womb, Rape and race in South African fiction of transition, in: Kunapipu, Journal of Post-Colonial Writing, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 88-100. [6289]

Samuelson, Meg (2005): Home and the world, The contestation of social fictions in three South African women's memoirs, in: English Academy Review, vol. 22, pp. 32-42. [6290]

Samuelson, Meg (2007): The disfigured body of female guerilla, (De)militarization, sexual violence and redomestication in Zoe Wicomb’s David’s story, in: Signs, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 843-844. [6291]

Samuelson, Meg (2010): Oceanic histories and protean poetics, The surge of the sea in Zoe Wicomb’s ficton, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 543-558. [6292]

Schalwyk, D. (2001): Chronotypes of self in the writings of women political prisoners in South Africa, in: Yousaf, Nahem (ed.): Apartheid narratives, Rodopi, Studies in Literature, 31. Amsterdam. [6293]

Schipper, Mineke (1985): Interview with Miriam Tlali, in: Schipper, Mineke (ed.): Unheard words, Women and literature in Africa, the Arab world, Asia, the Carribean and Latin America, Alison and Busby, London, pp. 59-69. [6294]

Segall, Kimberly Wedeven (2005): Pursuing ghosts, The traumatic sublime in J.M. Coetzee`s Disgrace, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 40-54. [6295]

Sicherman, Carol (1993): Zoe Wicomb’s You can’t get lost in Cape Town, The narrator’s identity, in: Fletcher, Pauline (ed.): Black/white writing, Essays on South African literature, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp. 111-122. [6296]

Silva, Neluka (2004): The Gendered nation: Contemporary writings in South Africa, Sage Publishers, London. [6297]

Slovo, Gillian (1997): Every Secret Thing: My Family, My Country, Little and Brown Publishers, Boston/London. [6298]

Smith, Lauren (1999): Christ as Creole, Hybridity and the revision of colonial imagery in the works of Bessie Head, in: Eglish in Africa, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 61-80. [6299]

Smith, Rowland (1988): Leisure, law and loathing, Matrons, mistresses, mothers in the fiction of Nadine Gordimer and Jillian Becker, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 28. no. 1, pp. 41-51. [6300]

Smith, Rowland (eds.) (1990): Critical essays on Nadine Gordimer, G.K. Hall Publishers, Boston. [6301]

Solberg, Rolf / Hacksley, Malcolm (eds.) (1996): Reflections, Perspectives on writing in post-apartheid South Africa, National English Literacy Musuem, Grahamstown. [6302]

Stander, Christell (1992): Winding through nationalism, patriarchy, privilege and concern, A selected overview of Afrikaans women writing, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 5-24. [6303]

Stanley, Liz (2000): Encountering the imperial and colonial past through Olive Schreiner's `Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland", in: Women's Writing, vol. 7, no.2, pp. 197-219. [6304]

Strater, R. (2000): Using life histories to explore change: Women's urban struggles in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 38-46. [6305]

Stute, Barbara (1988): Zoe Wicomb “You can’t get lost in Cape Town”, in: Matatu, vol. 3-4, pp. 296-300. [6306]

Taylor, Viviene (1993): Tradition and women writers in Southern Africa, Or how to enjoy the river without carrying the water drum, in: Fletcher, Pauline (ed.): Black/white writing, Essays on South African literature, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp. 99-110. [6307]

Taylor, Viviene (1997): Economic gender injustice: The macro picture, in: Agenda, no. 33, pp. 9-15. [6308]

Taylor, Viviene (1997): Black women writers, English fiction in a new South Africa, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (Hrsg.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 107-117. [6309]

Temple-Thurston, Barbara (1988): Madam and boy: A relationship of shame in Gordimer’s July People, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 51-58. [6310]

Temple-Thurston, Barbara (1999): Nadine Gordimer Revisited, Twayne Publishing, New York. [6311]

