Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding South Africa

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Aggarwal, Rimjhim / Netanyahu, Sinaia / Romano, Claudia (2001): Access to natural resources and the fertility decision of women, The case of South Africa, in: Environment and Development Economics, vol. 6, pp.209-236.[918]

Andrew, Nancy (1998): More than a football field! Access to land among South African rural women, in: L’Afrique Politique, n.N., pp.87-106. (und in: Derman, B. et al. (eds.): Conflicts over land and water in Africa, James Currey, Oxford)[919]

Archer, Fiona / Meer, Shamim (1997): Women, tenure and land reform: The case of Namaqualand’s reserves, in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Phillip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.84-94. (und in: Cummings, Sarah / van Dam, Henk et al. (eds.): Gender perspectives on property and inheritance, A global source book, KIT Publishers, Amsterdam, 2001, pp.57-67).[920]

Babugura, Agnes (2010): Gender and climate change, South African case study, HBF, Cape Town.[921]

Bank, Leslie / Qambata, Linda (1999): No visible means of subsistence, Rural livelihoods, gender and social change in Mooiplaas, Eastern Cape 1950-1998, ASC working paper no. 34, African Studies Centre, Leiden.[922]

Beinart, William (1987): Women in rural politics: Herschel District in the 1920s and 1930s, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict - South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp.324-357.[923]

Bembridge, T.J. (1988): The role of women in agricultural and rural development in the Transkei, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 7, pp.149-182.[924]

Bob, Urmilla (1997): Gender struggles and social differentiation, in: Levin, Richard / Weiner, Daniel (eds.): ‘No more tears…’, Struggles for land in Mpumalanga, South Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp.137-152.[925]

Bob, Urmilla (2002): Rural African women, food (in)security and agricultural production in the Ekutheleni land redistribution project, KwaZulu-Natal, in: Agenda, no. 51, pp.16-32.[926]

Bob, Urmilla (2004): Rural women and technology in South Africa, Case studies form KwaZulu-Natal Province, in: Geo Journal, vol. 61, no. 3, pp.291-300.[927]

Bradford, Helen (1987): ‘We are now the men’: Women’s beer protests in the Natal countryside, 1929, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict - South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp.292-323.[928]

Bradford, Helen (1992): „We women will show them“: Beer protests in the Natal countryside, 1929, in: Crush, Jonathan / Ambler, Charles (eds.): Liquor and labour in Southern Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp.208-234.[929]

Budlender, Debbie (1992): Rural women, The „also runs“ in the development stakes, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 12, pp.27-40.[930]

Byamyima, Winnie / Morna, Colleen Lowe et al. (2007): At the coalface, Gender and local government in Southern Africa, Gender Links, Johannesburg.[931]

Bydawell, Moya (1997): AFRA confronts gender issues: The process of creating a gender strategy, in: Gender and Development, vol. 5, no. 1, pp.43-48.[932]

Camlin, Carol / Garenne, Michel / Moultrie, Tom (2004): Fertility trends and patterns in a rural area of South Africa in the context of HIV/AIDS, in: Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 2, pp.39-54.[933]

Claasen, Anika (2005): The Communal Land Rights Act and women, Does the act remedy or entrench discrimination and the distortion of the customary, Occasional Paper no. 28, PLAAS, Cape Town.[934]

Cloete, Laura (1992): Domestic strategies of rural Transkeian women, Development Studies Working Paper no. 54, Institute for Social and Economic Research, Rhodes University, Grahamstown.[935]

Cross, C.R. / Nzama, M.T. / Dlamini, O.S. (1998): When the rain came: Women of Thousand Hills in the 1987 flood disaster, in: Africanus, vol. 18, no. 1-2, pp.36-57.[938]

Cross, Catherine (1999): Women and land in the rural crisis, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 42, pp.12-27.[936]

Cross, Catherine / Friedman, Michelle (1997): Women and tenure: Marginality and the left-hand power, in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.17-34.[937]

Dlamini, Phiwase (2000): Land and housing, women speak out, in: Agenda, vol. 43, pp.84-89.[939]

Drimie, Scott (2003): HIV/AIDS and land, Case studise from Kenya, Lesotho and South Africa, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 20, no. 5, pp.647-658.[940]

Fürchtenicht, Meike (1997): „Women are doing anything!“ Potentials and constraints in rural development in the Transkei, in: Altmann, Uta / Therani-Krönner, Parto (Hrsg.): What have women’s projects accomplished so far? Humboldt University, Berlin, pp.99-107.[941]

Gordon, A. / Nkwe, D. / Graven, M. (1998): Gender and education in rural South Africa, in: Bloch, M. / Beoku-Betts, J.A. et al. (eds.): Women and education in Sub-Saharan Africa, Lynne Rienner Publications, Boulder, pp.229-245.[942]

Govender-Van Wyk, Sharmla (1999): Gender policy in land reform, in: Agenda, no. 42, pp.66-68.[943]

Hargreaves, Samantha (1996): The Land Reform Pilot Programme: Capturing opportunities for rural women, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 30, pp.18-25.[944]

Hargreaves, Samantha (1999): Land reform: Putting gender at the centre, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 42, pp.42-48.[945]

Harrison, Abigail / Montgomery, Elizabeth (2001): Life histories, reproductive histories, Rural South African women’s narratives of fertility, reproductive health and illness, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp.311-328.[946]

Hemson, David (2002): Women are weak when they are amongst men, Women’s participation in rural water committees in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 52, pp.16-22.[947]

Hill-Lanz, Sandra / O’Grady, Kathy (1997): Western Cape fruit and wine farms: Land, labour and housing tenure, in: Meer, Shamim (eds.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.111-120.[948]

Hutchings, Anne (2004): Problems of water, AIDS and home-based care, A case study from rural northern Kwa-Zulu Natal, in: Africanus, vol. 34, no. 2, pp.77-87.[949]

Izumi, Kaori (ed. (2007): Reclaiming our lives, HIV and AIDS, land and livelihoods, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[950]

Jacobs, Krista / Namy, Sophie et al. (2011): Gender differences in asset rights in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, International Centre for Research on Women (ICRW), Washington D.C. [952]

Jacobs, Susie (1998): Past wrongs and gender rights: Issues and conflicts in South Africa’s land reform, in: European Journal of Development Research, vol. 10, no. 2, pp.70-87.[951]

Jewkes, R. / Dunkle, K. et al. (2006): Factors associated with HIV sero-status in young rural South African women, Connections between intimate partner violence and HIV, in: International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 35, vol. 6, pp.1461-1468.[953]

Kaarhus, Randi et al. (2005): Women’s land rights in Tanzania and South Africa, A human rights based perspective on formalisation, in: Forum for Development Studies, vol. 32, no. 2, pp.443-482.[954]

Kleinbooi, Karin (2009): Farming and familial relations, Women’s fragile land rights under communal tenure in Namaqualand, in: Agenda, vol. 23, issue 81, pp.35-47.[955]

Kritzinger, Andrienetta / Vorster, Jan (1996): Women farm workers on South African fruit farms: Gender relations and the structuring of work, in: Journal of Rural Studies, vol. 12, no. 4, pp.339-351.[956]

Laburn-Peart, Catherine (1997): Holding the knife on the sharp side, Rural women and planning in Mogopa, South Africa, in: Third World Planning Review, vol. 19, no. 1, pp.71-90.[957]

Lanz, Hill (1994): Women on farms, Lawyers for Human Rights, Cape Town.[958]

Lemke, Stephanie / Heumann, N. / Bellows, Anne (2009): Gender and sustainable livelihoods, Case study of South African farm workers, in: International Journal of Innovation and Sustainable Development, vol. 42, no. 3, pp.195-205.[960]

Lemke, Stephanie / Vorster, H.H. et al. (2003): Empowered women, social networks and the contribution of qualitative research: Broadening our understanding of underlying causes for food and nutrition insecurity, in: Public Health Nutrition, vol. 6, no. 8, pp.759–764.[959]

Levin, Richard / Russon, Ray / Weiner, Daniel (1997): Class, gender and the politics of rural land reform, in: Levin, Richard / Weiner, Daniel (eds.): ‘No more tears…’, Struggles for land in Mpumalanga, South Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp.117-136.[961]

Liebenberg, Alida (1997): Dealing with relations of inequality, Married women in a Transkei village, in: McAllister, Patrick, (ed.): Culture and the commonplace, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp.349-373.[962]

London, Leslie / Rother, Hanna-Andrea (2003): Failing laws, Assumptions and realities for women in South African agriculture, in: Jacobs, Miriam / Dinham, Barbara (eds.): Silent invaders, Pesticides, livelihoods and women’s health, Zed Books, London, pp.204-213.[963]

Mahapa, Sabina / Mashiri, Mac (2001): Social exclusion and rural transport, Gender aspects of a road improvement project in Tshitwe, Northern Province, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 18, no. 3, pp.356-376.[964]

Marcus, Tessa (1990): Land reform: Considering national, class and gender issues, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 6, no. 2, pp.178-194.[965]

Mashiri, Mac / Mahapa, Sabina (2002): Social exclusion and rural transport, A road improvement project, Tshitwe, South Africa, in: Fernando, Priyanthi / Porter, Gina (eds.): Balancing the load, Women, gender and transport, Zed Books, London, pp.15-24.[966]

Matsetela, Ted (1982): The life story of Nkono Mma-Pooe, in: Marks, Shula / Rathbone, Richard (eds.): Industrialisation and social change in South Africa, Longman Publishers, London / New York, pp.212-237.[967]

McClendon, Thomas (2002): Genders and generations apart, Labour tenants and customary law in segregation-era South Africa, 1920s to 1940s, James Currey, Oxford.[968]

McIntosh, Alastair / Friedman, Michelle (1989): Women’s producer groups in rural Kwa Zulu Natal, Limits and possibilities, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 6, no. 4, pp.438-453.[969]

Meer, Shamin (1991): Constraints to land reform and gender equity goals, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, Special Issue: Empowering women, pp.71-89.[970]

Meer, Shamin (1997): Gender and land rights, The struggle over resources in Post Apartheid South Africa, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, (IDS-Bulletin), vol. 28, no. 3, pp.133-144.[971]

Meer, Shamin (1997): Introduction, in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.1-14.[972]

Mfono, Z.N. (1989): Women in rural development in Venda, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 6, no. 4, pp.495-497.[973]

Mfono, Z.N. (2009): Analysis of changing rural women’s reproduction behaviour patterns in South Africa, OSSREA, Addis Abeba. [974]

Mhago, Fanelwa / Samson, Melanie (2001): A gender analysis of recent South African land reform, in: Buregeya, Alfred / Garling, Marguerite et al. (ed.): Women’s land and property rights in situations of conflict and reconstruction, UNIFEM Publications, New York, pp.113-120.[975]

Middleton, Sue (1997): Women’s land rights and needs, The case of Thornhill and Merino walk, in: Meer, Shamim (eds.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.74-83.[976]

Mini, S.E. (1994): Gender relations of production in the Eastern Cape and the restructuring of rural apartheid, in: Africa Insight, vol. 24, pp.269-280.[977]

Mokgope, Kgopotso (2000): The mismatch between land policy and improved livelihood opportunities for women, in: Agenda, no. 46, pp.62-88.[978]

Mokgope, Kgopotso (2000): Land reform, sustainable livelihoods and gender relations, A case study of Gallawater A farm, University of the Western Cape, RR05/1, Bellville. [979]

Motala, Shirin (2000): Rural women demand meaningful representation in local government, in: Agenda, no. 45, pp.18-21.[980]

Mtshali, Sazile (2000): Monitoring and evaluation of women’s rural development extension services in South Africa, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 17, no. 1, pp.65-73.[982]

Mutangadura, Gladys B. / Sandkjaer, Bjorg (2009): Mitigating the impact of HIV and AIDS on rural livelihoods in Southern Africa, in: Development in Practice, vol. 19, no. 2, pp.214-226.[981]

Nair, Yugi / Campbell, Catherine (2008): Building partnerships to support community-led HIV/AIDS management, A case study from rural South Africa, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 7, no. 1, pp.45-53.[989]

National Land Committee (1998): Land update, Focus on Gender, no.66, Johannesburg.[983]

Naughton, Tracey (1996): Community radio: A voice for the voiceless, in: Agenda, no. 31, pp.12-18.[984]

Ndimande, P.S.M. (2001): Gender inequality: Still a critical issue in the development of rural KwaZulu-Natal, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 5, no. 2, pp.133-143.[985]

Nene, Sibongile (1988): Women caught in between, The case of rural women in KwaZulu, in: Africanus, vol. 18, pp.12-18.[986]

Ngqualeni, Malijeng / Makhura, Moraka (1996): Analysis of women’s status in agricultural development in the Northern Province, in: Lipton, Michael / Ellis, Frank / Lipton, Merle (eds.): Land, labour and livelihoods in rural South Africa, vol. 2, Kwa-Zulu Natal and Northern Province, Indicator Press, Durban, pp.335-356.[987]

Ngubane, Sizani (1999): Title to the land? in: Agenda, no. 42, pp.7-11.[988]

Oludele, Akinboade (2008): Gender, HIV/AIDS, land restitution and survial strategies in the Capricorn District of South Africa, in: International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35, no. 11, pp.857-877.[990]

Oludele, Akinboade (2009): Gender, HIV/AIDS, land reform and survival stratgies in the Limpopo Province of South Africa, Research and Policy Brief, no. 15, CODESRIA, Dakar.[991]

Oni, S.A. / Obi, C.L. / Okorie, A. et al. (2002): The economic impact of HIV/AIDS on rural households in Limpopo Province, in: South African Journal of Economics, vol. 70, no. 7, pp.1173-1192.[992]

Oomen, Barbara (1999): We want to secure our hope, Women and land rights in South Africa, in: Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa, Women challenging society, Stories of women’s empowerment in Southern Africa, NIZA Publications, Amsterdam, pp.3-16.[993]

Peltzer, Karl / Mosala, Thabang / Sisana, Olive et al. (2007): Barriers to prevention of HIV transmission from mother to child (PMTCT) in a resource poor setting in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 11, no. 1, pp.57-66.[994]

Posel, Dori (1997): Counting the poor: Who gets what in which households? in: Agenda, no. 33, pp.49-59.[995]

Posel, Dori (2001): Women wait, men migrate, Gender inequality and migration decisions in South Africa, in: Webb, Patrick / Weinberger, Katinka (eds.): Women farmers, Enhancing rights, recognition and productivity, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., pp.91-117.[996]

Potgieter, Cheryl-Ann / Pillay, Renay / Rama, Sharmla (2007): Women, development and transport in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[997]

Preston-Whyte, Eleanor / Nene, Sibongile (1991): Black women and the rural informal sector, in: Rogerson, Christian / Preston-Whyte, Eleanor (eds.): South Africa’s informal economy, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp.229-242.[998]

Rangan, Haripriya / Gilmartin, Mary (2002): Gender, traditional authority, and the politics of rural reform in South Africa, in: Development and Change, vol. 33, no. 4, pp.633-658.[999]

Redding, Sean (1992): Beer brewing in Umtata: Women, migrant labour, and social control in a rural town, in: Crush, Jonathan / Ambler, Charles (eds.): Liquor and labour in Southern Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp.235-251.[1000]

Redding, Sean (1993): Legal minors and social children, Rural African women and taxation in the Trans-kei, South Africa, in: African Studies Review, vol. 36, pp.49-74.[1001]

Rulumenui-Ntlombeni, Nompumelelo (2000): Survival strategies of rural women, in: Malherbe, Jeanette / Kleijwegt, Marc / Koen, Elize (eds.): Women, society and constraints, A collection of contemporary South African Gender Studies, Unisa Press, Pretoria, pp.132-139.[1002]

Sender, J. / Johnston, D. (1996): Some poor and invisible women: Farm labourers in South Africa, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 13, no. 4, pp.3-16.[1003]

Sharp, J. / Spiegel, A. (1990): Women and wages: Gender and the control of income in farm and Bantustan household, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 3, pp.527-549.[1004]

Simon, Chris (1991): “Who is eating all my money?” Women and financial dependency in rural Transkei, in: Women’s Studies, vol. 3, no. 1, pp.7-15.[1005]

Skinner, Kate (1999): Women and water, Breaking the barriers to participation, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 16, no. 2, pp.55-59.[1006]

Small, Janet (1992): Organizing rural women, The experience of TRAC, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 12, pp.9-19.[1007]

Sothshongaye, Ayanda / Moeller, Valerie (2000): ‘We want to live a better life like other people’: Self-assessed development needs of rural women in Ndwedwe, KwaZulu-Natal, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 17, no. 1, pp.116-134.[1008]

Telela, Rosalee (1996): Women on farms: Challenging servitude in their own name, in: Agenda, Journal about Women and Gender, no. 31, pp.56-60.[1009]

Waldman, Lisa / Ntsedi (1997): Women on highveld farms: An outlook for development, in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.97-110.[1011]

Waldman, Pearl Linda (1996): Monkey in a spiderweb - The dynamics of farmer control and paternalism, in: African Studies, vol. 55, no. 1, pp.63-86.[1010]

Walker, Cherryl (1997): Cornfields, gender and land, in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp.55-72.[1012]

Walker, Cherryl (2003): Piety in the sky, Gender policy and land reform in South Africa, in: Journal of Agrarian Change, 3, 1-2, pp.113-148.[1013]

White, Fiona (2010): Deepening democracy, A farm workers’ movement in the Western Cape, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp.673-691.[1014]

arts and culture

Andrews, Grant (2021): YouTube Queer communities as heterotopias, Space, identity and `Realness´ in Queer South African Vlogs, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 33, issue 1, pp. 84-100. [11814]

Arnold, Marion / Schmahmann, Brenda (eds.) (2005): Between union and liberation, Women artists in South Africa, 1910-1944, Ashgate Publishing, Aldershot.[1564]

Barnard-Naudé, J. (2010): Post-apartheid fraternity, post-apartheid democracy, post-apartheid sexuality, Queer reflections on Jane Alexander’s Butcher Boys, in: Leckey, R, Brooks, K (eds.), Queer Theory, Law, Culture, Empire, Routledge, London, pp. 69–85. [11796]

Barnes, Hazel (2005): White men writing women, Issues of power, gender and ownership in a collaborative creation, in: South African Theatre Journal, vol. 19, pp. 93-115.[1565]

Comley, Robin (ed.) (2006): Women by women, 50 years of women’s photography in South Africa, Wits University Press, Johannesburg.[1566]

Dawes, Nicholas (2003): Sue Williamson, Selected works, Double Storey Books, Cape Town.[1567]

Goodman, Lizbeth / Dike, Fatima (1999): Women, politics and performance in South African Theatre today, in: Contemporary Theatre Review, vol. 9, no. 1. [1568]

Horn, Anette et al. (eds.) (1994): Like a house on fire, Contemporary women’s writing, art and photography, COSAW Publishing, Johannesburg.[1569]

Lewis, Desiree / Baderoon, Gabeda (eds.) (2021): Surfacing, On being black and feminist in South Africa, Wits University Press, Johannesburg.[11924]

Loots, Lliane (1996): Re-membering protest theatre in South Africa, a gendered review of the historical and cultural production of knowledge in two plays, ‘The hungry earth’ and ‘you strike the women, you strike the rock’, in: Critical Arts, vol. 11, no. 2-3.[1570]

Marco, Derilene / Willoughy-Herald, Tiffany / Zegeye, Abebe / Siselpha, Futhi (2021): Black feminist approaches to cultural studies in South Africa´s twenty-five years since 1994, Africa World Press, Trenton.[11923]

Muholi, Zanele (2010): Phases and phases, Prestel Verlag, München.[1571]

Perkins, Kathy (ed.) (1998): Black South African women, An anthology of plays, Routledge Publishers, London.[1572]

Radhakrishnan, Smitha (2003): ‘African dream’, the imaginary of nations, race, and gender in South African intercultural dance, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 529-537.[1573]

Scott, Lwando (2021): Inxeba (The Wound), Queerness and Xhosa culture, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp. 26-38. [11818]

Wylie, Diana (2008): Art and revolution, The life and death of Thami Mnyele, South African Artist Jacana Media, Cape Town.[1574]

economy - formal and informal employment

Ahwireng-Obeng, Fred (1993): Gender, entrepreneurship and socioeconomic reparation in South Africa, in: Review of Black Political Economy, vol. 22, pp. 151-165.[1766]

Bank, Leslie (1994): Angry men and working women: Gender, violence and economic change in Qwaqwa in the 1980s, in: African Studies, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 89-114.[1767]

Banson, C. et al. (eds.) (1994): Gender equality in the workplace, Juta Press, Cape Town.[1768]

Beall, Jo (1990): Women and indentured labour in colonial Natal, 1860-1911, in: Walker, Cherryl (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 146-167.[1769]

Bendix, Willy / Morrison, Ann (1988): The role of women in the workplace: Some important trends and issues, in: Industrial Relations of South Africa, vol. 8, pp. 31-55.[1770]

Berger, Iris (1986): Sources of class consciousness: South African women in recent labour struggles, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Class and gender in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 216-236. (and in International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 49-66.)[1771]

Berger, Iris (1987): Solidarity fragmented: Garment workers of the Transvaal, 1930-1960, in: Marks, Shula / Trapido, Stanley (eds.): The politics of race, class and nationalism in 20th century South Africa, Longman Publishers, Burnt Mill, Harlow, pp. 124-155.[1772]

Berger, Iris (1989): Gender and working class history - South Africa in comparative perspective, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol.1, no. 2, pp. 205-222.[1773]

Bird, Adrienne (1985): Organising women workers in South Africa, in: South African Labour Bulletin, vol. 10, no. 8, pp.76-91.[1774]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1991): The meaning of informal work: Some women’s stories, in: Rogerson, Christian / Preston-Whyte, Eleanor (eds.): South Africa’s informal economy, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp. 15-33.[1775]

Brener, Loren / Pauw, Ilse (1998): Sex work on the streets of Cape Town, in: Crime and Conflict, no. 13, pp. 25-28.[1776]

Brink, Elsabé (1987): ‘Maar ‘n klomp ‘factory’ meide: Afrikaner family and community on the Witwatersrand during the 1920s, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict - South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 177-201.[1777]

Brink, Elsabé (1989): Purposeful plays, prose and poems: The writings of the garment workers, 1929-1945, in: Clayton, Cherry (ed.): Women and writing in South Africa, Heinemann Publishers, Marshalltown, pp. 107-128.[1778]

Casale, Daniela / Dorrit, Posel (2002): The continued feminisation of the labour force in South Africa, An analysis of recent data and trends, in: South African Journal of Economics, vol. 70, no. 1, pp. 156-184.[1779]

Cock, Jacklyn (1981): Disposable nannies: Domestic servants in the political economy of South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 21, pp. 63-83.[1780]

Cock, Jacklyn (1988): Trapped workers: The case of domestic servants in South Africa, in: Stichter, Sharon / Parpart, Jane (eds.): Patriarchy and class: African women in the home and the workforce, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 205-219. (and in: Women’s Studies International Forum, 10, 2, pp. 133-140).[1781]

Cole, Melissa (1992): ‘Inthuthuko means that we are going forward’, Hearing the voices of domestic workers in South Africa, in: Columbia Journal of Gender and Law, vol. 2, pp. 61-110.[1782]

Datnow, B. (1990): Perceptions of, and attitudes towards, the employment and advancement of women in the legal and advertising professions in the Cape Peninsula, in: South African Journal of Labour Relations, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 43-66.[1783]

De Haas, Mary (1991): Of joints and jollers, Culture and class in Natal shebeens, in: Preston-Whyte, Eleanor M. / Rogerson, C. (eds.): South Africa's informal economy, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp. 101-114.[1785]