Thale, T. (2000): Community and narration in Emma Mashinini’s ‘Strikes have followed me all my life’ in: Alternation, vol. 7, pp. 163-177. [6312]

Tlali, Miriam (1988): The dominant tone of black South African writing, in: Holst Petersen, Kirsten (ed.): Criticism and ideology, Seminar Proceedings no. 20, Scandinavian Institute of African Studies, Uppsala, pp. 199-204. [6313]

Tlali, Miriam (1998): Interview by Rosemary Jolly, in: Attridge, Derek / Jolly, Rosemary (eds.): Writing South Africa, Literature, apartheid, and democracy, 1970-1995, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 141-148. [6314]

Townsend, Rosemary (2001): Women as ‘collectors or treasures’, Bessie Head’s reconstruction of female identiy, in: Kaschula, Russell (ed.): African oral literature, Functions in contemporary contexts, New Africa Book, London, pp. 39-44. [6315]

Trump, Martin (1989): What time is this for a woman? An analysis of Nadine Gocdimer’s short fiction, in: Clayton, Cherry (ed.): Women and writing in South Africa, Heinemann Publishers, Marshalltown, pp. 183-208. [6316]

Uledi-Kamanga, Brighton (2002): Cracks in the wall, Nadine Gordimer’s fiction and the irony of Apartheid, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6317]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2000): The work of the nation, Heroic masculinity in South African autobiographical writing of the Anti-Apartheid struggle, in: Journal of Development Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 157-178. [6318]

Van der Merve, P.P. (1990): A poet’s commitment: Antjie Krog’s Lady Anne, in: Current Writing, Text and Reception in Southern Africa, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 131-146. [6319]

Van der Vlies, Andrew (2010): The archieve, the spectral, and narrative responsibility in Zoe Wicomb’s Playing in the light, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 583-598. [6320]

Van Niekerk, Annemarie (1994): Liberating herstory from history, in: Smith, A. et al. (ed.): Rethinking South African literary history, Durban, pp. 136-151. [6321]

Van Niekerk, Annemarie (ed.) (1990): Raising the blind, A century of South African women’s writing, Donker Press, Parklands. [6322]

Van Niekerk, Marlene (1996): Afrikaner women and her ‘prison’, Afrikaner nationalism and literature, in: Matatu, 15, pp. 141-154. [6323]

Van Wyk Smith, Malvern (1999): Napoleon and the giant, Discursive conflicts in Olive Schreiner’s ‘story of an African farm’, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 151-163. [6324]

Van Wyk Smith, Malvern / MacLennan, Don (eds.) (1983): Olive Schreiner and after, Essays on South African Literature, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town. [6325]

Vaubel, Natasha (1997): The battlefield of politics and selfhood in Bessie Head’s A question of power, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 83-106. [6326]

Veit-Wild, Flora / Naguschewski, Dirk (eds.) (2005): Body, sexuality and gender, Versions and sub-versions in African Literature, 1, Rodopi, Amsterdam. [6327]

Vigne, Randolph (ed.) (1991): A gesture of belonging – Letters by Bessie head, Heinemann Publishers, London. [6328]

Viljoen, Louise (1996): Postcolonialism and recent women’s writing in Afrikaans, in: World Literture Today, vol. 70, no. 1, pp. 62-72. [6329]

Vivian, Italia (ed.) (1991): The flawed diamond, Essays on Olive Schreiner, Dangaroo Press, Sydney. [6330]

Wagner, Kathrin (1994): Reading Nadine Gordimer, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [6331]

Waterman, David (1997): Olive Schreiner’s The story of an African farm, Power, gender and age, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 43-61. [6332]

Weiss, Bettina (ed.) (2004): Tangible voice-hrowing, Empowering corporeal discourse in African women’s writing, of Southern Africa, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M. [6333]

Weiss, Bettina (ed.) (2004): The end of unheard narratives, Contemporary perspectives on Southern African literatures, Bettina Weiss Publishers, Heidelberg. [6334]