Delport, Elize (1992): The legal position of domestic workers: A comparative perspective, in: The Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 181-207.[1786]

Delport, Elize (1994): Domestic workers, Light at the end of the tunnel, in: Lessing, Margaret (ed.): South African women today, Maskew Miller Longman Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 173-180.[1787]

Dlamini, Armstrong (2004): 'Threads of solidarity' revisited, Gender forums as important sites for contesting gender inequality, in: Transformation, no. 55, pp. 96-112.[1784]

Erasmus, Barney (1997): Women power, Aspects of work life, in: Agenda, no. 35, pp. 35-44.[1788]

Erwee, Ronel (1994): South African women: Changing career patterns, in: Adler, Nancy / Izraeli, Dafna (eds.): Competitive frontiers, Women managers in the global economy, Blackwell Publishers, Cambridge, pp. 325-342.[1789]

Fairhurst, U. Joan / Phalatse, Moserwa R. (1999): Industrial decentralization impacts on women as employees, The case of Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa, in: GeoJournal, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 237-244.[1791]

Fairhurst, U.J. / Hattingh, P.S. (1993): Leisure in the daily lives of South African economically active single mothers, in: Geo Journal, vol. 30, no. 1, pp.79-84.[1790]

Field, Sean (1991): “Sy is die Baas van die huis”: Women’s position in the coloured working class family, in: Agenda, no. 9, pp. 60-70.[1793]

Freund, Bill (1991): Indian women and the changing character of the Indian working class household in Natal, 1860-1990, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 414-429.[1794]

Friedman, Michelle / Hambridge, Maria (1991): The informal sector, gender and development, in: Rogerson, Christian / Preston-Whyte, Eleanor (eds.): South Africa’s informal economy, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp. 161-180.[1792]

Friedman, Michelle / Hambridge, Maria (1991): The informal sector, gender and development, in: Rogerson, Christian / Preston-Whyte, Eleanor (eds.): South Africa’s informal economy, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp. 161-180.[1795]

Gaitskell, Deborah / Kimble, Judy / Maconachie, Moira / Unterhalter, Elaine (1984): Class, race and gender: Domestic workers in South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 27/28, pp. 86-108.[1796]

Gear, Sasha (1998): Sex work a new dispensation? in: South African Labour Bulletin, vol. 22, pp.53-58.[1797]

Gordon, Adele (1993): Behind the barriers, Women, work and education on peri-urban smallholdings, in: Agenda, no. 18, pp. 28-40.[1798]

Grant, Brenda (1997): Domestic workers – Employees or servants? in: Agenda, no. 34, pp. 61-65.[1799]

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Hart, C.P. / Parnell, S.M. (1989): Church, state and the shelter of white working-class women in Johannesburg prior to world war two, in: South African Geographical Journal, vol. 71, no. 1, pp. 25-31.[1802]

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Human, Linda (1993): The development of black and female managers in South Africa, Why many affirmative action programmes fail, in: Management Education and Development, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 153-186.[1804]

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Human, Linda / Allie, Fatima (1988): Attitudes of white English-speaking male managers to the advancement of women in business, in: South African Journal of Labour Relations, vol. 12, no. 2, pp.38-50.[1806]

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Hyslop, Jonathan (1995): Incident at Ziman brothers, The politics of gender and race in a Pretoria factory, 1934, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 509-526.[1809]

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Jaffee, Georgina / Caine, Collette (1988): The Incorporation of African women into the industrial workforce, Its implications for the women's question in South Africa, in: Suckling, J. / White, L. (eds.): After apartheid, Renewal of the South African economy, James Currey, London, pp. 90-108.[1811]

Kenny, Bridget (2008): Servicing modernity, White women shop workers on the Rand and changing gendered respectability, 1940-1970, in: African Studies, vol. 67, no. 3, pp. 365-396.[1812]

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Meer, Fatima (ed.) (1990): Black – women – worker, Madiba Publications, Durban.[1828]

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Shefer, Tammy (1991): The gender agenda, women’s struggle in the trade union movement, Conference on women and gender in Southern Africa 30.1.-2.2.1991, paper no. 19, unpublished paper, University of Natal, Durban.[1846]

Shefer, Tammy (1991): COSATU Women’s Forums: Separate to get strong, in: Agenda, no. 9, pp. 53-59.[1847]

Skinner, Caroline / Valodia, Imraan (2003): Local government support for women in the informal economy in Durban, South Africa, in: International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, vol.16, no.3, pp. 431-444.[1843]

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Taylor, Viviene (2001): Globalisation, the disappearing state and poor women, A view from the south, in: Agenda, no.48, pp. 51-60.[1849]

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Verhoef, Grietjie (2002): Stokvels and economic empowerment, The case of African women in South Africa, c.1930-1998, in: Lemire, Beverly / Pearson, Ruth / Campbell, Gail G. (eds.): Women and credit, Researching the past, refiguring the future, Berg, Oxford, pp. 91-116.[1853]

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Yawitch, Joanne (1983): Research report: The incorporation of African women into wage labour, 1950-1980, South African Labour Bulletin, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 82-93.[1859]

economy - Households

Duflo, Esther (2003): Grandmothers and granddaughters, Old age pensions and intrahousehold allocation in South Africa, in: World Bank Economic Review, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-25.[2004]

Dungumaro, Esther (2008): Gender differentials in household structure and socio-economic characteristics in South Africa, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 39, no. 4, pp. 429-451.[2005]

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economy - markets and traders

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Burman, Sandra / Lembete, Nozipho (1996): Building new realities, African women and ROSCAs in urban South Africa, in: Ardener, Shirley / Burman, Sandra (eds.): Money go rounds, The importance of rotating saving and credit associations for women, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 23-47.[2210]

Downing, Jeanne (1995): The growth and dynamics of women entrepreneurs in Southern Africa, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power: The role of women in African economic development, Greenwood Press, Westport, pp. 177-196.[2211]

Fadane, Nommikelo (1998): Women street vendors and housing in Durban, in: Larsson, Anita (ed.): Changing gender relations in Southern Africa, Issues of urban life, Publications of the Institute of Southern African Studies, Roma, pp. 17-23.[2212]

Lund, Francie J./ Skinner, Caroline (1998): Women traders in Durban, Life on the streets, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 17-24.[2213]

Morgenrath, Birgit (1998): Das Ende der Unsichtbarkeit, in: Blätter des IZ3W, p. 32.[2214]

Morgenrath, Birgit (2000): Informeller Sektor und Selbstorganisierung – unverträglich? Das Beispiel der Frauengewerkschaft SEWU aus Südafrika, in: NRO Frauenforum (Hg.): Tagungsdokumentation: überleben im globalen Markt, Zukunft unbezahlter Frauenarbeit, Stuttgart, pp. 56-63.[2215]

Morgenrath, Birgit / Wick, Ingeborg (1993): Vukuzenzele – Selbst ist die Frau, Umbruch in Südafrika, Perspektiven der Frauen, Veröffentlichungen der Anti-Apartheid-Bewegung, Bonn.[2216]

Morgenrath, Birgit / Wick, Ingeborg (1996): Die südafrikanische Frauengewerkschaft SEWU, Arbeit im informellen Sektor, Veröffentlichungen Aktionsbündnis Afrika Süd, Prima Print, Köln.[2217]

Nene, Sbongile Daphne (1984): A survey of African women petty traders and self-employed in town and country in South Africa, in: Muntemba, Shimwayi (ed.): Rural development and women, Geneva, ILO-Publications, pp. 147-154.[2218]

economy - pastoralism

Abrahams, Yvette (1996): Disempowered to consent, Sara Baartman and Khoisan slavery in the nineteenth century Cape Colony and Britain, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 35, pp. 89-114.[2431]

Smith, Andrew / Webley, Lita (2000): Women and men of the Khoekhoen of Southern Africa, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 72-96.[2432]

Webley, Lita (1997): Wives and sisters, Changing gender relations among the Koe pastoralists in Namaqualand, in: Wadley, Lyn (ed.): Our gendered past, Archeological studies of gender in Southern Africa, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 167-208.[2433]

education schooling and tertiary education

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Bank, Leslie (2002): Beyond red and school: Gender, tradition and identity in the rural Eastern Cape, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 631-650.[2804]

Bennett, Jane (2009): Researching the pedagogies of sexualities in South African higher education, in: International Journal of Sexual Health, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 239-252.[2805]

Bhana, Deevia (2005): Violence and gendered negotiations of masculinity among young black school boys in South Africa, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 205-220.[2806]

Bhana, Deevia / Clowes, Lindsay / Morrell, Richard / Shefer, Tamara (2008): The hidden work of caring, Teachers and the maturing AIDS epidemic in diverse secondary schools in Durban, in: Journal of Education, vol. 38, pp. 5-25.[2807]

Bhana, Deevia / Clowes, Lindsay / Morrell, Richard / Shefer, Tamara (2008): Pregnant girls and young parents in South African schools, in: Agenda, no. 76, pp. 78-89.[2808]

Bob, Urmilla (1999): Engendering geography education in South Africa: The need to “put women on the map”, in: South African Geographical Journal, vol. 81, no. 1, pp. 60-65.[2809]

Bradlow, Edna (1993): Women and education in nineteenth century South Africa, The attitudes and experiences of middle-class English-speaking females at the Cape, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 28, pp. 119-150.[2812]

Brookes, Heather et al. (2004): Responses to gender-based violence in schools, in: Dawes, Andrew et al. (eds.): Sexual abuse of young children in Southern Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria, pp. 110-129.[2813]

Budlender, Debbie (1994): Women in tertiary education, in: Lessing, Margaret (ed.): South African women today, Maskew Miller Longman Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 129-138.[2814]

Buthelezi, Thabisile (2003): The invisible females, Analysing gender in the OBE language textbooks for the intermediate phase in South African schools, in: Alternation, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 25-42.[2810]

Buthelezi, Thabisile (2003): Lexical reinforcement and maintenance of gender stereotypes in isiZulu, in: Alternation, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 386-400.[2811]

Chisholm, Linda (1990): Gender and deviance in South African industrial schools and reformatories for girls, 1911-1934, in: Walker, Cherryl (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 293-312.[2815]

Chisholm, Linda / Unterhalter, Elaine (1999): Gender, education and the transition to democracy: Research, theory and policy in South Africa, 1980-1998, in: Transformation, vol. 39, pp. 1-25.[2816]

Craig, A. / Strydom-Richter, L. (1983): Unplanned pregnancies among urban Zulu school children, A summary of the salient results from a preliminary investigation, in: Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 121, no. 4, pp. 239-246.[2817]

Dick, Archie L. (2004): Building a nation of readers? Women's organizations and the politics of reading in South Africa, 1900-1914, in: Historia, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 23-44.[2818]

Du Toit, Brian (1987): Menarche and sexuality among a sample of black South African schoolgirls, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 561-571.[2819]

Erlank, Natasha (2000): ‘Raising up the degraded daughters of Africa’: The provision of education for Xhosa women in the mid-nineteenth century, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 43, pp. 24-38.[2820]

Fuller, Bruce / Liang, Xiaoyan (1999): Which girls stay in school? The influence of family economy, social demands and ethnicity in South Africa, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Casterline, John / Johnson-Kuhn, Jennifer / Haaga, John (eds.): Critical perspectives on schooling and fertility in the developing world, National Academy Press, Washington, pp. 181-215.[2821]

Gaitskell, Deborah (1988): Race, gender and imperialism: A century of black girls’ education in South Africa, in: Mangan, J.A. (ed.): ‘Benefits bestowed’? Education and British imperialism, Manchester University Press, Manchester, 1988, pp. 150-173.[2822]

Gaitskell, Deborah (1994): At home with hegemony? Coercion and consent in African girls’ education for domesticity in South Africa before 1910, in: Engels, Dagmar / Marks, Shula (eds.): Contesting colonial hegemony, State and society in Africa and India, British Academic Press, London, pp. 110-128.[2823]

Gallant, M / Maticka-Tyndale, E. (2004): School-based HIV prevention programmes for African youth, in: Social Science and Medicine, 58, 1, pp. 337-351.[2824]

Gordon, A. / Nkwe, D. / Graven, M. (1998): Gender and education in rural South Africa, in: Bloch, M. / Beoku-Betts, J.A. et al. (eds.): Women and education in Sub-Saharan Africa, Lynne Rienner Publications, Boulder, pp. 229-245.[2825]

Gouws, Amanda / Kritzinger, Andrienetta (1995): Sexual harassment of students, A case study of a South African university, in: South African Sociological Review, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 1-24.[2826]

Graser, R.R. / Winship, W. (eds.) (1991): Prevention of child abuse, A manual for school teachers, Keith Printing, Pietermartizburg.[2827]

Haffejee, S. (2006): Waiting opportunities, Adolescent girls experiences of gender based violence at schools, CSVR, Johannesburg.[2828]

Harrison, A. / Xaba, N. / Kunene, P. (2001): Understanding safe sex, Gender narratives of HIV and pregnancy prevention by rural South African school going youth, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 9, no. 17, pp. 63-71.[2830]

Harrison, Abigail (2002): The social dynamics of adolescent risk for HIV, Using research findings to design a school based intervention, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 43-52.[2829]

Human Rights Watch (2001): Scared at school, Sexual violence against girls in South African schools, Human Rights Watch Publications, New York.[2831]

Ismail, Noorbanoo (1994): South African Indian women and education, in: Lessing, Margaret (ed.): South African women today, Maskew Miller Longman Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 116-128.[2832]

Keyser, Sonya / Purdon, Brett (1995): Surviving rape, New Readers Project, Department of Adult Education, University of Natal, Durban.[2833]

Kotecha, Piyushi (1994): The position of women teachers, in: Agenda, no. 21, pp. 21-35.[2834]

Kuhn, L. et al. (1994): Participation of the school community in AIDS education, An evaluation of a high school programme in South Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 161-171.[2835]

Labode, Modupe (1993): From heathen kraal to Christian home: Anglican mission education and African Christian girls, 1850-1900, in: Bowie, Fiona / Kirkwood, Deborah / Ardener, Shirley (eds.): Women and missions: Past and present, Anthropological and historical perceptions, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 126-144.[2836]

Lambert, John (2004): 'Munition factories... turning out a constant supply of living material', White South African elite boys' schools and the First World War, in: South African Historical Journal, no. 51, pp. 67-86. [2837]

Levett, Ann / Kuhn, Louise (1991): Attitudes toward rape and rapists: A white, English speaking South African student sample, in: South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 32-37.[2838]

Mabokela, Obakeng Reitumetse / Magubane, Zine (eds.) (2005): Race, gender and the status of Black South African women in the academy, Brill Publishers, Leiden.[2839]

Mabunda, P. / Lephalala, M. (2000): Patriarchal practices and their effects in black societies, and the role of women teachers in empowering illiterate women, in: Malherbe, Jeanette / Kleijwegt, Marc / Koen, Elize (eds.): Women, society and constraints, Unisa Press, Pretoria, pp. 120-131.[2840]

Mahlase, Motleke Shirley (1997): The careers of women teachers under apartheid, SAPES Books, Harare.[2841]

Makosana, Nokuzola Z. (2001): Accessing higher education in apartheid South Africa, A gender perspective, in: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, vol. 1, no. 1.[2842]

Mannathoko, Changu (1999): Theoretical perspectives on gender in education, The case of Eastern and Southern Africa, in: International Review of Education, vol. 45, no. 5-6, pp. 445-460.[2844]

Marcus, Tessa (2002): Kissing the cobra, Sexuality and high risk in a generalised epidemic – A case study of White university students, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 1, pp. 23-33.[2843]

Masuku, Nokuthula (1998): Pregnant schoolgirls must ‘go’, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 7-38.[2845]

Mathews, C. / Kuhn, L. et al. (1990): Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about AIDS in township school students in Cape Town, in: South African Medical Journal, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 511-516.[2846]

Morrell, Robert (1994): Boys, gangs, and the making of masculinity in the white secondary schools of Natal, 1880-1930, in: Masculinities, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 56-82.[2847]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2001): HIV/AIDS policies, schools and gender identities, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 51-57.[2848]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2002): The school setting, Opportunities for integrating gender equality and HIV risk reduction interventions, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 11-21.[2849]

Mukasa, Veronica (1999): Talking about sexual harassment in school, in: Agenda, no. 41, pp. 58-60.[2850]

Negrón, Laura A. (2007): Gender and education in post-apartheid South Africa, Possibilities and limitations of the international human rights framework, in: East African Journal of Peace & Human Rights, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 166-189.[2851]

Newfield, Denise (2001): ‘Blessed with the necessity of transformation’, Postgraduate education in South Africa, in: Perry, Susan / Schenk, Celeste (eds.): Eye to eye, Women practicing development across cultures, Zed Books, London, pp. 119-132.[2852]

Niehaus, Isak (2000): Towards a dubious liberation: Masculinity, sexuality and power in South African Lowveld schools, 1953-1999, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 387-408.[2853]

Pandor, Naledi (1994): The position of black women teachers in South Africa, in: Lessing, Margaret (ed.): South African women today, Maskew Miller Longman Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 98-106.[2854]

Rajuilu, Khanya / Burke, Ione (1999): Democratization through adult popular education, A reflection on the resiliance of women from Kwa-Ndebele, South Africa, in: Bystydzienski, Jill M. and Sekhon, Joti (eds.): Democratization and women’s grassroots movements, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 111-128.[2855]

Rehle, Thomas et al. (2005): HIV-positive educators in South African public schools, HSRC Publications, Pretoria.[2856]

Sathiparsad, Reshma / Taylor, Myra / Dlamini, Siyabonga (2008): Patriarchy and family life, Alternative views of male youth in rural South Africa, in: Agenda, vol. 76, pp. 4-16.[2857]

Sehoole, Trevor Chika / Moja, Teboho (2003): Pedagogical issues and gender in cyberspace education, Distance education in South Africa, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 475-496.[2858]

Shindler, Jennifer / Arnott, Angela (1996): Education, in: Budlender, Debbie (ed.): The women’s budget, Idasa Publications, Cape Town, pp. 148-182.[2859]

Shisana, Olive / Simbayi, Leickness (2005): The health of our educators, A focus on HIV/AIDS in South African public schools, HSRC Publications, Pretoria.[2860]

Taylor, Myra / Dlamini, Siyabonga et al. (2002): Self-reported risk behaviour of learners at rural Kwa-Zulu high schools, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 69-74.[2861]

Taylor, Myra / Dlamini, Siyabonga et al. (2003): Understanding high school students risk behaviour to help reduce the HIV/AIDS epidemic in KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Journal of School Health, vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 97-100.[2862]

Thomas, Duncan (1999): Fertility, education and resources in South Africa, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Casterline, John / Johnson-Kuhn, Jennifer / Haaga, John (eds.): Critical perspectives on schooling and fertility in the developing world, National Academy Press, Washington, pp. 138-180.[2863]

Unterhalter, Elaine (1990): The impact of apartheid on women’s education in South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, No. 48, pp. 66-75.[2864]

Unterhalter, Elaine (1992): Can education overcome women’s subordinate position in the occupational structure? in: Unterhalter, Elaine / Wolpe, Harold / Thozamile, Botha (eds.): Education in a future South Africa, Policy issues for transformation, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 65-84.[2865]

Unterhalter, Elaine (1998): Economic rationality or social justice? Gender, the national qualifications framework and educational reform in South Africa, 1989-1996, in: Cambridge Journal of Education, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 351-368.[2866]

Unterhalter, Elaine (1999): The schooling of South African girls, in: Heward, Christine / Bunwaree, Sheila (eds.): Gender, education and development, Beyond access to empowerment, Zed Books, London, pp. 49-64.[2867]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2000): Remembering and forgetting, Constructions of education gender reform in autobiography and policy texts of the South Africa in transition, in: History in Education, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 457-472.[2868]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2002): Gender, race and different lives, South African women teachers’ autobiographies and the analysis of education change, in: Kallaway, P (ed.): The history of education under apartheid 1948-1994, The doors of learning and culture shall be opened, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., pp. 243-255.[2869]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2007): Truth rather than justice? Historical narratives, gender, and public education in South Africa, in: Stolten, Hans Erik (ed.): History making and present day politics, The meaning of collective memory in South Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 98-113.[2870]

Valodia, Imraan (2001): Education policy and women’s informal work in South Africa, in: Development and Change, vol. 32, pp. 871-892.[2871]

Van Vollenhoven, W. (2003): How school governing bodies in South Africa understand and respond to HIV/AIDS, in: South African Journal of Education, vol. 23, pp. 242-247.[2872]

Visser, M.J. (2005): Life skills training on HIV/AIDS preventive strategy in secondary schools, Evaluation of a large scale implementation process, in: Sahara, Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 203-216.[2873]

Walters, Shirley (1988): Training gender-sensitive adult educators in South Africa, in: Walters, Shirley / Manicom, Linzi (eds.): Gender in popular education, Methods of empowerment, Zed Books, London, pp. 23-39.[2874]

Walters, Shirley (1991): Her words on her lips: Gender and popular education in South Africa, in: ASBAE Courier, no. 52, pp. 5-20.[2875]

Walters, Shirley (1993): Training gender-sensitive and feminist adult educators in South Africa: An emerging curriculum, in: Perspectives in Education, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 115-130.[2876]

Wolpe, Ann Marie (1994): Adult education and women’s needs, A study of some community organisations in the Western Cape, Cace Publications, Cape Town.[2877]

health - fgc fgm

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Abdool Karim Q. / Abdool Karim, S.S. (eds.) (2005): HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[3706]

Abdool Karim, Q. / Abdool Karim, Salim S. / Nkomokazi, J. (1991): Sexual behaviour and knowledge of AIDS among urban black mothers, Implications for AIDS intervention programmes, in: South African Medical Journal vol. 80, no. 7, pp. 340-343.[3703]

Abdool Karim, Q. / Abdool Karim, Salim S. / Soldan, K. / Zondi, Maria (1995): Reducing the risk of HIV infection among South African sex workers, Socioeconomic and gender barriers, in: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 85, no. 11, pp. 1521-1525.[3704]

Abdool Karim, Q. / Frohlich, J. (2000): Women try to protect themselves from HIV/AIDS in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in: Turshen, Meredeth (ed.): African women's health, Africa World Press, Trenton, New Jersey.[3705]

Abrahams, Naeme / Jewkes, Rachel / Mvo, Zodumo (2002): Indigenous healing practices and self-mediation amongst pregnant women in Cape Town, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 79-86.[3707]

Akintola, Olagoke (2008): Unpaid HIV/AIDS care in Southern Africa, Forms, context, and implications, in: Feminist Economies, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 117-147.[3711]

Albertyn, Catherine (2000): Using rights and the law to reduce women's vulnerability to HIV, in: Canadian HIV/AIDS Policy and Law Review, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 72-79.[3708]

Albertyn, Catherine (2003): Contesting democracy, HIV/AIDS and the achievement of gender equality in South Africa, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 595-615.[3709]

Albertyn, Catherine / Hassim, Shireen (2003): The boundaries of democracy, Gender, HIV and culture, in: Everatt, D. / Maphai, V. (ed.): The real state of the nation, South Africa after 1990, Johannesburg, pp. 137-164.[3710]

Ansell, Nicola / van Blerk, Lorraine (2004): HIV/AIDS and children’s migration in Southern Africa, Southern African Migration Project, IDASA, Cape Town.[3713]

Ansell, Nicola / Young, L. (2004): Enabling households to support successful migration of AIDS orphans in Southern Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 3-10.[3712]

Ashforth, Adam (2004): AIDS and witchcraft in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Das, Veena / Poole, Deborah (eds.): Anthropology at the margins of the state, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 141-164.[3714]

Attree, L. (2004): Representations of HIV and AIDS in literature from Zimbabwe and South Africa, in: Weiss, B. (ed.): The end of unheard narratives, Contemporary perspectives on Southern African Literatures, Kalliope, London, pp. 147-158.[3715]

Baimu, Evarist (2002): The Government's obligation to provide anti-retrovirtals to HIV-positive pregnant women in an African human rights context, The South African nevirapine case, in: African Human Rights Law Journal, vol 2, no. 1, pp. 160-174.[3716]

Beksinska, Mags E. / Rees, Helen V. / Ballard, R.C. et al. (2005): Risk factors for HIV infection among sex workers in Johannesburg, South Africa, in: International Journal of STD and AIDS, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 256-261.[3717]

Bhana, Deevia / Clowes, Lindsay / Morrell, Richard / Shefer, Tamara (2008): The hidden work of caring, Teachers and the maturing AISD epidemic in diverse secondary schools in Durban, in: Journal of Education, vol. 38, pp. 5-25.[3718]

Bhana, Deevia / Clowes, Lindsay / Morrell, Richard / Shefer, Tamara (2008): Pregnant girls and young parents in South African schools, in: Agenda, no. 76, pp. 78-89.[3719]

Bobat, Raziya / Moodley, Dhayendree / Coutsoudis, Anna / Coovadia, Hoosen M. (1997): Breastfeeding by HIV-1 infected women and outcome in their infants, A cohort study from Durban, South Africa, in: AIDS, vol. 11, no. 13, pp.1627-1633.[3720]

Booysen, Frederik (2004): HIV/AIDS, poverty and risky sexual behaviour in South Africa, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 57-67.[3721]

Burgard, Sarah (2004): Factors associated with contraceptive use in late- and post-apartheid South Africa, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 91-104.[3722]

Butler, Anthony (2005): South Africa’s HIV/AIDS policy, 1994-2004, How can it be explained? In: African Affairs, no. 104/417, pp. 591-614.[3723]

Caesar-Katsenga, Mary / Myburg, Marietjie (2007): Parliament, politics and AIDS, A comparative study of five African countries, IDASA-Publications, Cape Town.[3730]

Campbell, Catherine (1997): Migrancy, masculine identities and AIDS, The psychological context of HIV transmission on the South African gold mines, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 273-281.[3724]

Campbell, Catherine (2000): Selling sex in the time of AIDS: The psychological context of condome use by sex workers on a South African gold mine, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 50, pp. 479-494.[3725]

Campbell, Catherine (2001): ‘Going underground and going after women’, Masculinity and HIV transmission amongst black workers on the gold mines, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 275-286.[3726]

Campbell, Catherine / MacPhail, Catherine (2001): ‘I think condoms are good but, aai, I hate those things’: Condome use among adolescents and young people in a Southern African township, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 52, pp. 1613-1627.[3727]

Campbell, Catherine / MacPhail, Catherine (2002): Peer education, gender and development of critical consciousness, Participatory HIV prevention by South African youth, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 55, pp. 331-345.[3728]

Campbell, Catherine / Mzaidume, Yodwa / Williams, Brian (1998): Gender as an obstacle to condome use, HIV prevention amongst commercial sex workers in a mining community, in: Agenda, no. 39, pp. 50-57.[3729]

Chege, Jane (2005): Interventions linking gender relations and violence with reproductive health and HIV, Rationale, effectiveness and gaps, in: Agenda, Special Focus, pp. 114-123.[3731]

Chirwa, Wiseman Chijere (1998): Aliens and AIDS in Southern Africa, The Malawi-South Africa debate, in: African Affairs, vol. 97, pp. 53-79.[3732]

Cleland, John / Maharaj, Pranitha (2004): Condom use within marital and cohabiting partnerships in Kwa-Zulu-Natal, South Africa, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 116-124.[3733]

Coleman, Rosalind / Seidel, Gill (1999): Gender, disclosure, care and decision-making in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, A pilot programme using story telling techniques, in: Aggleton, Peter / Hart, Graham / Davies, Pieter (eds.): Families and communities responding to AIDS, UCL Press, London, pp. 53-66.[3734]

Collins, T. / Stadler, J. (2000): Love, passion and play, Sexual meaning among youth in the Northern Province of South Africa, in: Journal des Anthropologies, vol. 82 no. 3, pp. 325-337.[3735]

Connolly, Catherine A. / Ramjee, Gita / Sturm, Adriann W. / Abdool Karim, Salim S. (2002): Incidence of sexually transmitted infections among HIV-positive sex workers in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, vol. 29, no. 11, pp. 721-724.[3736]

Cronje, H.S. / Joubert, G. / Muir, A. et al. (1994): Prevalence of vaginitis, syphilis and HIV infection in women in the Orange Free State, in: South African Medical Journal, vol. 84, no. 9, pp. 602-605.[3737]

Crush, J. / Grant, Miriam / Frayne, Bruce (2007): Linking migration, HIV/AIDS and urban food security in Southern and Eastern Africa, African Migration and Development Series, no. 3, IDASA, Cape Town.[3738]

Dawes, Andrew et al. (eds.) (2004): Sexual abuse of young children in Southern Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[3739]

De Bruyn, Maria (2004): Living with HIV, Challenges in reproductive health care in South Africa, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 92-98.[3740]

Delius, Peter / Glaser, Cliff (2005): Sex, disease and stigma in South Africa, Historical perspectives, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, 4, 1, pp. 29-36.[3741]

Dunkle, K.L. / Jewkes, R.K. et al. (2004): Transactional sex among women in Soweto, South Africa, Prevalence, risk factors and association with HIV infection, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 1581-1592.[3744]

Dunkle, K.L. / Jewkes, R.K. et al. (2006): Perpetration of partner violence and HIV risk behaviour of young men in the rural Eastern Cape, in: AIDS, 20, pp. 2017-2024.[3745]

Dunkle, K.L. et al. (2004): Prevalence and patterns of gender-based violence and revictimization among women attending antenatal clinics in Soweto, South Africa, in: American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 160, no. 3, pp. 230-239.[3742]

Dunkle, K.L. et al. (2004): Gender-based violence, relationship power, and risk of HIV infection in women attending antenatal clinics in South Africa, in: The Lancet, no. 9419, pp. 1415-1421.[3743]

Eaton, L. / Flishera, J. et al. (2003): Unsafe sexual behaviour in South African youth, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 149-165.[3746]

Etiebet, M.A. (2004): Integrating prevention of mother-child transmission into antenatal care, Learning from the experiences of women in South Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 37-46.[3747]

Fassin, Didier (2007): When bodies remember, Experiences and politics of AIDS in South Africa, University of California University Press, Berkeley.[3748]

Fourie, Peter (2006): The political management of HIV and AIDS in South Africa, Palgrave Publishing, Houndsmills / London.[3749]

Fox, A.M. et al. (2007): In their own voices, A qualitative study of women’s risk for intimate partner violence and HIV in South Africa, in: Violence against Women, 13, 6, pp. 583-602.[3750]

Friedman, S. / Mottiar, S. (2006): Seeking the ground, The Treatment Action Campaign and the politics of morality, in: Ballard, R. / Habib, A. / Valodia, I. (eds.): Voices of protest, Social movements in post-apartheid South Africa, University of Kwa Zulu Natal Press, Scottsville, pp. 23-44.[3751]

Galloway, Michelle R. (2001): Women, HIV risk and vaccines in a rural South African community, in: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, vol. 1, no. 2.[3752]

Garner, Robert (2000): Safe sects? Dynamic religion and AIDS in South Africa, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 41-69.[3753]

Gernholz, Liesl / Richter, Marlise (2002): Young women’s access to reproductive health-care services in the context of HIV, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 99-105.[3754]

Gibson, Diana (2007): 'I have plans': scrutinising the meaning, production and sustaining of hope in safe sexual practices among young men in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, in: Anthropology Southern Africa, vol. 30, no. 1-2, pp. 1-10.[3755]

Gouws, Amanda (2003): Contesting democracy, HIV/AIDS and the achievements of gender equality in South Africa, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 29, pp. 955-975.[3756]

Gow, Jeff / Desmond, Chris (eds.) (2002): Impacts and interventions, The HIV/AIDS epidemic and the children of South Africa, University of Natal Press, Scottsville.[3757]

Greig, Alan / Peacock, Dean / Jewkes, Rachel / Msimang, Sisonke (2008): Gender and AIDS, Time to act, in: AIDS, vol. 22, suppl. 2, pp. 35-43.[3758]

Hamilton, Georgina (1998): Virgin testing, One answer to the AIDS epidemic, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 62-66.[3759]

Hardy, Chloe / Richter, Marlise (2006): Disability grant or antiretrovirals? A quandary for people with HIV/AIDS in South Africa, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 85-96.[3760]

Harrison, A. / Xaba, N. / Kunene, P. (2001): Understanding safe sex, Gender narratives of HIV and pregnancy prevention by rural South African school going youth, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 9, no. 17, pp. 63-71.[3762]

Harrison, A. / Xaba, N. / Kunene, P. (2001): Understanding young women’s risk for HIV/AIDS, Adolescent sexuality and vulnerability in KwaZulu/Natal, in: Society in Transition, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 67-79.[3763]

Harrison, Abigail (2002): The social dynamics of adolescent risk for HIV, Using research findings to design a school based intervention, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 43-52.[3761]

Haywood, Mark (2009): South Africa’s Treatment Action Campaign, Combating law and social mobilization to realize the right to health, in: Journal of Human Rights Practices, vol. 1, pp. 14-36.[3764]

Heinecken, Lindy (2003): Facing a mercyless enemy, HIV/AIDS and the South African armed forces, in: Armed Forces and Society, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 281-300.[3765]

Hoosen, Sarah / Collins, Anthony (2004): Sex, sexuality and sickness, Discourses of gender and HIV/AIDS among KwaZulu-Natal women, in: South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 487-505.[3766]

Human Rights Watch (1997): South Africa, Violence against women and the medico legal system, Human Rights Watch Publications, vol. 9, no. 4A, New York.[3767]

Human Rights Watch (2004): Deadly delay, South Africa’s efforts to prevent HIV in survivors of sexual violence, Human Rights Watch Publications, vol. 16, no. 3 (A), New York.[3768]

Human Science Research Council / International Centre for Research on Women / Associates for Develop (2008): Women’s property rights, HIV and AIDS, and domestic violence, Research Findings from two districts in South Africa and Uganda, HSRC Publication, Pretoria.[3769]

Hunter, Mark (2002): The materiality of everyday sex, Thinking beyond prostitution, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 99-120.[3770]

Hunter, Mark (2004): Masculinities, multiple sex partners and HIV/AIDS, The Making and unmaking of Isoka in KwaZulu-Natal, in: Transformation, vol. 54, pp. 123-153.[3771]

Hunter, Mark (2010): Love in times of AIDS, Inequality, gender, and rights in South Africa, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [3772]

Hussey, G. / Etiebet, M.A. / Fransman, D. (2004): Integrating prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission into antenatal care, Learning from the experiences of women in South Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 37-46.[3773]

Izumi, Kaori (2007): Reclaiming our lives, HIV and AIDS, Women’s land and property rights and livelihood in Southern and Eastern Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[3774]

Jewkes, R. / Dunkle, K. et al. (2006): Perpetration of partner violence and HiV risk behaviour among young men in the rural Eeastern Cape, in: AIDS, 20, pp. 2017-2024.[3779]

Jewkes, R. / Dunkle, K. et al. (2006): Factors associated with HIV sero-status in young rural South African women, Connections between intimate partner violence and HIV, International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 35, 6, pp. 1461-1468.[3780]

Jewkes, Rachel (2001): Reflections on gender violence in the South African public health agenda, in: Development, vol. 44, no .3, pp. 64-68.[3775]

Jewkes, Rachel (2001): The prevalence of emotional, physical and sexual abuse of women in three South African provinces, in: South African Medical Journal, vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 421-428.[3776]

Jewkes, Rachel / Christophides, N. et al. (2007): Vezimfihlo, A training manual for addressing gender-based violence in VCT, Medical Research Council, Pretoria / Cape Town.[3778]

Jewkes, Rachel et al. (2001): Rape of girls in South Africa, in: Lancet, 359, pp. 310-320.[3777]

Jewkes, Rachel et al. (2008): Evaluating “Stepping stones”, Medical Research Council, Cape Town / Pretoria.[3782]

Jewkes, Rachel K. / Levin, Jonathan / Penn-Kekana, L. (2003): Gender inequalities, intimate partnership violence and HIV preventive practices, Findings of a South African cross-sectional study, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 125-134.[3781]

Jochelson, Karen / Mothibeli, Monyaola / Leger, Jean-Patrick (1991): Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and migrant labor in South Africa, in: International Journal of Health Services, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 157-173.[3783]

Kahn, Lauren (2006): Narratives of sexual abstinence, A qualitative study of female adolescents in Cape Town, in: Social Dynamics, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 75-101.[3784]

Kalichman, C. et al. (2007): Sexual assault, sexual risk and gender attitudes in a country sample of South Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 20-27.[3785]

Kalichman, S.C. / Simbayi, L.C. (2004): Sexual assault history and risks for sexually transmitted infections among women in an African township in Cape Town, South Africa, in: AIDS Care, Psychological and socio-medical aspects of HIV/AIDS, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 681-689.[3786]

Karim, Q. / Karim S. (2005): HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[3787]

Karim, Q. / Karim, S. / Dipdata, M. et al. (1995): Reducing the risk of HIV-infection among South African sex workers, Socio-economic and gender barriers, in: American Journal of Public Health, vol. 85, no. 11, pp. 1521-1525.[3788]

Kim, Julia (2003): Rape and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis, Addressing the dual epidemics in South Africa, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 11, no. 22, pp. 101-112.[3789]

Kistner, Ulrike (2003): Commissioning and contesting post-apartheid’s human rights, HV/AIDS – racism – truth and reconciliation, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[3790]

Kuo, Caroline / Operario, Don (2007): Challenging dominant policy paradigms of care for children orphaned by AIDS, Dynamic patterns of care in Kwa-Zulu, Republic of South Africa, Working Paper no. 4, HEARD, University of Kwa Zulu Natal, Durban.[3791]

Kynoch, Gary (2010): Love in the times of AIDS, Inequality, gender, and rights in South Africa, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[3792]

Le Gaetene, Gange (2004): Taking the bull by the horns, Working with young men on HIV/AIDS in South Africa, in: Ruxton, Sandy (ed.): Gender equality and men, Learning from practice, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 101-112.[3793]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (1997): Infect one, infect all, Zulu youth response to the AIDS epidemic in South Africa, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 363-380.[3794]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (2001): Demonising women in the era of AIDS, On the relationship between cultural constructions of both HIV/AIDS and feminity, in: Society in Transition, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 38-41.[3795]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (2001): Virginity testing, Managing sexuality in a maturing HIV/AIDS epidemic, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 533-552.[3796]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (2002): On the virgin cleansing myth, Gendered bodies, AIDS and ethno-medicine, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, 1, pp. 87-95.[3797]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (2003): Protecting girlhood? Virginity revivals in the era of AIDS, in: Agenda, no. 56, pp. 16-25.[3798]

Levine, S. / Ross, F. (2002): Perceptions of attitudes to HIV/AIDS among young adults in Cape Town, in: Social Dynamics, 28, 1, pp. 89-108.[3799]

Lurie, M. / Harrison, A. et al. (1997): Circular migration and sexual partnering in rural Kwa-Zulu/Natal, South Africa, Implications for the spread of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 15-24.[3800]

Madlala, Ntokozo (2000): Organisations call for action on HIV/AIDS and violence against women, in: Agenda, no. 46, pp. 31-32[3801]

Maharaj, Pranitha (2001): Male attitudes to family planning in the era of HIV/AIDS, Evidence from KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 245-258.[3802]

Maharaj, Pranitha / Cleland, John (2004): Condome use within marital and cohabiting partnerships in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 116-124.[3803]

Maharaj, Pranitha / Cleland, John (2005): Risk perception and condome use among married or cohabiting couples in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 24-29.[3804]

Makubalo, L.E. / Levin, J. /Mulumba, R. (2000): Survey of HIV prevalence among women attending antenatal clinics in South Africa, 1999, in: AIDS Bulletin, pp. 9-10.[3805]

Mantell, J.E. (2000): Introducing the female condome through the public health sector, Experiences from South Africa, in: AIDS Care, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 589-591.[3806]

Marcus, Tessa / Oellermann, Karen / Levin, Nonceba (1995): AIDS and the highways, Sex workers and truck drivers in KwaZulu-Natal, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 80-85.[3807]

Marks, Shula (2002): An epidemic waiting to happen? The spread of HIV/AIDS in South Africa in social and historical perspective, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 13-26.[3808]

Marseille, Elliot et al. (2001): Cost-effectiveness of female condom in preventing HIV and STDs in commercial sex workers in rural South Africa, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 52, pp. 135-148.[3809]

Marshall, Mandy / Taylor, Nigel (2006): Tackling HIV and AIDS with faith-based communities, Learning from attitudes on gender relations and sexual rights within evangelical churches in Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 363-374.[3810]

Martens, Jeremy (2001): ‘Almost a public calamity’, Prostitutes, ‘nurse-boys’, and attempts to control veneral diseases in Natal, 1886-1890, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 45, pp. 27-52.[3811]

Meel, B.L. (2003): A study of the prevalence of HIV seropositivity among rape survivals in Transkei, South Africa, in: Journal of Clinical Forensic Medicine, vol. 10, issue 2, pp. 65-70.[3812]

Meerkotter, Anneke et al. (2005): The impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic on women’s citizenship in South Africa, in: Gouws, A. (ed.): (Un)thinking citizenship, Feminist debates in contemporary South Africa, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot, pp. 157-176.[3813]

Miles, Lesley (1992): Women, AIDS and heterosexual negotiation, A discourse analysis, in: Agenda, no. 15, pp. 14-26.[3814]

Mitchell, Claudia / Smith, Ann (2001): Changing the picture, Youth, gender and HIV/AIDS prevention campaign in South Africa, in: Canadian Women Studies, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 56-62.[3815]

Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi (2006): Partial truths: Representations of teenage pregnancy in research, in: Anthropology Southern Africa, vol. 29, no. 3/4, pp. 96-104.[3816]

Moleon, Marie-Monique (2000): Women and AIDS in South Africa, A challenge to the new national AIDS programme, in: Africa Insight, vol. 37, no. 3-4, pp. 39-43.[3817]

Morgan, Jonathan (2003): Long life, Positive HIV stories, Double Storey Books, Cape Town.[3818]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2001): HIV/AIDS policies, schools and gender identities, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 51-57.[3819]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2002): The school setting, Opportunities for integrating gender equality and HIV risk reduction interventions, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 11-21.[3820]

Nasimulu, P. (2004): ‘It’s a matter of trust’, Young people in South Africa and the discourse of HIV/AIDS prevention, in: Alternation, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 454-473.[3821]

Nattrass, Nicoli (2004): The moral economy of AIDS in South Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[3822]

Nattrass, Nicoli (2007): AIDS denialism and the struggle for antiretrovirals in South Africa, Univeristy of Kwa Zulu Natal Press, Durban.[3823]

Nattrass, Nicoli (2008): AIDS and the scientific governance of medicine in post-apartheid South Africa, in: African Affairs, vol. 107, no. 427, pp. 157-176.[3824]

Ncama, Busisiwe / Uys, Leana (2006): Community impact of HIV status disclosure through an integrated community home-based care programme, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 265-271.[3825]

Ndinga-Muvumba, Angela / Pharoah, Robyn (2008): HIV/AIDS and society in South Africa, University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, Scottsville.[3826]

Niehaus, Isak (2002): Renegotiating masculinity in the South African lowveld, Narratives of male-male sex in labour compounds and in prison, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 77-97.[3827]

Niehaus, Isak (2005): Dr. Wouter Basson, Amreicans, and the wild beasts, Men’s conspiracy theories of HIV/AIDS in the South African lowveld, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 24, pp. 179-208.[3828]

Olley, Benjamin (2006): Psychological distress in the first year after diagnosis of HIV infection among women in South Africa, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 207-215[3829]

Oludele, Akinboade (2008): Gender, HIV/AIDS, land restitution and survial strategies in the Capricorn District of South Africa, in: International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35, no. 11, pp. 857-877.[3830]

Onyejekwe, Chineze (2004): The interrelationship between gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS in South Africa, in: Journal of International Women’s Studies, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 34-40.[3831]

Overland, Lene (2004): Monitoring HIV/AIDS reporting through the gender lens, Media Watch Publications, Cape Town.[3832]

Page, Sam (2001): Promoting the survival of rural mothers with HIV/AIDS, A development strategy for Southern Africa, in: Development, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 40-46.[3833]

Phiri, Isabel / Haddad, Beverly / Masenya, Madipoane (eds.) (2003): African women, HIV/AIDS and faith communities, Cluster Publications, Cape Town.[3834]

Pithouse, Kathleen (2004): Look forward, look back, and look around you: Young South African women on the path of HIV/AIDS activism, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 22-37.[3835]

Posel, Deborah (2005): Sex, death and the fate of the nation, Reflections on the politization of sexuality in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Africa, vol. 75, no. 2, pp. 125-153.[3836]

Poulsen, Helen (2006): The gendered impact of HIV/AIDS on education in South Africa and Swaziland, Save the Children’s experiences, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 47-56.[3837]

Preston-Whyte, Eleanor (1994): Gender and the lost generation, The dynamics of HIV transmission among black South African teenagers in Kwa Zulu, Natal, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 4, pp. 241-255.[3838]

Prince, Bridgette (eds.) (2007): Skills-building for gender mainstreaming in HIV/AIDS, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[3839]

Pronyk, P.M. / Hargraeves, J.R. et al. (2006): Effects of a structural intervention for the prevention of intimate-partner violence and HIV in rural South Africa, A cluster randomised trial, in: Lancet, 368, S.1973-1983.[3840]

Quakisa, Mpine (2001): The portrayal of HIV positive women in the South African media, in: Siren News, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 27-39.[3841]

Rasebotsa, Nobanta / Samuelson, Meg / Kylie, Thomas (eds.) (2004): Nobody ever said AIDS, Stories and poems from Southern Africa, Kwela Books, 2004.[3842]

Reddy, Shakila (2004): Safe sex or safe love? Competing discourses within the context of HIV/AIDS, in: Alternation, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 440-453.[3843]

Reddy, Vasu / Louw, Ronald (2002): Black and gay, Perceptions and interventions around HIV in Durban, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 89-95.[3844]

Rehle, Thomas / Shisana, Olive (2005): The impact of anti-retroviral treatment on AIDS morality, A study focusing on educators in South African public schools, HSRC Publications, Pretoria.[3845]

Richter, Marlise (2004): Pepping up the public health care system for rape survivors, AIDS activism and advocacy, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 47-54.[3846]

Robins, Steven (2004): ‘Long live Zakie, Long live’: AIDS activism, science and citizenship after Apartheid, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 651-672.[3849]

Roehrs, Stefanie (2007): Positive or negative? Compulsory HIV testing of alleged sexual offenders, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 20, pp. 31-36.[3847]

Roehrs, Stefanie (2007): Implementing the unfeasible, Compulsory HIV testing for alleged sexual offenders, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 22, pp. 27-32.[3848]

Russell, Diana (2001): AIDS as mass femicide, Focus on South Africa, in: Russell, Diana / Harmes, Roberta (eds.): Feminicide in global perspective, Teachers College Press, New York, pp. 100-110.[3850]

Sapire, K. (1995): The female condome, Femidom, A study of user acceptability, in: South African Medical Journal, vol. 85, no. 10, pp. 1081-1084.[3851]