Wicomb, Zoe (1990): To hear the variety of discourses, in: Current Writing, Text and Reception in Southern Africa, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 35-44. (und in: Daymond, M.J. (ed.): South African feminisms, Writing, theory and criticism, 1990-1994, Garland Publishing, New York, 1996, pp. 45-56. [6335]

Wicomb, Zoe (1991): Another story, in: Lefanu, S. / Hayward, S. (eds.): Colours of a new day, Writing for South Africa, Pantheon, New York, pp. 1-15. [6336]

Wicomb, Zoe (1995): Reading, writing, and visual production in the New South Africa, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. XXX, no. 2, pp. 1-15. [6337]

Wicomb, Zoe (1998): Shame and identity, The case of the coloured in South Africa, in: Attridge, Derek / Jolly, Rosemary (eds.): Writing South Africa, Literature, apartheid, and democracy, 1970-1995, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 91-107. [6338]

Wicomb, Zoe (2001): South Afican short fiction and orality, in: Bardolph, J. (ed.): Telling stories, Postcolonial short fiction in English, Rodopi, Amsterdam, pp. 157-170. [6339]

Wicomb, Zoe (2001): Five Afrikaner texts and the rehabilitation of whiteness, in: Kriger, Robert / Zegeye, Abebe (eds.): Culture in the new South Africa, After apartheid, vol. 2, Kwela Books, Cape Town, pp. 159-181. [6340]

Wilhelm, Cherry (1983): Bessie Head, The face of Africa, in: English in Africa, 10, 1, pp. 1-13. [6341]

Wisker, Gina (2000): ‘No world as yet fro what she has done’, Re-memory and revisioning in Bessie Head and South African women’s autobiographical writings, in: Alternation, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 5-28. [6342]

Wisker, Gina (2002): Redefining an African sky, South African women’s writing post apartheid, in: KUNAPIPI, Journal of Post Colonial Studies, vol. 24, no. 1 & 2, pp. 140-154. [6343]

Worsfold, Brian (1994): Black South African country women in Lauretta Ngcobo’ long prose works, in: Boehmer, Elleke / Chrisman, Laura / Parker, Kenneth (eds.): Altered states, Writing and South Africa, Dangoroo Press, Sydney, pp. 111-119. [6344]

Wyk, Smith van, Malvern / MacLennan, Don (eds.) (1983): Olive Schreiner and after, Essays on Southern African Literature, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town. [6345]

Xaba, Makhosazana / Martin, Karen (eds.) (2017): Queer Africa 2, New Stories, Ma Thoko´s, Braamfontein / Johannesburg. [11747]


South Sudan

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Sudan

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Swaziland / Eswatini

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Tanzania

no entries to this combination of country and topic


The Congo

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Togo

no entries to this combination of country and topic


Uganda

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton. [6346]

Kyomuhendo, Goretti (2007): Waiting, A novel of Uganda at war, Feminst Press, New York. [6347]

Nabutanyi, Edgar Fred (2020): Queering the post-apocalypse in three selected short stories by Dilman Dila, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 2,pp. 82-97. [11711]

Wangusa, Ayeta Aume / Barungi, Violet (eds.) (2003): Tears of hope, A collection of short stories by Ugandan rural women, Femite Publications Limited, Kampala. [6348]


Zambia

Chilala, Cheela (2013): Through the male eyes, Gendered styles in contemporary Zambian fiction, in: Chirambo, Reuben Makayiko / Makokha, J.K.S. (eds.): Reading contemporary African literature, Brill -Rodopi, Leiden, pp. 91-108. [11775]


Zimbabwe

Adah Uwakweh, Pauline (1998): Carvig a niche, Visisons of gendered childhood in Buchi Emecheta’s The bride price and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 9-20. [6401]

Adah Uwakweh, Pauline (1995): Debunking patriarchy: The liberation quality of voicing in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 75-84. [6349]