Schneider, Helen (1994): Sexually transmitted diseases, in: Agenda, no. 20, pp. 80-83.[3852]

Scorgie, Fiona (2002): Virginity testing and the politics of sexual responsibility, Implications of AIDS intervention, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 55-75.[3853]

Seidel, Gill (1999): New policy guidelines in South Africa for HIV positive women who breastfeed, in: Women’s Global Network for Reproductive Rights, 1, pp. 18-22.[3854]

Seidel, Gill (2000): Reconceptualizing issues around HIV and breastfeeding advice, Findings from KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 86, pp. 501-518.[3855]

Seidel, Gill / Coleman, Rosalind (1999): Gender, disclosure, care and decision-making in KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Aggleton, Peter / Hart, Graham / Davies, Peter (eds.): Families and communities responding to Aids, UCL Press, London, pp. 53-66.[3856]

Selikow, Terry-Ann / Zulu,, Bheki / Cedras, Eugene (2002): The ingagara, the regte and the cherry, HIV/AIDS and youth culture in contemporary urban townships, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 22-32.[3857]

Strebel, Anna (1992): “There is absolutely nothing I can do, just believe in god”, South African women with AIDS, in: Agenda, no. 12, pp. 50-62.[3858]

Strebel, Anna (1995): Whose epidemic is it? Reviewing the literature on women and AIDS, in: South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 12-20.[3859]

Susser, Ida (2000): Women, AIDS and the female condome, in: Mwaria, Cheryl (ed.): African visions, Literacy images, political change, and social struggle in contemporary Africa, Greenwood Press, Westport, pp. 137-152.[3860]

Susser, Ida (2009): AIDS, sex, and culture, Global politics and survival in Southern Africa, Wiley and Blackwell Publishers, New York.[3861]

Swart-Kruger, Jill / Richter, Linda (1997): AIDS related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among South African street youth, Reflections on power, sexuality and autonomous self, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 45, no. 6, pp. 957-966.[3862]

Tallis, Vicky (1998): The politics of vulnerability, Women and the HIV/AIDS epidemic, in: Development Update, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 88-97.[3863]

Tallis, Vicky (2000): Gendering the response to HIV/AIDS: Challenging gender inequality, in: Agenda, no. 44, pp. 58-66.[3864]

Taylor, Myra / Dlamini, Siyabonga et al. (2002): Self-reported risk behaviour of learners at rural Kwa-Zulu high schools, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 69-74.[3865]

Thorpe, Mark (2002): Masculinity in an HIV intervention, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 61-68.[3867]

Thronton, Robert (2008): Unimagined community, Sex, networks and AIDS in Uganda and South Africa, University of California Press, Berkeley.[3866]

Tsampiras, Carla (2008): Not so 'gay' after all, Constructing (homo)sexuality in AIDS research in the South African Medical Journal, 1980-1990, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 477-499.[3868]

Van Graan, Engela Van der Walt and Mada Watson (2007): Community-based care of children with HIV in Potchefstroom, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 305-313.[3869]

van Rensburg, Jansen (2007): A comprehensive programme addressing HIV/AIDS and gender based violence, in: Sahara, 4, 3, pp. 695-706.[3870]

Vandormael, Alain (2007): The TAC's 'intellectual campaign' (2000-2004), Social movements and epistemic communities Politikon, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 217-233.[3871]

Varga, C.A. (1997): The condome conundrum, Barriers to condome use among commercial sex workers in Durban, South Africa, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, 1, pp. 74-84.[3872]

Varga, C.A. (1997): Sexual decision making and negotiation in the mids of AIDS, Youth in KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Health Transition Review, 7, suppl. 2, pp. 13-40.[3873]

Vetten, Lisa / Bhana, Kailash (2001): A preliminary investigation into the links between violence against women and HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Publications of the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Johannesburg.[3874]

Vincent, Louise (2008): Cutting tradition, The political regulation of traditional circumcision rites in South Africa’s liberal democratic order, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 77-91.[3875]

Visser, M.J. (2005): Life skills training on HIV/AIDS preventive strategy in secondary schools, Evaluation of a large scale implementation process, in: Sahara, Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 203-216.[3876]

Walker, Liz / Gilbert, L. (2001): Women pay the price, HIV/AIDS and social inequalities in South Africa, in: South African Labour Bulletin, vol.25, no.1, pp. 76-82.[3877]

Walker, Liz / Gilbert, L. (2002): HIV/AIDS, South African women at risk, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 1, pp. 75-85.[3878]

Walsh, S. / Mitchell, C. (2006): I’m too young to die, HIV, masculinity, danger and desire in urban South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 57-68.[3879]

Whiteside, Alan (2007): The role of pregnancy intention in HIV prevention in South Africa: a proposed model for policy and practice, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 159-165.[3884]

Whiteside, Alan / Sunter, Clem (2000): AIDS, The challenge for South Africa, Tafelberg Publishers, Cape Town.[3885]

Williams, B. / Gouws, E. / Karim, Abdool S. (2002): Spaces of vulnerability, Migration and HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Southern African Migration Project, Migration Policy Series, no. 24, IDASA, Cape Town.[3880]

Wojcicki, Janet (2001): An acceptance of violence against sex workers and women who exchange money, Survey results from Gauteng Province and implications for HIV prevention, in: AIDS Bulletin, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 8-13.[3881]

Wojcicki, Janet (2002): Commercial sex work or Ukuphanda? Sex for money exchange in Soweto and Hamanskraal area, in: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 339-370.[3882]

Wojcicki, Janet Maria / Malala, Josephine (2001): Condome use, power and HIV/AIDS risk: Sex workers bargain for survival in Hillbrow/Joubert Park/Berea, Johannesburg, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 53, pp. 99-121.[3883]

Yamauchi, F. / Buthelezi, T. / Velia, M. (2006): Gender, labour, and prime-age adult mortality, Evidence from South Africa, FCND Discussion Paper, IFPRI, Washington D.C.[3886]

Youde, Jeremy (2007): AIDS, South Africa and the politics of knowledge, Ashgate Publishing, Aldershot.[3887]

Zuma, Khangelani / Gouws, Eleanor / Williams, Brian G. et al. (2003): Risk factors for HIV infection among young women in Carletonville, South Africa, Migration, demography and sexually transmitted diseases, in: International Journal of STD and AIDS, vol. 14, no. 12, pp. 814-817.[3888]

health - reproduction and fertility

Camlin, Carol S. / Garenne, Michel / Moultrie, Tom A. (2004): Fertility trend and pattern in a rural area of South Africa in the context of HIV/AIDS, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 38-54.[4801]

Craig, A. / Strydom-Richter, L. (1983): Unplanned pregnancies among urban Zulu school children, A summary of the salient results from a preliminary investigation, in: Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 121, no. 4, pp. 239-246.[4802]

Du Toit, Brian (1987): Menarche and sexuality among a sample of black South African schoolgirls, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 24, no. 7, pp. 561-571.[4803]

Dyer, S. J. / Abrahams, N. et al. (2004): You are a man because you have children, Experiences, reproductive health knowledge and treatment seeking behaviour among men suffering from couple infertility, in: Human Reproduction, 19, 4, pp. 960-967.[4804]

Dyer, S. J. / Abrahams, N. et al. (2005): Psychological distress among women suffering from couple infertility in South Africa, A quantitative assessment, in: Human Reproduction, 20, 7, pp. 1938-1943.[4805]

Gibson, Diana (2007): 'I have plans': Scrutinising the meaning, production and sustaining of hope in safe sexual practices among young men in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, in: Anthropology Southern Africa, vol. 30, no. 1-2, pp.1-10.[4806]

Henderson, Patti (1992): Silence, sex and authority, The contradictions of young girls’s sexuality in New Crossroads, Cape Town, in: VENA Journal, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 33-39.[4807]

Hlkatshwayo, Sihle (2004): Infertility among black South African women, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 146-153.[4808]

Human Science Research Council (2003): Fertility, Current South African issues on poverty, HIV/AIDS and youth, Publications of the Human Science Research Council, Pretoria.[4809]

Jewkes, Rachel / Brown, H. et al. (2002): Prevalence of morbidity associated with abortion before and after legislation in South Africa, in: British Medical Journal, 324, pp. 1252-1253.[4810]

Jewkes, Rachel / Brown, H. et al. (2003): Implementation of South Africa’s 1996 Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act, Service provisions after three years, in: Studies in Family Planning, 34, 4, pp. 277-284.[4811]

Jewkes, Rachel / Gumede, T. et al. (2005): Why are women still aborting outside designated facilities in metropolitan South Africa, in: British Journal of Obstetics and Gynaecology, 112, pp. 1236-1242.[4812]

Lewis, Desireé / Salo, Elaine (1993): Birth control, contraception and women’s rights in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 17, pp. 59-68.[4813]

Lewis, Desireé / Salo, Elaine (1998): Teenage contraceptive needs in urban South Africa, A case study, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 180-183.[4814]

Longmore, Laura (1959): The dispossessed, A study of the sex-life of Bantu women in urban areas in and around Johannesburg, Jonathan Cape Publishers, Cape Town.[4815]

MacLeod, Catriona (2002): Economic security and the social science literature on teen pregnancy in South Africa, in: Gender and Society, vol. 15, no. 5, pp. 647-664.[4816]

MacLeod, Catriona (2006): The management of risk, Adolescent sexual and reproductive health in South Africa, in: Critical Psychology, International Journal of Critical Psychology, Issue 17: Critical Psychology in Africa, pp. 77-96.[4817]

MacLeod, Catriona (2006): Early reproduction of gendered assumptions about adolescence, Scientific literature in South Africa, in: Childhood, Global Journal of Child Research, vol. 10, pp. 419-438.[4818]

MacLeod, Catriona/ Durrheim, Kevin (2002): Racializing teenage pregnancy, ‘Culture’ and ‘tradition’ in South African scientific literature, in: Ethnic and Racial Studies, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 778-801.[4819]

Mafanato, Constance S. (2004): Provision of abortion services by midwives in Limpopo Province of South Africa, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 75-78.[4820]

Maharaj, Pranitha (2000): Promoting male involvement in reproductive health, in: Agenda, no. 44, pp. 37-47.[4821]

Maharaj, Pranitha (2001): Male attitudes to family planning in the era of HIV/AIDS, Evidence from KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 245-258.[4822]

Masuku, Nokuthula (1998): Pregnant schoolgirls must ‘go’, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 37-38.[4823]

Mbananga, Nolwazi (2003): Towards a critical review of reproductive health information development in South Africa, in: Africanus, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 35-42.[4824]

Merali, Isafan (2000): Advancing women’s reproductive and sexual health rights, Using the international human rights system, in: Development in Practice, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 609-624.[4825]

Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi (2006): Partial truths: Representations of teenage pregnancy in research, in: Anthropology Southern Africa, vol. 29, no. 3/4, pp. 96-104.[4826]

Moultrie, Tom / Timaeus, Ian (2001): Fertility and living arrangements in South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 207-224.[4828]

Mqhayi, Mmabatho M. / Smit, Jennifer A. / McFadyen, Margaret L. et al. (2004): Missed opportunities, Emergency contraception utilisation by young South African women, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 137-144.[4827]

Muller, Carol Ann (1999): Rituals of fertility and the sacrifice of desire, Nazarite women’s performance in South Africa, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[4829]

Naidoo, Kammila (2002): Reproductive dynamics in the context of domestic violence and economic insecurity, Findings of a South African case study, in: Journal of Asian and African Studise, vol. 37, pp. 376-400.[4830]

Pick, William / Makhlouf-Obermeyer, C. (1996): Urbanisation, household composition and the reproductive health of women in a South African city, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 43, no. 10, pp. 1431-1441.[4831]

Pick, William / Ross, Mary / Dada, Yasmin (2002): The reproductive and occupational health of women street vendors in Johannesburg, South Africa, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 54, pp. 193-204.[4832]

Potts, Deborah (2001): Fertility in Southern Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 189-302.[4833]

Schäfer, Rita (2016): Kontroversen über Verhütungsmittel im Kontext von gender, sex und race in Südafrika, in: Niethammer, Lutz / Satjukow, Silke et al. (Hrsg.), Wenn die Chemie stimmt, Wallstein Verlag, Göttingen, pp.369-384.[11599]

Thomas, Duncan (1999): Fertility, education and resources in South Africa, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Casterline, John / Johnson-Kuhn, Jennifer / Haaga, John (eds.): Critical perspectives on schooling and fertility in the developing world, National Academy Press, Washington, pp. 138-180.[4834]

Vincent, Louise (2008): Cutting tradition, The political regulation of traditional circumcision rites in South Africa’s liberal democratic order, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 77-91.[4835]

health

Artz, L. / Smythe, D. / Combrinck, H. et al. (2006): Caught between policy and practice, Health and justice responses to gender based-violene, Crime, Violence and Injury Review, Medical Research Council, Cape Town.[5067]

Cunnan, Priscilla (1997): Family planning in an informal settlement, the case of Canaan in Durban, South Africa, in: Kalilpeni, Ezekiel / Thuiri, Philip (eds.): Issues and perspectives on health care in contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, pp. 165-177.[5068]

Human Rights Watch (1997): South Africa, Violence against women and the medico legal system, Human Rights Watch Publications, vol. 9, no. 4A, New York.[5069]

Moodley, Vadi (1997): The health status of women in a South African peri-urban settlement, The case of Amadawe, in: Kalilpeni, Ezekiel / Thuiri, Philip (eds.): Issues and perspectives on health care in contemporary Sub-Saharan Africa, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, pp. 179-193.[5070]

Morgen, Ruth (2003): ‘I’ve got two men and one woman’, Ancestors, sexuality and identity among same-sex identified women traditional healers in South Africa, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 375-391.[5071]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Abrahams, Yvette (1998): Images of Sarah Baartman, Sexuality, race, and gender in early-nineteenth-century Britain, in: Pierson, Ruth Roach / Chaudhuir, Nupur (eds.): Nation, empire, colony, Historicizing gender and racwe, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 220-236.[5479]

Bank, Leslie (2002): Beyond red and school: Gender, tradition and identity in the rural Eastern Cape, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 631-650.[5480]

Berger, Iris (1986): Sources of class consciousness: South African women in recent labour struggles, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Class and gender in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.216-236. (und in International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 49-66.)[5481]

Berger, Iris (1987): Solidarity fragmented: Garment workers of the Transvaal, 1930-1960, in: Marks, Shula / Trapido, Stanley (eds.): The politics of race, class and nationalism in 20th century South Africa, Longman Publishers, Burnt Mill, Harlow, pp. 124-155.[5482]

Berger, Iris (1989): Gender and working class history - South Africa in comparative perspective, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol.1, no. 2, pp. 205-222.[5483]

Berger, Iris (1990): Gender, race and political empowerment, South African canning workers, 1940-1960, in: Gender and Society, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 398-420.[5484]

Berger, Iris (1991): Never far from home, Family, community and working women, unpublished conference paper, no. 27, Conference on Women and Gender in South Africa, University of Natal, Durban.[5485]

Berger, Iris (1992): Categories and contexts, Reflections on the politics of identity in South Africa, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 18, pp. 284-294.[5486]

Berger, Iris (1992): Threads of Solidarity - Women in South African industry, 1900-1980, James Currey, Oxford.[5487]

Berger, Iris (1994): “Beasts of burden” revisited: Interpretations of women and gender in Southern African societies, in: Harms, Robert (ed.): Paths towards the past, African historical essays in honour of Jan Vansina, African Studies Association Press, Atlanta, pp. 123-142.[5488]

Berger, Iris (2001): An African “mother of the nation”, Madie Hall Xuma in South Africa, 1940-1963, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 547-566.[5489]

Berger, Iris (2006): From ethnography to social welfare, Ray Phillips and representations of urban women in South Africa, in: Le Fait missionnaire, no. 19, pp. 91-116.[5490]

Bernstein, Hilda (1976): The world that was ours, Heinemann Publications, London.[5491]

Bernstein, Hilda (1985): For their triumphs and for their tears - Women in Apartheid South Africa, International Defence and Aid Fund Publications, London.[5492]

Bonner, Philip (1988): Family, crime and political consciousness on the East Rand, 1939-1955, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 393-420.[5493]

Bonner, Philip (1990): Desireable or undesirable Sotho women? Liquor, prostitution and the migration of Sotho women to the Rand, 1920-1945, in: Walker, Cheryll (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 221-250.[5494]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1983): Marxism, feminism, and South African Studies, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 9, no.3, pp. 139-171.[5495]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1985): Migrant women and South African social change, Biographical approaches to social analysis, in: African Studies, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 87-96.[5496]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1991): Women of Phokeng - Consciousness, life strategy, and migrancy in South Africa, 1900-1983, Heinemann Publishers, New York.[5497]

Bradford, Helen (1987): ‘We are now the men’: Women’s beer protests in the Natal countryside, 1929, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict - South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 292-323.[5499]

Bradford, Helen (1991): Herbs, knives and plastic: 150 years of abortion in South Africa, in: Meade, Teresa / Walker, Mark (eds.): Science, medicine and cultural imperialism, MacMillian Publishers, Houndsmills, pp. 120-147.[5500]

Bradford, Helen (1992): ‘We women will show them’: Beer protests in the Natal countryside, 1929, in: Crush, Jonathan / Ambler, Charles (eds.): Liquor and labour in Southern Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, Ohio, pp. 208-234.[5501]

Bradford, Helen (1995): Olive Schreiner’s hidden agony, Facts, fiction and teenage abortion, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 623-641.[5502]

Bradford, Helen (1996): Women, gender and colonialism: Rethinking the history of the British Cape Colony and its frontier zones, c.1806-1870, in: Journal of African History, vol. 37, pp. 351-370.[5503]

Bradford, Helen (2000): Regendering Afrikanerdom, The 1899-1902 Anglo-Boer war, in: Blom, Ida / Hagemann, Karen / Hall, Catherine (eds.): Gendered nations, Nationalism an gender order in the long nineteenth century, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 207-225.[5504]

Bradford, Helen (2000): Peasants, historians and gender, A South African case study revisited, 1850-1886, in: History and Theory, vol. 39, pp. 86-110.[5505]

Bradford, Helen (2002): Gentlemen and Boers, Afrikaner nationalism, gender and colonial warfare in the South African War, in: Cuthbertson, Greg / Grundlingh, Albert / Suttie, Mary-Lynn (eds.): Writing a wider war, Rethinking gender, race, and identity in the South African War, 1899-1902, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 37-66.[5506]

Bradford, Helen / Qotole, Msokoli (2008): “Ingxoxo enkulu ngoNongqawuse”, A great debate about the Nonqawuse era, in: Kronos, vol. 34, pp. 66-105.[5507]

Bradlow, Edna (1993): Women and education in nineteenth century South Africa, The attitudes and experiences of middle-class English-speaking females at the Cape, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 28, pp. 119-150.[5498]

Bradlow, Edna (1987): Women at the Cape in the mid 19th century, in: South African Historical Journal, no. 19, pp. 51-76.[5508]

Bradlow, Edna (1988): Children and childhood at the Cape in the 19th century, in: Klio, vol. 20, pp. 8-27.[5509]

Bradlow, Edna (1991): The oldest charitable society in South Africa, One hundred years and more of the Ladies Benevolent Society, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 25, pp. 77-104.[5510]

Bradlow, Edna (1993): Women and education in nineteenth century South Africa, The attitudes and experiences of middle-class English-speaking females at the Cape, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 28, pp. 119-150.[5511]

Bradlow, Edna (1998): The social role of Jewish women in the Grunderzeit of the Cape Jewish Community, 1896-1930, in: Historia, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 67-85.[5512]

Breckenridge, Keith (1998): The allure of violence: Men, race and masculinity on the South African gold mines, 1900-1950, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 669-695.[5513]

Breckenridge, Keith (2000): Love letters and amanuenses, Beginning of cultural history of the working class private sphere in Southern Africa, 1900-1933, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 337-348.[5514]

Brink, Elsabé (1987): ‘Maar ‘n klomp ‘factory’ meide: Afrikaner family and community on the Witwatersrand during the 1920s, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict - South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 177-201.[5515]

Brink, Elsabé (1989): Purposeful plays, prose and poems: The writings of the garment workers, 1929-1945, in: Clayton, Cherry (ed.): Women and writing in South Africa, Heinemann Publishers, Marshalltown, pp. 107-128.[5516]

Brink, Elsabé (1990): Man-made women, Gender, class and the ideology of the volksmoeder, in: Walker, Cherryl (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 273-292.[5517]

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Mtuze, P.T. (1991): Female stereotyping in Xhosa prose fiction and folk tales, in: South African Journal of African Languages, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 66-73.[6234]

Muhlenbach, Andrea (1998): Self, other and social context, Dialogue relationships in Nadine Gordimer’s an image of success, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 37, no. 1-2, pp. 102-117.[6235]

Muhlenbach, Andrea (1997): Between the fires, Gender and post-apartheid reasoning in two South African novels, in: World Literature Written in English, 36, no. 1, pp. 156-168.[6236]

Murray, Jessica (2013): Stereotypes and Subversions, Reading Queer representations in two contemporary South African novels, in: English in Africa vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 119-138.[11730]

Murray, Sally Ann (2018): Queerying examples of contemporary South African short fiction, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 77-95. [11729]

Murray, Sally-Ann (1992): Olive Schreiner, ‘A soul struggling with its material surroundings, in: Chapman, Michael / Gardner, Colin / Mphahlele, Es’kia (eds.): Perspectives on South African English Literature, Ad. Donker Publishers, Johannesburg, pp. 19-36.[6237]

Müller, Margaret (1998): Forms of resistance, South African women’s writing during Apartheid, in. Hecate, 14, pp. 118-145.[6238]

Ncobo, Lauretta (1985): The African woman writer, in: Kunapipi, vol. 7, no. 2-3, pp. 81-82.[6239]

Ncobo, Lauretta (1991): A black South African woman writing long after Schreiner, in: Vivian, Italia (ed.): The flawed diamond, Essays on Olive Schreiner, Dangaroo Press, pp. 189-199.[6240]

Ncobo, Lauretta (1988): My life and my writing, in: Ngcobo, Lauretta (ed.): Let it be told, Essays by black women writers in Britain, Virago, London, pp. 133-143. (and in: Kunapipi, vol. 7, no. 2-3, pp. 83-86.)[6241]

Ncobo, Lauretta (1992): Bessie Head, A thematic approach, in: Chapman, Michael et al. (eds.): Perspectives on South African Literature, Ad Donker Publishers, Johannesburg, pp. 342-351.[6242]

Neil, Michael (1990): Translating the present, Language, knowledge and identity in Nadine Gordimer’s ‘July’s people’ in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 71-97.[6243]

Newell, Stephanie (1995): Conflict and transforation in Bessie Head’s A question of power, Serowe, Village of the rain wind and A bewitched crossroad, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. XXX, no. 2, pp. 63-83.[6247]

Newman, Judie (1990): Nadine Gordimer and the naked Southern ape, ‘Something out there’, in: Journal of the short story in English, vol. 15, pp. 55-73.[6244]

Newman, Judie (2001): Jump starts, Nadine Gordimer after Apartheid, in: Yousaf, Nahem (ed.): Apartheid narratives, Rodopi Publishers, Amsterdam.[6245]

Newman, Judie (1988): Nadine Gordimer, Routledge, New York.[6246]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[6248]

Ngwenya, Thengani (2004): Hegemony and autobiographical self-representation, The case of Sindiwe Magona, in: Alternation, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 131-150.[6249]