Aegerter, Lindsay Pentolfe (1996): A dialectic of autonomy and community, Tsitsi Dangarembga`s nervous conditions, in: Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 231-240. [6350]

Attree, Lizzy (2005): Already falling aparth? Phaswane Mpe, Kabello ‘Sello’ Duiker and Yvonne Vera, in: Wasafiri, no. 46, pp. 30-36. [6351]

Bardolph, Jacqueline (1990): The tears of the childhood of Tsitsi Dangarembga, in: Commonwealth, vol. 13, 1, pp. 38-47. [6352]

Basu, Biman (1997): Trapped and troping, Allegories of the transnational intellectual in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s ‚Nervous Conditions’, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 7-23. [6353]

Berndt, Karin (2005): Female identity in contemporary Zimbabwean fiction, Bayreuth African Studies, 73, Bayreuth. [6354]

Boehmer, Elleke (2003): Tropes of yearning and dissent, The troping of desire in Yvonne Vera and Tsitsi Dangarembga, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 135-148. [6355]

Bosman, Brenda (1996): A correspondence without theory, Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Daymond, M.J. (ed.): South African feminisms - Writing, theory and criticism, 1990-1994, Garland Publishers, New York, pp. 301-311. [6356]

Chennells, Anthony (1996): Authorizing women, Women’s authoring Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: Ngara, Emmanuel (ed.): New Writing from Southern Africa, James Currey, London, pp. 59-75. [6357]

Chigwedere, Yuleth (2016): Being nothingness, Trauma, loss and alienation in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s ‘The book of not’, in: Journal of Studies in Humanities and Sociale Sciences, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 116-125. [6358]

Chiwone, Emmanuel (1999): Women about women, Perceptions in Shona and Ndebele literatures, in: Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 31-43. [6359]

Cuthbeth, Tagwirei (2014): ‘Lame ducks’ in the time of HIV/AIDS? Exploring female victimhood in selected HIV/AIDS narratives by Zimbabwean female writers, in: Critical Arts, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 216-228. [6360]

Egejuru Akubueze, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.) (1998): Nwayibu, Women being in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton. [6361]

Elder, Arlene (2009): Narrative shape-shifting, Myth, humor and history in the fiction of Ben Okri, Kojo Laing and Yvonne Vera, James Currey, Oxford. [6362]

Emenyonu, Ernest (ed.) (2004): New women’s writing in African Literature, African Literature Today, no. 24, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [6363]

Gagiano, Annie (2007): Reading The Stone Virgins as Vera’s study of the katabolism of war, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 64-76. [6365]

Gaidzanwa, Rudo (1985): Images of women in Zimbabwean Literature, Baobab Books, Harare. [6364]

Gulick, Anne (2020): Decolonial temporalities in Tsitsi Dangarembga’s The Book of Not, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 35-54. [11577]

Gulick, Anne W. (2020): Oppressive Sameness and the Novels We Need, Tsitsi Dangarembga´s Challenge to Postcolonial Readerly Desires in the Twenty-First Century, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 463-467. [11590]

Hoffmann, Monika (2001): Schreiben als offener Prozess, in: IZ3W, Nr. 250, pp. 23-24. [6366]

Holst Peterson, Kirsten (1994): Interview with Tsitsi Dangarembga: Between gender, race and history, in: Rutherford, Anne (ed.): Into the nineties, Post-colonial women’s writing, Dangaroo Press, Armidale, pp. 345-360. [6367]

Hunter, Eva (2000): Zimbabwean nationalism and motherhood in Yvonne Vera’s Butterfly burning, in: African Studies, vol. 59, no. 2, pp. 229-243. [6368]

Kaler, Amy (1997): Maternal identity and war in Mothers of the revolution, National Women’s Studies Association Journal, no. 1, pp. 1-23. [6369]

Kopf, Martina (2002): A voice full of unremembered things, Literarische Darstellung sexueller Gewalt in Yvonne Veras Roman “Under the tongue”, in: Stichproben, Wiener Zeitschrift für Afrikastudien, 4, pp. 1-21. [6370]

Kopf, Martina (2005): Trauma und Literatur, Das Nicht-Erzählbare erzählen, Assia Djerba und Yvonne Vera, Brandes & Apsel, Frankfurt a.M. [6371]

Lazzari, Gabriela (2018): Peripheral Realism and the Bildungsroman in Tsitsi Dangarembga´s Nervous Conditions, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 107-124. [11589]

Lenta, Margaret (2005): Fiction and history, Unity Dow’s ‘Juggling truths’ and Tsitsi Dangaremgba’s ‘Nervous conditions’, in: English Academy Review, vol. 22, pp. 43-54. [6372]

Lewis, Desiree (2005): A tribute to Yvonne Vera, 19.9.1964-7.4.2005, in: Feminist Africa, issue 4, www.feministafrica.org [6373]

Ludicke, Penny (1997): Writing from the inside-out, Reading from the outside-in: A review of Yvonne Vera’s Nehanda and Without a name, in: Wright, Derek (ed.): Contemporary African fiction, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth, pp. 67-73. [6374]

Mabura, Lily G.N. (2010): Black women walking, in: Research in Afrian Literature, vol. 41, no. 3, pp.81-111. [11584]

Matshakayile-Ndlovu, Tommy (2007): The Changing Roles of Women in siNdebele Literature, in: Matatu, 27. [11570]

McWilliams, Sally (1991): Tsitsi Dangarembgy’s „Nervous Conditions“: At the crossroads of feminism and post-colonialism, in: World Literature Written in English, 31, 1, pp. 103-112. [6375]

Morris, Jane (ed.) (2008): Long time coming: Short writings from Zimbabwe, Amabooks, Harare. [6376]

Moyana, Rosemary (1994): Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions: An attempt in the feminist tradition, in: Zambezia, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 23-42. [6377]

Msengesi, Chideza (1994): No burden is so binding that it could not be dropped - Zimbabwean Women Writers on their way to self help, in: Brandsteller, Anna-Maria / Neubert, Dieter / Grohs, Gerhard (Hg.): Afrika hilft sich selbst, Prozesse der Institutionalisierung der Selbstorganisation, Lit-Verlag, Münster - Hamburg, pp. 52-56. [6378]

Muchemwa, Kizito Z. / Muponde, Robert (eds.) (2007): Manning the nation, Father figures in Zimbabwean literature and society, Weaver Press, Harare. [6379]

Muponde, Robert / Maodzwa-Taruvinga, Mandivavarira (ed.) (2002): Sign and taboo, Perspectives on the poetic fiction of Yvonne Vera, Weaver Press, Harare / James Currey, Oxford. [6381]

Mupondo, Robert (2007): Reading girlhood under the tongue, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 36-48. [6380]

Musanga, Terrence / Mutekwa, Anias (2013): Supra-masculinities and supra-feminiities in Solomon Mutsvairo’s ‘Chaminuka, Prophet of Zimbabwe’ (1983) and Yvonne Vera’s ‘Nehanda’ (1993), in: African Identities, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 79-92. [6382]

Musila, Grace (2007): Embodying experience and agency in Yvonne Vera’s Without a name and Butterfly burning, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 36-48. [6383]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [6384]

Niemi, Minna Johanna (2021): Critical representation of neoliberal capitalism and uneven development in Tsitsi Dangarembga´s This mournable body, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol 47, no. 5. pp.869-888. [11587]

Ouahmiche, G. / Boughouas, L. (2016): Tsitsi Dangarembgas Nervous Conditions, in: Journal of International Literature and Arts, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 104-112. [11585]

Owomoyela, Oyekan (1992): Identity and cultural representation in the colonised African psyche, Mariama Ba’s Scarlet song and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous conditions, in: Smit, Johannes (ed.): Body, identity, sub-cultures and repression in texts from Africa, CSSALL, Durban, pp. 77-110. [6385]

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