Nixon, Rob (1996): Rural transnationalism, Bessie Head’s southern spaces, in: Darian-Smith, K. / Gunner, L. / Nuttal, S. (eds.): Text, theory, space: Land, literature and history in South Africa and Australia, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 243-254.[6250]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.) (1997): The politics of (m)othering: Womanhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge, London.[6251]

Nuttall, Sarah (1994): Reading in the lives and writing og Black South African women, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, no. 1, pp. 15-27.[6252]

Nuttall, Sarah (1996): Reading and recognition in three South African women’s autobiographies, in: Current Writing, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 1-18.[6253]

Nuttall, Sarah (1996): Flatness and fantasy, Representations of the land in two recent South African novels (Elleke Boemer), in. Darian-Smith, Kate ( Gunner, Liz / Nuttall, Sarah (eds.): Text, theory and space, Land, literature and history in South Africa and Australia. Routledge, London, pp. 219-230.[6254]

Nuttall, Sarah (1997): Popular stories of Apartheid, Gillian Slovo’s South African novels, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. xxxii, no. 1, pp. 79-92.[6255]

Ogede, Ode et al. (2000): An early image of Apatheid and post-Apartheid society, Olive Schreiner’s ‘The story of an African Farm’, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 13, pp. 251-256.[6258]

Ogunbesan, Kolawole (1979): The Cape gooseberry also grows in Botswana, Alienation and commitment in the writings of Bessie Head, in: Presence Africaine, 109, pp. 92-106.[6262]

Ogwude, Sophie (1998): Protest and commitment in Bessie Head’s Utopia, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 70-81.[6259]

Ogwude, Sophie (2002): Personality and self re-creation in Bessie Head’s art, in African Literature Today, vol. 23, pp. 110-122.[6260]

Ogwude, Sophie (2000): An exile writing on home, Protest and commitment in the works of Bessie Head, in: African Literature Today, vol. 22, pp. 64-76.[6261]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (2004): African women writers and feminism, An example of Miriam Tlali, in: Ojo-Ade, Femi (ed.): Being black, being human, More essays on black culture, Africa World Press, Trenton.[6257]

Ola, Virginia Uzoma (1986): Women’s roles in Bessie Head ‘Ideal world’, in: Ariel, vol. 17, pp. 39-47.[6263]

Ola, Virginia Uzoma (1994): The life and works of Bessie Head, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston.[6264]

Olaogun, Modupe (1994): Irony and schizophrenia in Bessie Head’s ‘Maru’, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 25, pp. 69-87.[6265]

Olaogun, Modupe (2002): Slavery and etiological discourse in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Buchi Emecheta, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.171-193.[6266]

Olaussen, Maria (1997): Forceful celebration in harsh terrain, Place and identity in three novels by Bessie Head, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[6267]

Olaussen, Maria (2001): ‘Imagined families' in South African women's autobiographies, in: Eriksson Baaz, Maria E. / Palmberg, Mai (eds.): Same and Other: Negotiating African Identity in Cultural Production, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[6268]

Oliphant, Andries (ed.) (1998): A writing life, Celebrating Nadine Gordimer, Viking Publishers, London.[6269]

Opland, Jeff (ed.) (2007): The nation’s bounty, The Xhosa poetry of Nontsizi Mgqweto, Wits University Press, Johannesburg.[6270]

O’Brien, Colleen (1994): The search for Mother Africa, Poetry revises women’s struggle for freedom, in: African Studies Review, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 147-155.[6256]

Parker, Kenneth (2001): Gendering the language, liberating a people: Women writing in Afrikaans and the ‘new’ South Africa, in. Kriger, Robert / Zegeye, Abebe (eds.): Culture in the new South Africa, After apartheid, vol. 2, Kwela Books, Cape Town, pp. 183-205.[6271]

Peck, Richard (1989): One foot before the other into an unknown future, The dialectic in Nadine Gordimer’s Burger’s daughter, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 26-43.[6272]

Perkins, Kathy (ed.) (1998): Black South African women, An anthology of plays, Routledge Publishers, London.[6273]

Petersen, Kirsten Holst / Rutherford, Anne (eds.) (1986): A double colonization, colonial and post-colonial women’s writing, Oxford.[6274]

Peterson, Kirsten Holt (1991): The search for a role for white women in a liberated South Africa, A thematic approach to the novels of Nadine Gordimer, in: Kunapipi, vol. 13, no. 1-2, pp. 170-177.[6275]

Pettersson, Rose (1995): Nadine Gordimer’s one story of a state apart, Uppsala University press, Uppsala.[6276]

Pridmore, J. (1997): The Wives of Henry Fynn: `Unwritten But Potentially Transfiguring Texts? The Untold Biographies of Vundhlazi of the Zelemu and Christina Brown, in: Alternation, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 73-83.[6277]

Quanyum, Mohamed A. (1996): July’s people, Gordimer’s radical critique of white ‘liberal’ attitude, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 13-24.[6278]

Ravell-Pint, Thelma (1995): Women’s writing and the politics of South Africa, The ambiguous role of Nadine Gordimer, in: Davies, Carole Boyce (ed.): Black women’s diaspora, Moving beyond boundaries, Bd. 2, Pluto Press, London, pp. 125-136.[6279]

Ravenscroft, Arthur (1976): The novels of Bessie Head, in: Heywood, Christopher (ed.): Aspects of South African Literature, Heineman, London, pp. 174-186.[6280]

Reddy, Vasu (2003): Performative identities: Race, sexuality and gender in Colleen Craig’s Crossing the line (1989) and Apart (1995), in: Current Writing, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 138-155.[6281]

Richards, Constance (2005): Nationalism and development of identity in postcolonial fiction, Zoe Wicomb and Michelle Cliff, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 20-33.[6282]

Robinson, Jennifer (2005): White women researching / representing ‘others’, From anti-apartheid to postcolonialism? in: Blunt, Alison / Rose, Gillian (eds.): Writing women, writing space, The Guildford Press, New York, pp. 197-225.[6283]

Ruden, Sarah (1999): Country of my skull, Guilt and sorrow and the limits of forgiveness in the new South Africa, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 165-179.[6284]

Ryan, Pamela (1998): Singing in prison, Women writers and the discourse of resistance, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): Sisterhood, feminism, and power, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 198-212.[6285]

Sample, Maxine (1991): Landscape and spatial metaphors in Bessie Head’s The collector of treasures, in: Studies in Short Fiction, 28, 3, pp. 311-319.[6286]

Sample, Maxine (2003): Critical essays on Bessie Head, Greenwood Publishing Group, New York.[6287]

Samuelson, Meg (2000): Reading the maternal voice in Sindiwa Magona’s To my children’s children and Mother to Mother, Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 227-245.[6288]

Samuelson, Meg (2002): The rainbow womb, Rape and race in South African fiction of transition, in: Kunapipu, Journal of Post-Colonial Writing, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 88-100.[6289]

Samuelson, Meg (2005): Home and the world, The contestation of social fictions in three South African women's memoirs, in: English Academy Review, vol. 22, pp. 32-42.[6290]

Samuelson, Meg (2007): The disfigured body of female guerilla, (De)militarization, sexual violence and redomestication in Zoe Wicomb’s David’s story, in: Signs, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 843-844.[6291]

Samuelson, Meg (2010): Oceanic histories and protean poetics, The surge of the sea in Zoe Wicomb’s ficton, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 543-558.[6292]

Schalwyk, D. (2001): Chronotypes of self in the writings of women political prisoners in South Africa, in: Yousaf, Nahem (ed.): Apartheid narratives, Rodopi, Studies in Literature, 31. Amsterdam.[6293]

Schipper, Mineke (1985): Interview with Miriam Tlali, in: Schipper, Mineke (ed.): Unheard words, Women and literature in Africa, the Arab world, Asia, the Carribean and Latin America, Alison and Busby, London, pp. 59-69.[6294]

Segall, Kimberly Wedeven (2005): Pursuing ghosts, The traumatic sublime in J.M. Coetzee`s Disgrace, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 40-54.[6295]

Sicherman, Carol (1993): Zoe Wicomb’s You can’t get lost in Cape Town, The narrator’s identity, in: Fletcher, Pauline (ed.): Black/white writing, Essays on South African literature, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp. 111-122.[6296]

Silva, Neluka (2004): The Gendered nation: Contemporary writings in South Africa, Sage Publishers, London.[6297]

Slovo, Gillian (1997): Every Secret Thing: My Family, My Country, Little and Brown Publishers, Boston/London.[6298]

Smith, Lauren (1999): Christ as Creole, Hybridity and the revision of colonial imagery in the works of Bessie Head, in: Eglish in Africa, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 61-80.[6299]

Smith, Rowland (1988): Leisure, law and loathing, Matrons, mistresses, mothers in the fiction of Nadine Gordimer and Jillian Becker, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 28. no. 1, pp. 41-51.[6300]

Smith, Rowland (eds.) (1990): Critical essays on Nadine Gordimer, G.K. Hall Publishers, Boston.[6301]

Solberg, Rolf / Hacksley, Malcolm (eds.) (1996): Reflections, Perspectives on writing in post-apartheid South Africa, National English Literacy Musuem, Grahamstown.[6302]

Stander, Christell (1992): Winding through nationalism, patriarchy, privilege and concern, A selected overview of Afrikaans women writing, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 5-24.[6303]

Stanley, Liz (2000): Encountering the imperial and colonial past through Olive Schreiner's `Trooper Peter Halket of Mashonaland", in: Women's Writing, vol. 7, no.2, pp. 197-219.[6304]

Strater, R. (2000): Using life histories to explore change: Women's urban struggles in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 38-46.[6305]

Stute, Barbara (1988): Zoe Wicomb “You can’t get lost in Cape Town”, in: Matatu, vol. 3-4, pp. 296-300.[6306]

Taylor, Viviene (1993): Tradition and women writers in Southern Africa, Or how to enjoy the river without carrying the water drum, in: Fletcher, Pauline (ed.): Black/white writing, Essays on South African literature, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, pp. 99-110.[6307]

Taylor, Viviene (1997): Economic gender injustice: The macro picture, in: Agenda, no. 33, pp. 9-15.[6308]

Taylor, Viviene (1997): Black women writers, English fiction in a new South Africa, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (Hrsg.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 107-117.[6309]

Temple-Thurston, Barbara (1988): Madam and boy: A relationship of shame in Gordimer’s July People, in: World Literature Written in English, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 51-58.[6310]

Temple-Thurston, Barbara (1999): Nadine Gordimer Revisited, Twayne Publishing, New York.[6311]

Thale, T. (2000): Community and narration in Emma Mashinini’s ‘Strikes have followed me all my life’ in: Alternation, vol. 7, pp. 163-177.[6312]

Tlali, Miriam (1988): The dominant tone of black South African writing, in: Holst Petersen, Kirsten (ed.): Criticism and ideology, Seminar Proceedings no. 20, Scandinavian Institute of African Studies, Uppsala, pp. 199-204.[6313]

Tlali, Miriam (1998): Interview by Rosemary Jolly, in: Attridge, Derek / Jolly, Rosemary (eds.): Writing South Africa, Literature, apartheid, and democracy, 1970-1995, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 141-148.[6314]

Townsend, Rosemary (2001): Women as ‘collectors or treasures’, Bessie Head’s reconstruction of female identiy, in: Kaschula, Russell (ed.): African oral literature, Functions in contemporary contexts, New Africa Book, London, pp. 39-44.[6315]

Trump, Martin (1989): What time is this for a woman? An analysis of Nadine Gocdimer’s short fiction, in: Clayton, Cherry (ed.): Women and writing in South Africa, Heinemann Publishers, Marshalltown, pp. 183-208.[6316]

Uledi-Kamanga, Brighton (2002): Cracks in the wall, Nadine Gordimer’s fiction and the irony of Apartheid, Africa World Press, Trenton.[6317]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2000): The work of the nation, Heroic masculinity in South African autobiographical writing of the Anti-Apartheid struggle, in: Journal of Development Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 157-178.[6318]

Van der Merve, P.P. (1990): A poet’s commitment: Antjie Krog’s Lady Anne, in: Current Writing, Text and Reception in Southern Africa, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 131-146.[6319]

Van der Vlies, Andrew (2010): The archieve, the spectral, and narrative responsibility in Zoe Wicomb’s Playing in the light, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 583-598.[6320]

Van Niekerk, Annemarie (1994): Liberating herstory from history, in: Smith, A. et al. (ed.): Rethinking South African literary history, Durban, pp. 136-151.[6321]

Van Niekerk, Annemarie (ed.) (1990): Raising the blind, A century of South African women’s writing, Donker Press, Parklands.[6322]

Van Niekerk, Marlene (1996): Afrikaner women and her ‘prison’, Afrikaner nationalism and literature, in: Matatu, 15, pp. 141-154.[6323]

Van Wyk Smith, Malvern (1999): Napoleon and the giant, Discursive conflicts in Olive Schreiner’s ‘story of an African farm’, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 151-163.[6324]

Van Wyk Smith, Malvern / MacLennan, Don (eds.) (1983): Olive Schreiner and after, Essays on South African Literature, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town.[6325]

Vaubel, Natasha (1997): The battlefield of politics and selfhood in Bessie Head’s A question of power, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 83-106.[6326]

Veit-Wild, Flora / Naguschewski, Dirk (eds.) (2005): Body, sexuality and gender, Versions and sub-versions in African Literature, 1, Rodopi, Amsterdam.[6327]

Vigne, Randolph (ed.) (1991): A gesture of belonging – Letters by Bessie head, Heinemann Publishers, London.[6328]

Viljoen, Louise (1996): Postcolonialism and recent women’s writing in Afrikaans, in: World Literture Today, vol. 70, no. 1, pp. 62-72.[6329]

Vivian, Italia (ed.) (1991): The flawed diamond, Essays on Olive Schreiner, Dangaroo Press, Sydney.[6330]

Wagner, Kathrin (1994): Reading Nadine Gordimer, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[6331]

Waterman, David (1997): Olive Schreiner’s The story of an African farm, Power, gender and age, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 43-61.[6332]

Weiss, Bettina (ed.) (2004): Tangible voice-hrowing, Empowering corporeal discourse in African women’s writing, of Southern Africa, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[6333]

Weiss, Bettina (ed.) (2004): The end of unheard narratives, Contemporary perspectives on Southern African literatures, Bettina Weiss Publishers, Heidelberg.[6334]

Wicomb, Zoe (1990): To hear the variety of discourses, in: Current Writing, Text and Reception in Southern Africa, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 35-44. (und in: Daymond, M.J. (ed.): South African feminisms, Writing, theory and criticism, 1990-1994, Garland Publishing, New York, 1996, pp. 45-56.[6335]

Wicomb, Zoe (1991): Another story, in: Lefanu, S. / Hayward, S. (eds.): Colours of a new day, Writing for South Africa, Pantheon, New York, pp. 1-15.[6336]

Wicomb, Zoe (1995): Reading, writing, and visual production in the New South Africa, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. XXX, no. 2, pp. 1-15.[6337]

Wicomb, Zoe (1998): Shame and identity, The case of the coloured in South Africa, in: Attridge, Derek / Jolly, Rosemary (eds.): Writing South Africa, Literature, apartheid, and democracy, 1970-1995, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 91-107.[6338]

Wicomb, Zoe (2001): South Afican short fiction and orality, in: Bardolph, J. (ed.): Telling stories, Postcolonial short fiction in English, Rodopi, Amsterdam, pp. 157-170.[6339]

Wicomb, Zoe (2001): Five Afrikaner texts and the rehabilitation of whiteness, in: Kriger, Robert / Zegeye, Abebe (eds.): Culture in the new South Africa, After apartheid, vol. 2, Kwela Books, Cape Town, pp. 159-181.[6340]

Wilhelm, Cherry (1983): Bessie Head, The face of Africa, in: English in Africa, 10, 1, pp. 1-13.[6341]

Wisker, Gina (2000): ‘No world as yet fro what she has done’, Re-memory and revisioning in Bessie Head and South African women’s autobiographical writings, in: Alternation, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 5-28.[6342]

Wisker, Gina (2002): Redefining an African sky, South African women’s writing post apartheid, in: KUNAPIPI, Journal of Post Colonial Studies, vol. 24, no. 1 & 2, pp. 140-154.[6343]

Worsfold, Brian (1994): Black South African country women in Lauretta Ngcobo’ long prose works, in: Boehmer, Elleke / Chrisman, Laura / Parker, Kenneth (eds.): Altered states, Writing and South Africa, Dangoroo Press, Sydney, pp. 111-119.[6344]

Wyk, Smith van, Malvern / MacLennan, Don (eds.) (1983): Olive Schreiner and after, Essays on Southern African Literature, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town.[6345]

Xaba, Makhosazana / Martin, Karen (eds.) (2017): Queer Africa 2, New Stories, Ma Thoko´s, Braamfontein / Johannesburg.[11747]

media

Gehrmann, Susanne (2018): Remidiating romance, Forms and functions of new media in contemporary love stories fom Togo and South Africa, in: Africa Today, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 64-84.[6564]

Lediga, Karabo / Overland, Lene (eds.) (2004): Youth fighting gender violence in and through the media, Media Watch Publications, Cape Town.[6565]

Lowe Morna, Coleen (2004): The ‘I’ stories, Speaking out on gender violence in Southern Africa, Gender Links, Johannesburg.[6566]

Lowe Morna, Coleen (2007): Making every voice count, A Southern African case study, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 369-385.[6567]

Lowe Morna, Coleen / Overland, Lene (2002): Getting smart, Strategic communication for gender activists in South Africa, Gender Links / Women’s Media Watch, Johannesburg / Cape Town.[6568]

Nakana, Steven / Overland, Lene (2001): ‘Under one roof’, Gender, Media and democracy, Gender training manual for media activists, Women`s Media Watch, Cape Town.[6569]

Naughton, Tracey (1996): Community radio: A voice for the voiceless, in: Agenda, no. 31, pp. 12-18.[6570]

Overland, Lene (2004): Monitoring HIV/AIDS reporting through the gender lens, Media Watch Publications, Cape Town.[6571]

Sehoole, Trevor Chika / Moja, Teboho (2003): Pedagogical issues and gender in cyberspace education, Distance education in South Africa, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 475-496.[6572]

Talmor, Ruti (2013): From the margins you push so that the centre implodes, Queer media in South Africa, in: GLQ, a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 383-403. [11756]

politics - wars violent conflicts

Annecke, Wendy (1990): Women and the war in Natal, in: Agenda, no. 7, pp. 12-37. Bridger, Emily[6876]

Annecke, Wendy (2021): Young women against Apartheid, Gender, youth and South Africa’s liberation struggle, James Currey, Oxford.[6877]

Budlender, Debbie / Meintjes, Sheila / Schreiner, Jenny (1983): Women and resistance in South Africa, A review article, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 10, pp. 131-135.[6878]

Cock, Jacklyn (2005): ‘Guards and guns’, Towards privatised militarism in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 791-803.[6879]

Curnow, Robyn (2000): Thandi Modise, A woman at war, in: Agenda, no. 43, pp. 36-40.[6880]

Gaitskell, Deborah / Unterhalter, Elaine (1989): Mothers of the nation: A comparative analysis of nation, race and motherhood in Afrikaner nationalism and the African National Congress, in: Yuval-Davis, Nira / Anthias, Floya (eds.): Women - Nation - State, London, pp. 58-76.[6881]

Goldblatt, Beth / Meintjes, Sheila (1998): South African women demand the truth, in: Turshen, Meredeth / Twagiramariya, Clothilde (eds.): What women do in wartimes, Zed Books, London, pp. 27-61.[6882]

Goldblatt, Beth / Meintjes, Sheila (1989): A community is a liberated as its women, A critical look at women in South African poetry, Institute for a Democratic Alternative in South Africa, IDASA, Occasional Papers, 18, Cape Town. [6883]

Hassim, Shireen / Stiebel, Lindy (1993): The semiotics of the struggle, Gender representations in the Natal violence, PRIF Reports, no. 30, Veröffentlichungen der Hessische Stiftung für Friedens- und Konfliktforschung, Frankfurt a.M.[6884]

Israel, Mark / Lyons, Tanya / Mason, C. (2002): Women, resistance and Africa: Armed struggles in Zimbabwe, South Africa and Eritrea, in: Humanity and Society, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 196-213.[6885]

Krog, Antje (2001): Locked into loss and silence, Testimonies of gender and violence at the South African Truth Commission, in: Moser, Caroline / Clark, Fiona (eds.): Victims, perpetrators or actors? Gender, armed conflict and political violence, Zed Books, London, pp. 203-216.[6886]

Maitse, Teboho (1996): The past is the present, in: Bell, Diane / Klein, Renate (ed.): Radically speaking - Feminism reclaimed, Zed Books, London, pp. 436-440.[6887]

Maitse, Teboho (2000): Revealing silence, Voices from South Africa, in: Jacobs, Susie / Jacobson, Ruth / Marchbank, Jen (eds.): States in conflict, Gender violence and resistance, Zed Books, London, pp. 199-214.[6888]

Manicom, Linzi (1992): Ruling relations: Rethinking state and gender in Southern African history, in: Journal of African History, vol. 33, pp. 441-465.[6889]

Oboe, Annlisa (2007): The TRC women’s hearing as performance and protest in the new South Africa, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 60-76.[6890]

Ross, Fiona (2001): Speech and silence, Women’s testimony in the first five weeks of public hearings of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, in: Das, Veena / Kleinman, Arthur / Lock, Margaret / Ramphele, Mamphela / Reynolds, Pamela (eds.): Remaking a world, Violence, social suffering, and recovery, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 250-279.[6891]

Ross, Fiona (2003): Bearing witness, Women and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Pluto Press, London.[6892]

Russell, Diana (1988): Detention in South Africa, A woman’s experience, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 3-24.[6893]

Russell, Diana (1989): Life in a police state: Black South African women speak out, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 157-166.[6894]

Russell, Diana (1989): Lives of courage - Women for a new South Africa, New York.[6895]

Schäfer, Rita (2008): Frauen und Kriege in Afrika, ein Beitrag zur Gender-Forschung, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[11887]

Walker, Cherryl (1982): Women and resistance in South Africa, Johannesburg.[6898]

Wells, Julia (1983): Why women rebel: A comparative study of South African women’s resistance movements in Bloemfontein (1913) and Johannesburg (1958), in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 55-70.[6896]

Wells, Julia (1993): We now demand! The history of women’s resistance to pass laws in South Africa, Johannesburg.[6897]

politics

Adams, Ubanesia (2003): Gender equality promotion in the Provincial Administration of the Western Cape, Insights from the Western Cape Office on the Status for Women and Gender Focal Units, in: Politeia, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 25-38.[7403]

Albertyn, Catherine / Hassim, Shireen (2003): The boundaries of democracy, Gender, HIV and culture, in: Everatt, D. / Maphai, V. (ed.): The real state of the nation, South Africa after 1990, Johannesburg, pp. 137-164.[7404]

Beall, Jo / Hassim, Shireen / Todes, Alison (1989): ‘A bit on the side’? Gender struggles in the politics of transformation in South Africa, in: Feminist Review, vol. 33, pp. 30-56.[7405]

Britton, Hannah (2001): New struggles, new strategies, Emerging patterns of women’s political participation in the South African parliament, in: International Politics, no. 38, pp.173-200.[7406]

Britton, Hannah (2002): Coalition building, election rules, and party politics, South African women’s path to parliament, in: Africa Today, vol. 49, pp.33-67.[7407]

Britton, Hannah (2005): Women in the South African parliament, From resistance to governance, University of Illinois Press, Urbana / Illinois.[7408]

Britton, Hannah (2001): New struggles, new strategies, Emerging patterns of women’s political participation in the South African parliament, in: International Politics, no. 38, pp. 173-200.[7414]

Britton, Hannah (2002): Coalition building, election rules, and party politics, South African women’s path to parliament, in: Africa Today, vol. 49, pp. 33-67.[7415]

Britton, Hannah (2005): Women in the South African parliament, From resistance to governance, University of Illinois Press, Urbana / Illinois.[7416]

Britton, Hannah / Fish, Jennifer / Meintjes, Sheila (eds.) (2009): Women’s activism in South Africa, Working across divides, University of Kwa Zulu Natal Press, Scottsville.[7417]

Budlender, Debbie (1997): The women’s budget, in: Agenda, no. 33, pp.37-42.[7409]

Budlender, Debbie (1997): Women, gender and policy-making in the South African context, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 513-530.[7410]

Budlender, Debbie (1998): Race and gender in local government employment, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 679-688.[7411]

Budlender, Debbie (2000): The political economy of women’s budgets in the South, in: World Development, vol. 28, no. 7, pp. 1365-1378.[7412]

Bulman, Fiona / Ntombla-Nzimande, Phumelele (1998): Women and the political violence in KZN Midlands, An outsiders inside view - an Insiders outside view, (1984-1994), unpublished conference paper, Presented at the Conference on political violence in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands, 1984-1994, University of Natal, 28-30 January, 1998, Pietermaritzburg.[7413]

Byamyima, Winnie / Morna, Colleen Lowe et al. (2007): At the coalface, Gender and local government in Southern Africa, Gender Links, Johannesburg.[7418]

Charman, Andrew / de Swardt, Cobus / Simons, Mary (1991): The politics of gender, Negotiating liberation, in: Transformation, vol. 15, pp. 40-64.[7419]

Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) (1999): Women’s voters march to the polls, Publications of the Commission on Gender Equality, Johannesburg.[7424]

Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) (1998): The National Conference on witchcraft violence, 6.-10.9.1998, Publications of the Commission on Gender Equality, Johannesburg.[7420]

Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) (1998): Information and Evaluation Workshop, Western Cape Province, March 1998, Publications of the Commission on Gender Equality, Johannesburg.[7421]

Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) (1999): Review of the 1999 elections, A gender perspective, Publications of the Commission on Gender Equality, Johannesburg.[7422]

Commission on Gender Equality (CGE) (1999): Redefining politics, South African women and democracy, Publications of the Commission on Gender Equality, Johannesburg.[7423]

Connell, Dan (1998): Strategies for change, women and politics in Eritrea and South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 25, no. 76, pp. 189-206. (und in: Fox, Diana / Hasci, Naima (eds.): The challenges of women’s activism and human rights in Africa, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, pp. 214-248.)[7425]

Dobrowolsky, Alexandra Z. / Hart. Vivien (eds.) (2003): Women making constitutions, New politics and comparative perspectives, Palgrave Macmillan, New York/Basingstoke/Hampshire.[7426]

Fick, Glenda / Meintjes, Sheila / Simons, Mary (eds.) (2002): One woman, one vote, The gender politics of South African elections, Publications of the Electoral Institute of Southern Africa, Johannesburg.[7427]

Fish, Jennifer (2006): Engendering democracy, Domestic labour and coalition building in South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 107-128.[7428]

GAP - Gender Advocacy Programme (2000): Gender politics at local level, in: Agenda, no. 45, pp. 13-17.[7429]

Geisler, Gisela (2000): Parliament is another terrain of struggle, Women, men and politics in South Africa, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 605-630.[7430]

Geisler, Gisela (2004): Women and the remaking of politics in Southern Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[7431]

Goetz, Anne Marie (1998): Women in politics and gender equity on policy, South Africa and Uganda, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 25, no. 76, pp. 241-262.[7432]

Goetz, Anne Marie / Hassim, Shireen (eds.) (2003): No shortcuts to power, African women in politics and policy making, Zed Books, London.[7433]

Gouws, Amanda (1994): Women, civil society and citizenship, A reaction to Schreiner, in: Rhoodi, N. / Liebenberg, I. (eds.): Democratic nation building in South Africa, Publications of the Human Science Research Council, Pretoria, pp. 315-324.[7434]

Gouws, Amanda (1999): Beyond the equality and difference, The politics of women’s citizenship, in: Agenda, no. 40, pp. 54-65.[7435]

Gouws, Amanda (1999): The gender dimension of the 1999 election, in: Reynolds, Andrew (ed.): Elections ’99, South Africa – From Mandela to Mbeki, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 159-172.[7436]

Gouws, Amanda (2003): Contesting democracy, HIV/AIDS and the achievements of gender equality in South Africa, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 29, pp. 955-975.[7437]

Gouws, Amanda (2005): (Un)thinking citizenship, Feminst debates in contemporary South Africa, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot.[7438]

Gouws, Amanda (2008): Obstacles for women in leadership positions, in: Signs, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 21-26.[7439]

Gouws, Amanda (2008): Changing women’s exclusion from politics, Examples from Southern Africa, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, pp. 537-563.[7440]

Gwagwa, Nolulamo (1991): The family in South Africa’s politics: Conceptualizing progressive change, in: Bazilli, Susan (ed.): Putting women on the agenda, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 124-133.[7441]

Gwagwa, Nolulamo (1991): Women in local government, Towards a future in South Africa, in. Environment and Urbanization, vol. 1, pp. 70-78.[7442]

Hassim, Shireen (1988): Reinforcing conservatism, An analysis of the politics of the Inkatha Women’s Brigade, in: Agenda, no. 2, pp. 3-17.[7443]

Hassim, Shireen (1990): Conservative politics and the construction of gender, paper presented at the ASSA Conference, Juli 1990, University of Stellenbosch, unpublished paper, Stellenbosch.[7444]

Hassim, Shireen (1990): Equality versus authority: Inkatha and the politics of gender in Natal, in: Politicon, vol. 17, no. 2. pp. 99-114.[7445]

Hassim, Shireen (1991): Gender, social location and feminist politics in South Africa, in: Transformations, no. 15, pp. 65-82.[7446]

Hassim, Shireen (1992): The gender agenda, Transforming the ANC, in: Southern Africa Report, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 13-17.[7447]

Hassim, Shireen (1993): Family, motherhood and Zulu nationalism: The politics of the Inkatha Women’s Brigade, in: Feminist Review, no. 43, pp. 1-26.[7448]

Hassim, Shireen (1998): Gender institutions in South Africa, New forms of politics, in: L’Afrique Politique, Femmes d’Afrique, pp. 77-86.[7449]

Hassim, Shireen (1999): From presence to power, Women’s citizenship in a new democracy, in: Agenda, no. 40, pp. 6-7.[7450]

Hassim, Shireen (1999): The dual politics of representation: Women and electoral politics in South Africa, in: Politicon, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 201-212.[7451]

Hassim, Shireen (2000): Institutionalising gender: An examination of state-led strategies for gender equality, in: Taylor, Viviene / Mager, Ann / Cardoso, Paula (eds.): Critical African perspectives on women and governance, SADEP Publications, Cape Town, pp. 35-38.[7452]

Hassim, Shireen (2002): `A conspiracy of women', The women's movement in South Africa's transition to democracy, in Social Research, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 693-732.[7453]

Hassim, Shireen (2003): The limits of popular democracy, Women’s organisations, feminism and the UDF, in: Transformation, vol. 51, pp. 48-73.[7454]

Hassim, Shireen (2003): Representation, participation and democratic effectiveness, Feminist challenges to representative democracy in South Africa, in: Goetz, Anne Marie / Hassim, Shireen (eds.): No shortcuts to power, African women in politics and policy making, Zed Books, London, pp. 81-109.[7455]

Hassim, Shireen (2018): Decolonising equality, The radical roots of the gender equality clause in the South African constitution, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 342–358. [11807]

Hassim, Shireen (2003): The gender pact and democratic consolidation, Institutionalizing gender equality in the South African State, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 504-528.[7456]

Hassim, Shireen (2014): The ANC Women´s League, Sex, gender and politics, Jacana Media, Auckland Park, Cape Town.[11808]

Hassim, Shireen (2004): Nationalism, feminism and autonomy, The ANC in exile and the question of women, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 433-456.[7457]

Hassim, Shireen (2019): Fatima Meer, selected writings, edited with an introductory essay by Shireen Hassim, Voices of Liberation, HSRC, Pretoria. [11809]

Hassim, Shireen (2004): Nationalism displaced, Citizenship discourses in the transition, in: Gouws, Amanda (ed.): (Un)Thinking citizenship, Feminist debates in contemporary South Africa, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot.[7458]

Hassim, Shireen (2005): Turning gender rights into entitlements, Women and welfare provision in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Social Research, vol. 72, no. 3, pp. 621-646.[7459]

Hassim, Shireen (2005): Terms of engagement, South African challenges, in: Feminist Africa, issue 4, pp. 10-27.[7460]

Hassim, Shireen (2005): Voices, hierarchies and spaces, Reconfiguring the women’s movement in democratic South Africa, in: Politikon, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 175-194.[7461]

Hassim, Shireen (2005): Women's organizations and democracy in South Africa, Contesting authority, Women in Africa and the Diaspora, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, Wisconsin.[7462]

Hassim, Shireen (2006): Women’s organisations and democracy in South Africa, Contesting authority, KwaZulu Natal Press, Durban.[7463]

Hassim, Shireen / Gouws, Amanda (1998): Redefining the public space: Women’s organizations, gender consciousness and civil society in South Africa, in: Politicon, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 53-76.[7464]

Hassim, Shireen / Metelerkamp, Jo / Todes, Alison (1987): “A bit on the side”? Gender struggles and political transformation in South Africa, in: Transformation, vol. 5, pp. 3-32.[7465]

Heinrich-Boell-Foundation (2001): Gender gaps in our constitutions, Women’s concern in selected African countries, Heinrich Boell Foundation, Nairobi.[7466]

Hendriks, Cheryl (1996): Gender politics in a post-apartheid South Africa, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 14-24.[7467]

Irish, Jenni (1993): Women and political violence, in: Agenda, no. 16, pp. 5-9.[7468]

Jones, P.S. (2005): ‘A test of governance’, Rights-based struggles and the politics of HIV/AIDS policy in South Africa, in: Political Geography, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 419-447.[7469]

Kethusegile-Juru, Bookie Monica (2003): Intra-party democracy and the inclusion of women, in: Journal of African elections, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 49-62.[7470]

Klugman, Barbara (1994): Women in politics under Apartheid, A challenge to the new South Africa, in: Nelson, Barbara / Chowdhury, Najma (eds.): Women in politics worldwide, Yale University Press, New Haven / London, pp. 640-659.[7471]

Lewis, Desiree (2021): Governmentality and South Africa’s edifice of gender and sexual rights, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 109-119. [11810]

Maharaj, Nuthan / Maharaj, Brij (2004): Engendering local government in post-apartheid South Africa, Experiences from local councillors in Durban (1996-2000), in: Geo Journal, vol. 61, pp. 263-272.[7474]

McEwan, Cheryl (2003): Bringing government to the people, Women, local governance and community participation in South Africa, in: Geo Forum, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 469-481.[7473]

Meer, Shamin (2005): Freedom for women, Mainstreaming gender in the South African liberation struggle, in: Gender and Development, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 36-45.[7472]

Michalko, Jan (2020): Norms and discourses of class, Disciplinising young educated womnx’s political engagements, in: Politikon, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 269-286.[7475]

Morna, Coleen Lowe / Tolmay, Susan (2007): At the coalface, Gender and local government in Southern Africa, Gender Links, Johannesburg.[7476]

Mzamane, Mbulelo Vizikhungo (1994): Gender politics and the unfolding culture of liberation in South Africa, in: Women’s Studies, vol. 6, pp. 1-25.[7477]

Pankhurst, J. / Lush, L. (2004): The political economy of HIV: Lessons from a comparison of Uganda and South Africa, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 59, pp. 1913-1924.[7478]

Radhakrishnan, S. (2005): Time to show our true colours, the gendered politics of ‘Indianness’ in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Gender and Society, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 262-281.[7479]

Rangan, Haripriya / Gilmartin, Mary (2002): Gender, traditional authority, and the politics of rural reform in South Afria, in: Development and Change, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 633-658.[7480]

Samson, Melanie (2007): Developmental local government in postapartheid South Africa? A feminist rethinking of the state and development in the context of neo-liberalism, in: Africa Development, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 26-57.[7481]

Schäfer, Rita (2017): Gender-Politik zwischen Reformansätzen und Umsetzungsproblemen, in: De la Fontaine, Dana / Müller, Franziska et al. (Hrsg.), Das politische Systems Südafrikas, Springer Verlag, Wiesbaden, pp.393-412.[11600]

Scorgie, Fiona (2002): Virginity testing and the politics of sexual responsibility, Implications of AIDS intervention, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 55-75.[7482]

Sideris, Tina (2007): Post-apartheid South Africa, Gender, rights and the politics of recognition, New avenues for old forms of violence, in: Buur, Lars / Jensen, Steffen / Stepputat, Finn (eds.): The security development nexus, Expressions of sovereignty and securitization in Southern Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute/HSRC Press, Uppsala/Cape Town, pp. 233-250.[7483]

Walsh, Denise / Scully, Pamela (2006): Altering politics, contesting gender, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 1-12.[7484]

Religion - Christianity

Badstuebner, Jennifer (2003): “Drinking the hot blood of humans”, Witchcraft confessions in a South African Pentecostal Church, in: Anthropology and Humanism, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 8-22.[7700]

Burchardt, Marian (2007): Speaking to the converted? Religion and the politics of gender in South African AIDS discourse, in: Comparativ, vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 95-114.[7701]

Frahm-Arp, Maria (2010): Professional women in South African pentecostal charismatic churches, Brill Publishers, Leiden.[7702]

Gaitskell, Deborah (2007): Home and away: Creating female religious space for 20th-Century Anglican Missions in Southern Africa, in: Comparativ, vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 36-54.[7703]

Haddad, Beverly (1998): Constructing theologies of survival in the South Afrian context, The necessity of a critical engagement between postmodern and liberation theory, in: Journal of Feminist Studies of Religion, 14, pp. 5-18.[7704]

Haddad, Beverly (2004): The Manyano movement in South Africa, Site of struggle, survival and resistance, in: Agenda, 61, pp. 4-13.[7705]

Heuser, Andreas (2003): Bräute Christi, entlaufene Töchter und Prinzessin des Himmels, Symbolische Bricolage und rituelle Rebellion in Afrikanischen Unabhängigen Kirchen, in: Böll, Verena / Günther, Ursula et al. (Hg.): Umbruch – Bewältigung – Geschlecht, Genderstudien zu afrikanischen Gesellschaften in Afrika und Deutschland, Waxmann Verlag, Münster, pp. 131-149.[7706]

Heuser, Andreas (2007): „Contested charisma“, Reflections on the appearance and disappearance offemale visionary power in a South African Independent Church, in: Comparativ, vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 76-91.[7707]

Heuser, Andreas / Rosenfeld, Annette (2004): Gendered leadership in South African churches, A case studies of African Instituted Churches and the Dutch Reformed Church, in: Journal for the Study of Religion, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 67-101.[7708]

Kriel, Lize (2007): A space too vast and silent? German deaconesses and the patriarchy of the Berlin Mission in Apartheid Transvaal, in: Comparativ, vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 55-75.[7709]

Krüger, Gesine (2000): `I do desire to see my own land again…', Weiblichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in Südafrika, in: Stadtler, Katharina / Truper, Ursula (eds.): African women and cultural globalization, Rudiger Koeppe, Cologne, pp. 55-67.[7710]

Labode, Modupe (1993): From heathen kraal to Christian home: Anglican mission education and African Christian girls, 1850-1900, in: Bowie, Fiona / Kirkwood, Deborah / Ardener, Shirley (eds.): Women and missions: Past and present, Anthropological and historical perceptions, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 126-144.[7711]

Landman, Christina (1994): The piety of Afrikaans women, University of South Africa Press, Pretoria.[7712]

Landman, Christine (1996): The religious Krotoa (c.1642-1674), in: Kronos, Journal of Cape History, no. 23, pp. 22-35.[7713]

Lesejane, Desmond (2005): Through men, by men, for men, Christianity and the quest for gender equality, in: Agenda, Special Focus, pp. 78-79.[7714]

Magwaza, Thenjiwe (2004): Conversations with women of the Shembe church, Self perceptions and the role of the Zulu culture in formulating their status, in: Agenda, 60, pp. 136-144.[7715]

Marshall, Mandy / Taylor, Nigel (2006): Tackling HIV and AIDS with faith-based communities, Learning from attitudes on gender relations and sexual rights within evangelical churches in Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 363-374.[7716]

Meintjes, Sheila (1990): Family and gender in the Christian community at Edendale, Natal, in colonial times, in: Walker, Cherryl (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 125-145.[7717]

Monakali, Mandisa (1997): Challenging the church, in: Agenda, no. 36, pp. 98-99.[7718]

Mosala, Bernadette (1987): Assault on the family in South Africa, in: Eck, Diana / Jain, Devaki (eds.): Speaking of faith, Global perspectives on women, religion and social change, New Society Publishers, Philadelphia, pp. 50-60.[7719]

Muller, Carol Ann (1993): Life story of a Nazarite woman healer, Religious patriarchy redefined? in: Lademann-Priemer, Gabriele (ed.): Traditionelle Religion und christlicher Glaube, Widerspruch und Wandel, Verlag an der Lottbek/Peter Jensen, Ammersbek bei Hamburg, pp. 219-228.[7720]

Muller, Carol Ann (1996): Nazarite women, religious narrative and the construction of cultural truth and power, in: Daymond, M.J. (ed.): South African feminisms, Writing, theory and criticism, 1990-1994, Garland Publising, New York, pp. 155-168.[7721]

Muller, Carol Ann (1997): “Written into the book of life”: Nazarite women’s performance inscribed as spiritual text in Ibandla lamaNzatetha, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 3-14.[7722]

Muller, Carol Ann (1999): Rituals of fertility and the sacrifice of desire, Nazarite women’s performance in South Africa, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[7723]

Nadar, Sarojini (2002): Living in two worlds, Spirituality and the changing role of South -African Indian women in the Full Gospel Church, in: Reisenberger, Azilia (ed.): Women’s spirituality and the transformation of South Africa, Waxmann Verlag, Münster, pp. 73-82.[7724]

Nadar, Sarojini (2005): Searching the dungeons beneath our religious discourse, The case of violence against women and the ‘unholy trinity’, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 16-22.[7725]

Ndlazi, Thulani (2004): Men in church institutions and religious organisations, The role of Christian men in transforming gender relations and ensuring gender equality, in: Agenda, no. 61, pp. 62-65.[7726]

Ojong, Vivian Besem (2008): Religion and Ghanaian women entrepreneurship in South Africa, in: Journal for the Study of Religion, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 63-84.[7727]

Religion - Islam

Lee, Rebekah (2001): Conversion or continuum? The spread of Islam among African women in Cape Town, in: Social Dynamics, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 62-85.[8000]

Moosa, Najma (1995): The interim constitution and Muslim personal law, in: Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 167-184.[8001]

Moosa, Najma (2004): Unveiling the mind, A her-story of the legal position of women in Islam, Community Law Centre, UWC, Bellville.[8002]

O’Sullivan, Michelle (2001): Equality and democracy, Affording protection to existing Muslim personal law marriages, in: Agenda, no. 47, pp. 75-82.[8003]

Vahed, Goolam (2003): Muslim marriages in South Africa: the limitations and legacy of the Indian Relief Act of 1914, in: The Journal of Natal and Zulu History, vol. 21, pp. 1-40.[8004]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Badstuebner, Jennifer (2003): “Drinking the hot blood of humans”, Witchcraft confessions in a South African Pentecostal Church, in: Anthropology and Humanism, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 8-22.[10299]

Bähre, Erik (2002): Witchcraft and the exchange of sex, blood and money among Africans in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Journal of African Religion, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 300-334.[10300]

Niehaus, Isak (2002): Perversion of power, Witchcraft and the sexuality of the evil in the South African lowveld, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 269-299.[10301]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Abrahams, Naeema (2000): Research on rape survivors – What is wrong with a gender analysis? in: Agenda, no. 46, pp. 71-74.[10511]

Abrahams, Yvette (1996): Was Eva raped? An exercise in speculative history, in: Kronos, Journal of Cape History, no. 23, pp. 3-21.[10516]

Abrahams, Yvette (2001): Learning by doing, Notes towards the practice of womenist principles in the ‘new’ South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 50, pp. 71-76.[10517]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (2004): Sexual violence against intimate partners in Cape Town, Prevalence and risk factors reported by men, in: Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, 82, pp. 330-337.[10512]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (2005): What is the impact of witnessing mother abuse during childhood on South African men’s violence as adults? in: American Journal of Public Health, 95, pp. 1811-1816.[10513]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (2006): Intimate partner violence, Prevalence and risk factors for men in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Violence and Victims, 21, 2, pp. 247-264.[10514]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel / Laubsher, Ria (1999): “I don’t believe in democracy in the home“, Men’s relationships with and abuse of women, Study for the Medical Research Council, Tygerberg / Cape Town.[10515]

Adams, Hilda / Marshall, Anita (1998): Of target messages – Poverty, risk and sexual rights, in: Agenda, no. 39, pp. 87-92.[10520]

ADAPT (Agisanang Domestic Abuse Prevention and Training) (1997): Confronting violence against women, Men as part of the solution, unpublished study, Alexandra.[10518]

ADAPT (Agisanang Domestic Abuse Prevention and Training) (1998): The plight of young men, unpublished study, Alexandra.[10519]

Albertyn, C. / Artz, L. / Combrinck, H. et al. (2007): Women’s freedom and security of the person, in: Bonthuys, E. / Albertyn, C. (eds.): Gender, law and justice, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 295-381.[10523]

Albertyn, Catherine (1994): The discriminatory and gendered nature of the law and institutions of criminal justice, in: Jagwanth, Sarah / Schwikkard, Pamela-Jane / Grant, Brenda (eds.): Women and the law, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria, pp. 15-32.[10521]

Albertyn, Catherine (2005): Defending and securing rights through law, Feminism, law and the courts in South Africa, in: Politikon, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 217-238.[10522]

Allwood, C.W. (1987): Child abuse in South Africa, in: Steyn, Anna / Viljoen, Sylvia / Bosman, Francis (ed.): Marriage and family life in South Africa, Research Priorities, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria, pp. 406-416.[10524]

Altbeker, Antony (2003): Policing domestic violence, The enthusiasm gap, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 12, pp. 13-18.[10525]

Altman, Miriam / Kumalo, Patricia (1995): Combating sexual harassment, in: Agenda, no. 25, pp. 67-72.[10527]

Amir, M. (1982): Violent rape, in: Westhuizen, Jan van der (ed.): Crimes of violence in South Africa, University of South Africa Press, Pretoria, pp. 110-116.[10528]

Andersson, Neil / Mhatre, Sharmila (2003): Do unto others – and pay the price, Combating sexual violence in the south of Johannesburg, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 3, pp. 5-8.[10526]

Andersson, Neil / Mhatre, Sharmila (2003): Do unto others – and pay the price, Combating sexual violence in the south of Johannesburg, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 3, pp. 5-9.[10530]

Andersson, Neil / Mhatre, Sharmila / Mootsi, Nzwakie / Penderis, Marina (1999): How to police sexual violence, in: Crime and Conflict, no. 15, pp. 18-22.[10529]

Angless, Teresa (1990): An exploration into the counselling needs of battered women: A feminist perspective for clinical social work practice, unpublished MA thesis, Department of Social Work, University of Cape Town.[10531]

Angless, Teresa / Maconachie, Moira (1996): Battered women: Problems and proposals, in: Glanz, Lorraine / Spiegel, Andrew (eds.): Violence and family life in contemporary South Africa, Research and Policy Issues, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria, pp. 151-166.[10532]

Angless, Teresa / Maconachie, Moira / Van Zyl, Mikki (1998): Battered women seeking solutions, A South African study, in: Violence against Women, vol. 4, no. 6, pp. 637-658.[10533]

Armstrong, S. (1994): Rape in South Africa: An invisible part of apartheid’s legacy, in: Focus on Gender, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 35-39.[10534]

Artz, L. / Smythe, D. (2005): Bridges and barriers, A five year retrospective on the Domestic Violence Act, in: Acta Juridica, pp. 200-227.[10543]

Artz, L. / Smythe, D. (2007): Loosing ground, Making sense of attrition in rape cases, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 22, pp. 13-20.[10544]

Artz, L. / Smythe, D. (2008): Feminism versus the state? A decade of Sexual Offences Law Reform in South Africa, in: Agenda, 74.[10545]

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Malepe, Lebogang / Combrinck, Heléne (2000): Zikhethele – Use the law to end domestic violence, Community Law Centre / Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Bellville, Johannesburg. (second edition published in 2003 and edited by Bernedette Muthien).[10690]

Mashishi, Abner (2000): Wife battering: An exploration of the abuse of African women at two shelters in Johannesburg, in: Society in Transition, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 82-87.[10691]

Masimanyane CEDAW Working Group (1998): NGO shadow report to CEDAW South Africa, Focus: Violence against women, unpublished report, Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre, East London.[10692]

Masimanyane CEDAW Working Group (1999): Violence against women, An exploratory study of the impact of the justice system on victims / survivors of domestic violence and rape, unpublished research report, Masimanyane Women’s Support Centre, East London.[10693]

Matthews, S. / Vetten, L. et al. (2004): Every six hours a woman is killed by her intimate partner, A study of female homicide in South Africa, Medical Research Council Policy Brief, no. 5, Medical Research Council, Johannesburg/Cape Town.[10694]

Mayne, Anne / Levett, Ann (1977): The traumas of rape, Some considerations, in: South African Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, vol. 1, pp. 163-170.[10695]

Meel, B.L. (2003): A study of the prevalence of HIV seropositivity among rape survivals in Transkei, South Africa, in: Journal of Clinical Forensic Medicine, vol. 10, issue 2, pp. 65-70.[10696]

Meeth, P. (2003): Rethinking the ‘domus’ in domestic violence, Homelessness, space and domestic violence in South Africa, in: Geoforum, 34, no. 3, pp. 317-327.[10697]

Milton, J.R.L. (1985): Rape in marriage and assault in rape, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 102, part 3, pp. 367-370.[10698]

Milton, J.R.L. (1989): Law reform: Marital rape, in: South African Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 2, pp. 79-82.[10699]

Milton, J.R.L. (1999): Re-defining crime of rape, The law commissions proposals, in: South African Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 12, pp. 364-369.[10700]

Moffett, Helen (2001): Men’s roles and responsibilities in ending gender based violence, Entering the labyrinth, Coming to grips with gender war zones, The case of South Africa, INSTRAW Working Paper, no. 5, INSTRAW, New York.[10701]

Moffett, Helen (2006): ‘These women, they force us to rape them’, Rape as a narrative of social control in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 129-144.[10702]

Mogwe, Alice (1992): The economics of survival, What price do women have to pay ‘coping’ with violence, in: South African Political and Economic Monthly, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 3-6.[10703]

Molai, Yake (2006): The case of S V Zuma, Implications of allowing evidence of sexual history in rape trials, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 18, pp. 25-29.[10704]

Moletsane, Relebohile (2000): Talking back to the masters: Girls’ writing about experiences of violence, in: Agenda, no. 46, pp. 59-70.[10705]

Moolman, Benita (2004): The reproduction of an ‘ideal’ masculinity through gang rape on the Cape Flats, Understanding some issues and challenges for effective redress, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 109-123.[10706]

Moothoo-Padyachie, Nitasha (2004): Lesbian violence explored, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 81-86.[10707]

Motsei, Mmatshilo (2007): The Kanga and the Kangoroo court, Reflections on the rape trial of Jacob Zuma, Jacana Media, Durban/Johannesburg.[10708]

Motsei, Mmatshilo (1990): The best kept secret, Violence against domestic workers, Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Seminar Paper no. 5, Johannesburg.[10710]

Motsei, Mmatshilo (1993): Detection of women battering in health care settings: The case of Alexandra Health Clinic, Women’s Health Project, paper no. 30, Department of Community Health, Medical School, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.[10711]

Motsei, Mmatshilo (2007): The Kanga and the Kangaroo Court, Reflections on the Rape Trial of Jacob Zuma, Jacana Media, Durban.[10712]

Moult, Kelly (2005): Providing a sense of justice, Informal mechanism for dealing with domestic violence, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 12, pp. 19-24.[10709]

Msizi, Mtzigila / Zanda, Antoinette (1995): Networking against violence, in: Agenda, no. 26, pp. 79-82.[10713]

Mukasa, Veronica (1999): Talking about sexual harassment in school, in: Agenda, no. 41, pp. 58-60.[10714]

Murray, Christina (1987): Violence against women, Legal activism, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 3, pp. 382-388.[10715]

Muthien, Bernadette (2004): Strategic interventions, Intersection between gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS, in: Agenda, no. 59, pp. 93-99.[10716]

Nadar, Sarojiini (2005): Searching the dungeons beneath our religious discourse, The case of violence against women and the ‘unholy trinity’, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 16-22.[10717]

Naidoo, E. / Haffjee, S. / Vetten, L. / Hargreaves, S. (2005): On the margains, Violence against women with disabilities, CSVR, Johannesburg.[10719]

Naidoo, Kammila (2002): Reproductive dynamics in the context of domestic violence and economic insecurity, Findings of a South African case study, in: Journal of Asian and African Studise, vol. 37, pp. 376-400.[10720]

Naidu, Evashnee / Mkiza, Nonhlanhla (2005): Gender based violence, The lesbian and gay experience, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 34-39.[10718]

Nath, D. (2011): `We´l Show You You´re a Woman´, Violence and discrimination against Black lesbians and transgender men in South Africa, Human Rights Watch. New York.[11765]

Nix, Jennifer (1998): To protect and abuse: An exploratory study discussing intimate partners of police as victims of domestic abuse, Seminar paper no. 4, Publications of the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Johannesburg.[10721]

Novitz, Tonia (1996): The Prevention of Family Violence Act 1993, Issues in Law, Race and Gender, vol. 2, Publications of the Law, Race and Gender Research Unit, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.[10722]

Olivier, L. / Haasbroek, C.P. et al. (1991): The phenomenon of family murder in South Africa, An exploratory study, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria.[10724]

Olley, B.O. (2006): Association between sexual violence and psychiatric morbidity among HIV positive women in South Africa, in: African Journal of Medical Science, 35, Suppl., pp. 143-147.[10723]

Onyejekwe, Chineze (2004): The interrelationship between gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS in South Africa, in: Journal of International Women’s Studies, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 34-40.[10726]

Outwater, Anne / Abrahams, Naeema / Campbell, Jacquelyn C. (2005): Women in South Africa, Intentional violence and HIV/AIDS, Intersections and prevention, in: Journal of Black Studies, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 135-154.[10725]

Padayachee, Anshu (1993): Substance abusing spouses and inadequate social services: A dangerous mix of abused women in South Africa, in: Acta Criminologica, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 43-50.[10727]

Padayachee, Anshu / Manjoo, Rashida (1996): Domestic violence support service will fail without agency network, in: Agenda, no. 30, pp. 73-78.[10728]

Pandit, Shereen (2002): Women and oppression in South Africa, in: Journal of Gender Studies, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 67-78.[10729]

Parenzee, Penny / Artz, Lilian / Moult, Kelley (2001): Monitoring the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act, Final research report, 2000-2001, Publications of the Institute of Criminology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.[10730]

Park, Yoon Jung / Khan, Fatima (2000): Helping the hidden victims, Sheltering for children of abused women, in: Park, Yoon Jung / Fedler, Joanne / Dangor, Zubeda (eds.): Reclaiming women’s spaces, New perspectives on violence against women and sheltering in South Africa, NISSA Publications, Johannesburg, pp. 323-354.[10732]

Park, Yoon Jung / Peters, Rudashni / De Sa, Caron (2000): More than a simple refuge, Shelters for women in South Africa, in: Park, Yoon Jung / Fedler, Joanne / Dangor, Zubeda (eds.): Reclaiming women’s spaces, New perspectives on violence against women and sheltering in South Africa, NISSA Publications, Johannesburg, pp. 243-294.[10731]

Peltzer, Karl / Matlala, Mabeba (2003): Attitudes and practices of doctors toward domestic violence victims in South Africa, in: Health Care for Women International, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 149-157.[10733]

Pendry, Betsi (1998): The links between gender violence and HIV/AIDS, in: Agenda, no. 39, pp. 30-33.[10734]

Phiri, Isabel Apawo (2002): Domestic violence in christian homes, A Durban case study, in: Reisenberger, Azilia (ed.): Women’s spirituality and the transformation of South Africa, Waxmann Verlag, Münster, pp. 83-98.[10735]

Pillay, K. (2005): Battered women who kill, Avenues for legal/political resources, CSVR, Johannesburg.[10736]

Praeg, Leonard / Baillie, Michael (2011): Sexual violence, mythology, infant rape an the limits of the political, in: Politikon, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 257-274.[10737]

Pronyk, P.M. / Hargraeves, J.R. et al. (2006): Effects of a structural intervention for the prevention of intimate-partner violence and HIV in rural South Africa, A cluster randomised trial, in: Lancet, 368, pp. 1973-1983.[10738]

Redpath, Jean (2007): South Africa’s heart of darkness, Sex crimes and child offenders, Some trends, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 20, pp. 17-24.[10739]

Roehrs, Stefanie (2007): Implementing the unfeasible, Compulsory HIV testing for alleged sexual offenders, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 22, pp. 27-32.[10740]

Sathiparsad, Reshma (2005): ‘It is better to beat her’, Male youth in KwaZulu Natal speak on violence in relationships, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 79-88.[10741]

Schneider, V. / Vetten, L. (2006): Equal or different, Comparing women and men’s use of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), CSVR, Johannesburg.[10742]

Schäfer, Rita (2016): Frauen- und Menschenrechte im Kontrast zu geschlechtsspezifischer Gewalt und Xenophobie in Südafrika, in: Leicht, Imke / Meisterhans, Nadja / Löw, Christine / Volk, Katharina (Hrsg.), Feministische Kritiken und Menschenrechte, Barbara Budrich Verlag, Opladen, pp.133-147.[11602]

Schäfer, Rita (2008): Im Schatten der Apartheid, Frauen-Rechtsorganisationen und geschlechtsspezifische Gewalt in Südafrika, 2. aktualisierte Auflage, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[11603]

Smythe, D. (2004): Missed opportunities, Confiscation of weapons in domestic violence cases, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 10, pp. 19-26.[10743]

Smythe, D. / Artz, Lilian (2005): Money matters, Structural problems with implementing the DVA, in: Agenda, 66, pp. 24-32.[10744]

Smyths, Dee (2015): Rape Unresolved, Policing sexual offences in South Africa, UCT Press, Cape Town.[11819]

Strebel, A. / Crawford, T. / Shefer, T. (2006): Social construction of gender roles, gender-based violence and HIV/AIDS in two communities of the Western Cape, South Africa, in: Journal of Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 516-528.[10745]

Swarr, Amanda (2012): Paradoxes of butchness, Lesbian Masculinities and sexual violence in contemporary South Africa, in: Signs vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 961-86.[11733]

Thornberry, Elizabeth (2010): Sex, violence and the family in South Africa’s Eastern Cape, in: Burrill, Emily / Roberts, Richard / Thornberry, Elizabeth (eds.): Domestic violence and the law in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 117-137.[10746]

Vetten, L. / Budlender, D. / Schneider, V. (2005): The price of protection, Costing the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), CSVR, Johannesburg.[10749]

Vetten, L. / Jacobs, Tanja (2008): Towards developing and strengthening a comprehensive response to the health care needs of rape survivors, Policy Briefing, no. 1, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Johannesburg.[10751]

Vetten, L. / Jewkes, R. (2008): Tracking justice, The attrition of rape cases through the criminal justice system in Gauteng, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre / Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Johannesburg.[10752]

Vetten, L. / Schneider, L. (2006): Going somewhere slowly? A comparison of the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998) in an urban and semi-urban site, CSVR, Johannesburg.[10753]

Vetten, L. / van Jaarsveeld, F. (2008): The (mis)measure of harm, An analysis of rape sentences handed down in the regional and high courts of Gauteng Province, Working Paper, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Johannesburg.[10754]

Vetten, Lisa (2006): “Show me the money”, A review of budget allocated towards the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), in: Politicon, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 277-295.[10747]

Vetten, Lisa (2007): New crimes and old procedures, Can the new Sexual Offences Bill deliver on its promises? In: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 22, pp. 21-25.[10748]

Vetten, Lisa / Haffjee, Sadiyya (2005): Gang rape, A study of inner-city Johannesburg, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 12, pp. 31-36.[10750]

Wood, K. et al. (2005): Contextualizing group rape in post-Apartheid South Africa, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, 7, 4, pp. 303-117.[10755]

Wood, K. et al. (2007): Shoughing roughness in a beautiful way, Talk about love, coercion and rape in South African youth culture, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 277-300.[10756]

Wood, K. et al. (2008): Injuries are beyond love, Physical violence in young South Africans’ sexual relationships, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 43-69.[10757]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Albertyn, Cathi / Goldblatt, Beth (1998): The decriminalisation of gay sexual offences, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, 14, p. 461.[11205]

Albertyn, Cathy / Artz, L / Combrinck, Helen et al. (2007): Women’s freedom and security of the person, in: Bonthuys, E. / Albertyn, C. (eds.): Gender, law and justice, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 295-381.[11204]

Andrew, Nancy (1998): More than a football field! Access to land among South African rural women, in: L’Afrique Politique, n.N., pp. 87-106.[11206]

Andrews, Penelope (2001): The stepchild of national liberation, Women and rights in the new South Africa, in: Andrews, Penelope / Ellmann, Stephen (eds.): The post apartheid constitutions, Perspectives on South Africa’s basic laws, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 326-358.[11207]

Archer, Fiona / Meer, Shamim (1995): “A woman’s work is only recognised when it is not done”, Women, land tenure and land reform in Namaqualand’s Coloured Rural Reserves, Final Research Report, Surplus People Project, Cape Town. (veröffentlicht in: Meer, Shamim (ed.): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 84-94.)[11208]

Archer, Fiona / Meer, Shamim (2001): Women, tenure and land reform, The case of Namaqualand’s reserves, in: Crummings, Sarah / van Dam, Henk et al. (eds): Gender perspectives on property and inheritance, A global source book, KIT-Publications, Amsterdam, pp. 57-67.[11209]

Artz, Lilliam / Smythe, D. / Combrinck, Helen et al. (2006): Caught between policy and practice, Health and justice responses to gender based-violene, Crime, Violence and Injury Review, Medical Research Council, Cape Town.[11211]

Artz, Lillian / Smythe, D. (2005): Bridges and barriers, A five year retrospective on the Domestic Violence Act, in: Acta Juridica, pp. 200-227.[11210]

Bennett, T.W. (1991): A sourcebook of African customary law for Southern Africa, (assisted by N.S. Peart), Juta Press, Cape Town.[11212]

Bennett, T.W. (1994): The equality clause and customary law, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, vol. 10, pp. 122-130.[11213]

Bennett, T.W. (1999): Boundaries between African customary law and the constitution in South Africa, in: Rössler, Michael / Wendl, Tobias (eds.): Frontiers and borderlands, Anthropological perspectives, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M, pp. 187-197.[11214]

Bennett, T.W. (2000): The reform of customary marriage law in South Africa, in: Recht in Afrika, 1, pp. 1-24.[11215]

Bennett, T.W. / Murray, Christina et al. (eds.) (1994): Gender and the new South African legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town.[11216]

Bentley, Kristina (2004): Women’s human rights and the feminisation of poverty in South Africa, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol.31, no. 100, pp. 247-261.[11217]

Bentley, Kristina / Brookes, Heather (2005): The great leap sideways, Gender, culture and rights after 10 years of democracy in South Africa, in: Agenda Special Focus, pp. 1-13.[11218]

Bob, Urmilla (2000): Gender, and the role of the chieftaincy and rural women's access to land under the land reform program in KwaZulu-Natal, in: Alternation, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 48-49.[11219]

Bob, Urmilla (2002): Rural African women, food (in)security and agricultural production in the Ekutheleni land redistribution project, KwaZulu-Natal, in: Agenda, no. 51, pp.16-32.[11220]

Bohler-Muller, Narnia (2002): Other Possibilities?, Postmodern feminist legal theory in South Africa, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 614-629.[11221]

Bonthys, Elsje / Albertyn, Catherine (2007): Gender, law and justice, Juta Publishers, Cape Town.[11222]

Bronstein, Victoria (1994): The rape complainant at court, An analysis of legal discourse, in: Bennett, T.W. / Murray, Christina et al. (eds.): Gender and the new South Africa legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 202-227.[11223]

Buchmann, E.J. / Mensah, K. / Pillay, P. (2002): Legal termination of pregnancy among teenagers and older women in Soweto, 1999-2001, in: South African Medical Journal, vol. 92, no. 9, pp. 729-731.[11224]

Burman, Sandra / Barratt, Amanda (1993): Welfare law and bureaucracy in a changing South Africa, A case study of the state maintenance grant for the illegitimate, Centre for Applied Legal Studies, Working Paper, no. 19, Socio-Legal Unit, University of Cape Town.[11225]

Burman, Sandra / Dingle, Emma / Glasser, Nichola (2000): The new family court in action: An initial assessment, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 117, part 1, pp. 111-125.[11226]

Burman, Sandra / Huvers, Martine (1985): Church versus state? Divorce legislation and divided South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 116-135.[11227]

Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (1998): The legal system and spouse killing, study submitted to the Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Justice and the Committee of the Quality of Life and the Status of Women, unpublished study, Johannesburg.[11228]

Chambers, David (2000): Civilizing the natives, Marriage in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Daedalus, 129, 4, pp. 101-124.[11232]

Church, Jean (1995): Constitutional equality and the position of women in a multi-cultural society, in: Comparative and International Law Journal, vol. 28, pp. 289-299.[11233]

Claassens, A. / Smyths, D. (eds.) (2013): Marriage, land and custom, Essays on law and social change in South Africa, Juta Press, Cape Town.[11822]

Clark, Brigitte (2002): From rights to responsibilities? An overview of recent developments relating to the parent/child relationship in South African common law, in: The Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 216-235.[11234]

Combrinck, Heléne (1995): Monsters under the bed: Challenging existing views on the credibility of child witness in sexual offence cases, in: South African Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 326-330.[11229]

Combrinck, Heléne (1998): Positive state duties to protect women from violence, Recent South African Developments, in: Human Rights Quarterly, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 666-690.[11230]

Combrinck, Heléne (2003): Bail in sexual assault cases, Victims experiences, Second Research Report, 2002-2003, Publications of the Gender Project, Community Law Centre, UWC, Bellville.[11231]

Cope, June (1993): A matter of choice, Abortion law reform in Apartheid South Africa, Hadeda Books, Pietermaritzburg.[11235]

Copelon, Rhonda (1995): Sexual and reproductive rights, in: Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 190-216.[11236]

Costa, Anthony (1998): They myth of customary law, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, vol. 14, pp. 525-538.[11237]

Cross, Catherine (1999): Women and land in the rural crisis, in: Agenda, no. 42, pp. 12-27.[11238]

Curran, E. / Bonthuys, E. (2004): Customary law and domestic violence in rural South African communities, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11239]

Currie, Ian (1994): The future of customary law, Lessons from the lobola debate, in: Bennett, T.W. / Murray, Christina et al. (eds.): Gender and the new South Africa legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 146-184.[11240]

Daly, Kathleen (1989): Criminal justice ideologies and practices in different voices, Some feminist questions about justice, in: International Journal of the Sociology of Law, vol. 17, pp.1-18.[11246]

Davis, N. / Horn, A. / Wyk, S. (2004): `Invisible women', Making the case for supply-led, class-based, gender targeted land redistribution in South Africa, in: Geo Journal, vol. 61, no. 3, pp. 273-279.[11242]

Dawes, Andrew / Bray, Rachel / van der Merwe, Amelia (eds.) (2007): Monitoring child well-being, A South African rights-based approach, Human Science Research Council, Pretoria.[11241]

Dawuni, Jarpa (ed.) (2021): Gender, Judging and the Courts in Africa, Selected studies, Routledge, London.[11635]

De Koker, Jeanne (1998): African customary family law in South Africa, A legacy of many pasts, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 321-340.[11243]

De Vos, Pierre (1996): On the legal construction of gay and lesbian identity and South Africa's transitional constitution, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 265-290.[11244]

De Vos, Pierre (2000): The constitution made us queer, The sexual orientation clause in the South African constitution and the emergence of gay and lesbian identity, in: Stychin, A. / Herman, D. (eds.): Sexuality in the legal arena, The Athlone Press, London, pp. 194-207.[11245]

Deveaux, Monique (2003): Liberal constitutions and traditional cultures, The South African customary law debate, in: Citizenship Studies, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 161-179.[11247]

Dladla, J. / Hargraeves, S. / Greenberg, S. / Vetten, L. (2004): ‚That place is kwaMnyamandawo’, Fear and survival strategies among homeless women living in inner-city Johannesburg, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11248]

Fester, Gertrude (2006): Some preliminary thoughts on sexuality, citizenship and constitutions, Are rights enough? in: Agenda, no. 67, pp. 100-113.[11249]

Fishbayn, Lisa (1999): Litigating the right to culture, Family law in the new South Africa, in: International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 147-173.[11250]

Fuller, R. (2007): Bureaucracy versus democratisation, The promulgation of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and related matters) Amendment Bill, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11251]

Gerntholtz, L. / Nsibande, N. (2006): Using the law to secure women’s rights to housing and security of tenure, A brief examination of some key aspects of family and customary law and domestic violence legislation, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11252]

Goldbatt, Beth / McLean, K. (2011): Women´s social and economic rights, Juta Press, Cape Town.[11821]

Goldblatt, Beth (1997): A feminist perspective on the law reform process: An evaluation of attempts to establish a family court in South Africa, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, vol. 13, part 3, pp. 373-503.[11253]

Goldblatt, Beth (2006): Case note: Same sex marriage in South Africa, The constitutional court’s judegement, in: Feminist Legal Studies, vol. 14, p. 261.[11254]

Goldblatt, Beth (2009): Women and social and economic rights, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 407-605.[11255]

Goolam, Nazeem (1998): Constitutional interpretations of the “best interests” principle in South Africa in relation to custody, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 369-380.[11256]

Govender-Van Wyk, Sharmla (1999): Gender policy in land reform, in: Agenda, no. 42, pp. 66-68.[11257]

Haffejee, S. (2006): Waiting opportunities, Adolescent girls experiences of gender based violence at schools, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11258]

Hansson, Desirée (1994): Interim reflections on the Cape Attorney-General’s task group on rape, in: Jagwanth, Sarah / Schwikkard, Pamela-Jane / Grant, Brenda (eds.): Women and the law, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria, pp. 411-430.[11259]

Hansson, Desirée / Russell, Diana (1993): Made to fall in: The mythical option of legal abortion for survivors of rape and incest, in: South African Human Rights, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 500-524.[11260]

Hargreaves, S. / Vetten, L. et al. (2006): ‘Marriage is like sitting on red coals’, A case study of domestic violence in four villages of the Moretele District, Tshwane Metropole, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11265]

Hargreaves, Samantha (1999): Land reform: Putting gender at the centre, in: Agenda, no. 42, pp. 42-48.[11264]

Hargreaves, Samantha (1996): The land reform pilot programme: Capturing opportunities for rural women, in: Agenda, no. 30, pp. 18-25.[11263]

Hassim, Shireen (2018): Decolonising equality, The radical roots of the gender equality clause in the South African constitution, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 342–358. [11806]

Heaton, Jaqueline (2005): Striving for substantive equality in family law, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 21, part 4, pp. 547-574.[11261]

Heinrich Boell Foundation (ed.) (2002): Gender gaps in our constitutions, Women’s concern in selected African countries, Bookprint Creative Service, Nairobi/Berlin.[11262]

Human Rights Watch (1995): Violence against women in South Africa, State response to domestic violence and rape, Human Rights Watch Publications, New York.[11266]

Human Rights Watch (1997): South Africa, Violence against women and the medico legal system, Human Rights Watch Publications, vol. 9, no. 4A, New York.[11267]

Izumi, Kaori (2007): Reclaiming our lives, HIV and AIDS, Women’s land and property rights and livelihood in Southern and Eastern Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[11268]

Jacobs, Susie (1998): Past wrongs and gender rights: Issues and conflicts in South Africa’s land reform, in: European Journal of Development Research, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 70-87.[11269]

Jagwanth, Sarah (1995): The prevention of Family Violence Act 1993: A feminist critique, in: South African Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 1-11.[11270]

Jagwanth, Sarah / Schwikkard, Pamela-Jane / Grant, Brenda (eds.) (1994): Women and the law, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria.[11271]

James, Deborah (1988): Land shortage and inheritance in a Lebowa village, in: Social Dynamics, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 36-51.[11272]

Jewkes, Rachel / Brown, H. et al. (2002): Prevalence of morbidity associated with abortion before and after legislation in South Africa, in: British Medical Journal, 324, pp. 1252-1253.[11273]

Jewkes, Rachel / Brown, H. et al. (2003): Implementation of South Africa’s 1996 Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act, Service provisions after three years, in: Studies in Family Planning, 34, 4, pp. 277-284.[11274]

Judge, Melanie / Smythe, D. (2020): Striking women, The politics of gender, sexuality and the law in South Africa, in: Ashford, C. / Maine, A. (eds.): Research Handbook on gender, sexuality and the law, Edward Elgar, London, pp. 60–74.[11787]

Kaganas, Felicity (1986): Rape in marriage: Developments in South African law, in: International and Comparative Law Quarterly, vol. 35, pp. 456-461.[11275]

Kaganas, Felicity / Murray, Christina (1994): Law and women’s rights in South Africa, An overview, in: Acta Juridica, pp. 1-37. (und in: Bennett, T.W./ Murray, Christina et al. (eds.): Gender and the new South African legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, 1994, pp. 1-38.)[11276]

Kathree, Fayeeza (1995): Convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 11, part 3, pp. 421-437.[11277]

Keen, Jane / Vale, Clare (1997): An investigation into the effectiveness of interdicts granted in terms of the Prevention of Family Violence Act (133) 1993, unpublished study, National Institute for Crime Prevention and the Rehabilitation of Offenders (NICRO), Cape Town.[11278]

Kende, M. (2000): Gender stereotypes in South African and American constitutional law, The advantages of a pragmatic approach to equality and transformation, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 117, p. 745.[11279]

Kompe, Lydia / Small, Janet (1991): Demanding a place under the Kgotla tree, Rural women's access to land and power, Third World Legal Studies, pp. 137-156.[11280]

Labushangne, J.M.T. / van den Heever, J.A. (1997): Liability for adultery in South African indigenous law, Remarks on the juridical process of psychosexual autonomisation of women, in: Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 76-96.[11281]

Le Roux, Rochelle / Orleyn, Thandi / Rycroft, Alan (2005): Sexual harassment in the workplace, Law, policies and processes, Butterworths, Durban.[11282]

Le Roux, Wessel (2003): Sex work, the right to occupational freedom and the constitutional politics of recognition, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 120, no. 3, pp. 452-465.[11283]

Leutner, Carol E. (1999): The economic development approach to legal reform for rural women, A methodological approach, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 163-168.[11288]

Levin, Richard / Russon, Ray / Weiner, Daniel (1997): Class, gender and the politics of rural land reform, in: Levin, Richard / Weiner, Daniel (eds.): ‘No more tears…’, Struggles for land in Mpumalanga, South Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 117-136.[11284]

Lewin, T. / Williams, K. / Thomas, K. (2013): A progressive constitution meets lived reality, Sexuality and the law in South Africa. Evidence Report No 7, Sexuality, Poverty and the Law, Institute of Development Studies, IDS, Brighton, Sussex.[11791]

Lewis, Desireé / Salo, Elaine (1993): Birth control, contraception and women’s rights in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 17, pp. 59-68.[11289]

Liebenberg, Sandra (1995): Social and economic rights, A critical challenge, in: Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 79-96.[11286]

Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.) (1995): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town.[11285]

Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.) (1995): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town.[11287]

Lochrenberg, Margot / Stanton, Sharon (1995): Sexual assault survivors’ guide, Going to the police, district surgeon and court, Institute of Criminology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.[11290]

Loots, Lliane (2001): Know your legal rights, in: Agenda, no. 47, pp. 95-98.[11291]

Ludsin, Hallie / Vetten, Lisa (2005): Spiral of entrapment, Abused women in conflict with the law, Jacana Media, Johannesburg.[11292]

Mabandla, Brigitte (1990): Women’s rights, A discussion document, Publications of the Community Law Centre, University of the Western Cape, Bellville.[11293]

Mabandla, Brigitte (1992): A feminist critique of “The charter for social justice – A contribution to the South African Bill of Rights Debate”, Publications of the Community Law Centre, University of the Western Cape, Bellville.[11294]

Mabandla, Brigitte (1995): Women in South Africa and the constitution-making process, in: Peters, Julie / Wolper, Andrea (eds.): Women’s rights – human rights, International feminist perspectives, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 67-71.[11295]

Mabandla, Brigitte et al. (ed.) (1991): Women’s rights, A discussion document, Community Law Centre, University of the Western Cape, Bellville.[11296]

Maithufi, I.P. / Bekker, J.C. (2002): The recognition of the Customary Marriages Act of 1998 and its impact on family law in South Africa, in: The Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 182-197.[11297]

Malepe, Lebogang / Combrinck, Heléne (2000): Zikhethele – Use the law to end domestic violence, Community Law Centre / Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Bellville, Johannesburg. (second edition published in 2003 and edited by Bernedette Muthien).[11298]

Malherbe, V.C. (2005): `In onegt verwekt´, Law, custom and illegitimacy in Cape Town, 1800-1840, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 163-186.[11299]

Manjoo, Rashida (2005): Gender rights within the framework of traditional or group cultural norms and rights, in: Agenda, Special Focus, pp. 80-83.[11300]

Marcus, Tessa (1990): Land reform: Considering national, class and gender issues, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 178-194.[11301]

Maree, Gert (2003): You strike for a woman, you strike a rock! Paradox in worker performances and women's rights, in: Anthropology Southern Africa, vol. 26, no. 3/4, pp. 150-158.[11302]

Martabano, Ashley / O’Sullivan, Michelle (2004): Three steps forward, two steps back, Legal activism for women’s rights in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 55-61.[11303]

Matshiqi, A. (2007): Undamaged reputations? Implications for the South African criminal justice system of the allegations against and the prosecution of Jacob Zuma, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11304]

Matthias, Carmel (1994): The rights of maternity benefits, in: Agenda, no. 22, pp. 6-10.[11305]

Matthias, Carmel (1995): Achieving effective maternity rights in a post-apartheid South Africa, Is the new constitution adequate? in: Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 247-260.[11306]

McClendon, Thomas (1995): Tradition and domestic struggle in the courtroom, Customary law and the control of women in segregation-era Natal, in: The International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 527-561.[11307]

McClendon, Thomas (2002): Genders and generations apart, Labour tenants and customary law in segregation-era South Africa, 1920s to 1940s, James Currey, Oxford.[11308]

Meer, Shamin (1997): Gender and land rights, The struggle over resources in post-apartheid South Africa, in: IDS Bulletin (Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies), vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 133-144.[11310]

Meer, Shamin (1997): Land affairs and agriculture, in: Budlender, Debbie (ed.): The second women’s budget, IDASA Publications, Cape Town, pp. 167-199.[11311]

Meer, Shamin (1999): Constraints to land reform and gender equity goals, in: Agenda, Special issue on empowering women, pp. 78-98.[11312]

Meer, Shamin (ed.) (1997): Women, land and authority, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town.[11313]

Meide, Wayne van der (1999): Gender equality versus right to culture, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 116, part 1, pp. 100-112. [11309]

Mhago, Fanelwa / Samson, Melanie (2001): A gender analysis of recent South African land reform, in: Buregeya, Alfred / Garling, Marguerite et al. (eds.): Women’s land and property rights in situations of conflict and reconstruction, UNIFEM Publications, New York, pp. 113-120.[11314]

Middleton, A.J. (1991): A critical evaluation of legal procedures to prevent family violence, in: South African Journal of Criminal Justice, vol. 4, pp. 2-8.[11315]

Mokgope, Kgopotso (2000): The mismatch between land policy and improved livelihood opportunities for women, in: Agenda, no. 46, pp. 62-88.[11316]

Mokgope, Kgopotso (2000): Land reform, sustainable livelihoods and gender relations, A case study of Gallawater A Farm, School of Government, Programme for Land and Agrarian Studies, Research Report no. 5, Bellville.[11317]

Moosa, Najma (1995): The interim constitution and Muslim personal law, in: Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 167-184.[11318]

Moosa, Najma (2004): Unveiling the mind, A her-story of the legal position of women in Islam, Community Law Centre, UWC, Bellville.[11319]

Motsei, Mmatshilo (2007): The Kanga and the Kangoroo court, Reflections on the rape trial of Jacob Zuma, Jacana Media, Durban/Johannesburg.[11320]

Moult, Kelley (2005): Providing a sense of justice, Informal mechanisms for dealing with domestic violence, in: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 12, pp. 19-24.[11321]

Murray, Christina (1987): Violence against women, Legal activism, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 3, pp. 382-388.[11322]

Murray, Christina / Kaganas, Felicity (1994): Law and women’s rights in South Africa, An overview, in: Murray, Christina (ed.): Gender and the new South Africa legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 1-38.[11323]

Naidoo, E. / Haffjee, S. / Vetten, L. / Hargreaves, S. (2005): On the margains, Violence against women with disabilities, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11324]

Naidoo, Marie-Therese (2000): Making the law accessible to women, in: Agenda, no. 44, pp. 109-110.[11325]

Ngqualeni, Malijeng / Makhura, Moraka (1996): Analysis of women’s status in agricultural development in the Northern Province, in: Lipton, Michael / Ellis, Frank / Lipton, Merle (eds.): Land, labour and livelihoods in rural South Africa, vol. 2, Kwa-Zulu Natal and Northern Province, Indicator Press, Durban, pp. 335-356.[11330]

Ngubane, Sizani (1999): Title to the land? in: Agenda, no. 42, pp. 7-11.[11331]

Nhlapo, Thandabantu (1998): African family law under an undecided constution, The challenge of law reform in South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 617-625.[11326]

Nhlapo, Thandabantu (1995): Cultural diversity, Human rights and the family in contemporary Africa: Lessons from the South African constitutional debate', in: International Journal of Law and the Family, 9, p. 208.[11327]

Nhlapo, Thandabantu (1995): African customary law in the interim constitution, in: Liebenberg, Sandra (ed.): The constitution of South Africa from a gender perspective, David Philip Publishers, Cape Town, pp. 157-166.[11328]

Nhlapo, Thandabantu (2000): The African customary law of marriage and the rights conundrum, in: Mamdani, Mahmood (ed.): Beyond rights talk and culture talk, Comparative essays on the politics of rights and culture, St. Martin Press, New York, pp. 136-148.[11329]

Novitz, Tonia (1996): The Prevention of Family Violence Act 1993, Issues in Law, Race and Gender, vol. 2, Publications of the Law, Race and Gender Research Unit, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.[11332]

Nyamende, Abner (1996): Martha has no land, The tragedy of identity in The Marabi Dance, in: Darian-Smith, K. / Gunner, L. / Nuttal, S. (eds.): Text, theory, space: Land, literature and history in South Africa and Australia, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 191-201.[11333]

Olaussen, Maria (1996): Law and legislative intervention, in: Glanz, Lorraine / Spiegel, Andrew (eds.): Violence and family life in contemporary South Africa, Research and Policy Issues, Human Science Research Council Publications, Pretoria, pp. 233-270.[11334]

Oomen, Barbara (1998): We want to secure our hope - Women and land rights in South Africa, in: Netherlands Institute for Southern Africa (ed.): Women challenging society - Stories of women’s empowerment in Southern Africa, Amsterdam, pp. 11-18.[11335]

O’Regan, Catherine (1994): Equality at work and the limits of the law, Symmetry and individualism in anti-discrimination legislation, in: Bennett, T.W. / Murray, Christina et al. (eds.): Gender and the new South Africa legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 64-83.[11336]

O’Sullivan, Michelle (1994): Stereotyping and male identification, ‘Keeping women in their place’, in: Bennett, T.W. / Murray, Christina et al. (eds.): Gender and the new South Africa legal order, Juta Press, Cape Town, pp. 185-201.[11337]

O’Sullivan, Michelle (1996): ‘The Termination of Pregnancy Bill’ faces a contested passage, in: Agenda, no. 30, pp. 79-83.[11338]

O’Sullivan, Michelle (2001): Equality and democracy, Affording protection to existing Muslim personal law marriages, in: Agenda, no. 47, pp. 75-82.[11339]

Paliwala, Abdul (1993): Family transformation and family law, Some African developments in financial support on relationship breakdown, in: Adelman, Sammy / Paliwala, Abdul (eds.): Law and crisis in the Third World, Hans Zell Publishers, London, pp. 270-300.[11340]

Pillay, K. (2005): Battered women who kill, Avenues for legal/political resources, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11341]

Pillay, Navi (1994): Equality and customary law, in: Agenda, no. 20, pp. 44-47.[11342]

Rascher, S.B. (1996): Researchin the indigenous law of marriage in South Africa, An anthropological perspective, in: South African Journal of Ethnography, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 46-49.[11343]

Rubin, Leslie (1965): The adaptation of African family law in South Africa, in: Kuper, Hilda / Kuper, Leo (eds.): African law, Adaptation and development, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 196-195.[11344]

Schneider, V. / Vetten, L. (2006): Equal or different, Comparing women and men’s use of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), CSVR, Johannesburg.[11345]

Schäfer, Rita (2016): Frauen- und Menschenrechte im Kontrast zu geschlechtsspezifischer Gewalt und Xenophobie in Südafrika, in: Leicht, Imke / Meisterhans, Nadja / Löw, Christine / Volk, Katharina (Hrsg.), Feministische Kritiken und Menschenrechte, Barbara Budrich Verlag, Opladen, pp.133-147.[11601]

Schäfer, Rita (2005): Im Schatten der Apartheid, Geschlechtsspezifische Gewalt und Frauen-Rechtsorganisationen in Südafrika, Lit-Verlag, Münster-Berlin.[11347]

Sloth-Nielsen, Julia / van Heerden, Belinda (1998): Signposts on the road to equality, Towards the new millenium for parents, children and families in South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 353-368.[11346]

Smythe, D. / Jefthas, D. et al. (2007): Sexual offences and HIV/AIDS, Challenges for magistrates, Report, guidelines and recommendations, UCT, Cape Town.[11348]

Steyn, Elsa (1998): From closet to constitution, The South African gay family rights odyssey, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 405-432.[11349]

Vahed, Goolam (2003): Muslim marriages in South Africa: the limitations and legacy of the Indian Relief Act of 1914, in: The Journal of Natal and Zulu History, vol. 21, pp. 1-40. [11350]

Van der Spuy, E. / Parmentier, S. / Dissel, A. (eds.) (2007): Restorative justice, Politics, policies and prospects, Juta Press, Cape Town.[11352]

Van Merle, Karin (2006): Sex, gender and becoming, Post-Apartheid reflections, Pretoria University Law Press, Pretoria.[11351]

Vetten, Lisa (2006): “Show me the money”, A review of budget allocated towards the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), in: Politicon, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 277-295.[11353]

Vetten, Lisa (2007): New crimes and old procedures, Can the new Sexual Offences Bill deliver on its promises? In: South African Crime Quarterly, no. 22, pp. 21-25.[11354]

Vetten, Lisa / Budlender, D. / Schneider, V. (2005): The price of protection, Costing the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998), CSVR, Johannesburg.[11355]

Vetten, Lisa / Gerntholtz, L. (2006): Zuma trial, Lessons for future rape trials, in: South African Labour Bulletin, August / Sept. 2006.[11356]

Vetten, Lisa / Jacobs, Tanja (2008): Towards developing and strengthening a comprehensive response to the health care needs of rape survivors, Policy Briefing, no. 1, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Johannesburg.[11358]

Vetten, Lisa / Jewkes, R. (2008): Tracking justice, The attrition of rape cases through the criminal justice system in Gauteng, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre / Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation, Johannesburg.[11359]

Vetten, Lisa / Schneider, L. (2006): Going somewhere slowly? A comparison of the implementation of the Domestic Violence Act (no. 116 of 1998) in an urban and semi-urban site, CSVR, Johannesburg.[11357]

Vetten, Lisa / van Jaarsveeld, F. (2008): The (mis)measure of harm, An analysis of rape sentences handed down in the regional and high courts of Gauteng Province, Working Paper, Tshwaranang Legal Advocacy Centre, Johannesburg.[11360]

Walker, Cherryl (2005): The limits of land reform, Rethinking ‘the land question’ in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 805-824.[11361]

Walker, Cherryl (2005): Women, gender policy and land reform in South Africa, in: Politikon, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 297-316.[11362]

Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett (1996): Reconstructing tradition, Women and land reform, in: Rich, Paul (ed.): Reaction and renewal in South Africa, St. Martin Press, New York, pp. 144-169.[11363]

Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett (1998): Constitutional interpretation and the re-constitution of the family in the United States and South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 463-482.[11364]

society - families marriages

Bak, Maren (2008): Townships in transition, Women’s caring keeps the township together, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 255-267.[8865]

Bhana, Deevia / Clowes, Lindsay / Morrell, Richard / Shefer, Tamara (2008): Pregnant girls and young parents in South African schools, in: Agenda, no. 76, pp. 78-89.[8866]

De Koker, Jeanne (1998): African customary family law in South Africa, A legacy of many pasts, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 321-340.[8867]

Dooling, Wayne (2005): The making of a colonial elite: Property, family and landed stability in the Cape Colony, c. 1750-1834, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 147-162.[8868]

Duflo, Esther (2003): Grandmothers and granddaughters, Old age pensions and intrahousehold allocation in South Africa, in: World Bank Economic Review, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 1-25.[8869]

Goolam, Nazeem (1998): Constitutional interpretations of the “best interests” principle in South Africa in relation to custody, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 369-380.[8870]

Hochfeld, Tessa (2008): ‘Influencing … it is our role, it is our duty’, How social workers unintentionally reinforce conservative ideas of the family, in: Agenda, no. 76, pp. 92-103.[8871]

Hunter, Marc (2004): Fathers without 'amandla'? Gender and fatherhood among isiZulu speakers, in: The Journal of Natal and Zulu History, vol. 22, pp. 149-160. [8872]

Jeannes, Lisa / Shefer, Tamara (2003): Discourses of motherhood among a group of South African mothers, in: Jenda, 5.[8873]

Kotze, J.C. / van der Waal, C.S. (1995): Violent social relationships and family life in two Transvaal lowveld settlements, HSCR Publication, Pretoria.[8874]

Krige, Eileen (1936): Changing conditions in marital relations and parental duties among urbanized natives, in: Africa, vol. 9, pp. 21-23.[8875]

Longmore, Laura (1959): The dispossessed, A study of the sex-life of Bantu women in urban areas in and around Johannesburg, Jonathan Cape Publishers, Cape Town.[8876]

Marwick, Max (1978): Household composition and marriage in a Witwatersrand African township, in: Argyle, W.J / Preston Whythe, E.M. (eds.): Social system and tradition in Southern Africa, Oxford University Press, Cape Town, pp. 36-54.[8877]

Nhlapo, Thandabantu (1998): African family law under an undecided constution, The challenge of law reform in South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 617-625.[8878]

Phoofolo, Pule (2005): Female extramarital relationships and their regulation in early colonial Thembuland, South Africa, 1875-1895, in: Journal of Family History, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 3-47.[8879]

Sathiparsad, Reshma / Taylor, Myra / Dlamini, Siyabonga (2008): Patriarchy and family life, Alternative views of male youth in rural South Africa, in: Agenda, vol. 76, pp. 4-16.[8880]

Sloth-Nielsen, Julia / van Heerden, Belinda (1998): Signposts on the road to equality, Towards the new millenium for parents, children and families in South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 353-368.[8881]

Steyn, Elsa (1998): From closet to constitution, The South African gay family rights odyssey, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 405-432.[8882]

Urdang, S. (2006): Women and the politics of care in Southern Africa, The care economy. Gemder and the silent AIDS crisis in Southern Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 165-177.[8883]

Van Zyl, Mikki (2011): Are same-sex marriages unAfrican? Same-sex relationships and belonging in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Journal of Social Issues, vol. 67, no. 2, pp. 335–357.[11789]

Walker, Cheryl (2005): Conceptualizing motherhood in twentieth century South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 417-437.[8884]

Woodhouse, Barbara Bennett (1998): Constitutional interpretation and the re-constitution of the family in the United States and South Africa, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 463-482.[8885]

Ziel, Susan (2004): Globalization and family patterns, A view from South Africa, in: Therborn, Goran (ed.): African families in a global context, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 98-118. [8886]

Ziel, Susan (2005): Families in South Africa, in: Adam, B. / Trost, J. (eds.): Handbook of world families, Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks. [8887]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Xaba, Makhosazana / Martin, Karen (eds.) (2017): Queer Africa 2, New Stories, Ma Thoko´s, Braamfontein / Johannesburg.[11748]

Achmat, Taghmeda / Raizenberg, Theresa (2003): Midi and Theresa, Lesbian activism in South Africa, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 643-652.[9076]

Achmat, Zackie (1993): Apostels of civilized vise, Immoral practices and and unnatural practices in South Africas prisons and componds, 1890-1920, in: Social Dynamics, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 92-110.[9077]

Albertyn, Cathi / Goldblatt, Beth (1998): The decriminalisation of gay sexual offences, in: South African Journal of Human Rights, 14, p. 461.[9078]

Andrews, Grant (2020): Queer Cyborgs in South African Speculative Fiction, Moxyland by Lauren Beukes and The Prey of Gods by Nicky Drayden, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, pp. 128-143.[11710]

Andrews, Grant (2019): The emergence of black queer characters in three post-apartheid novels, in: Tydskrif vir Letterkunde vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 1-9.[11737]

Anguita, Luis Abolafia (2011): Tackling corrective rape in South Africa, The engagement between LGBTI CSOs and NHRIs (CGE and SAHRC) and its role, International Journal of Human Rights.[9079]

Baderoon, Gabeba (2015): "I Compose Myself", Lesbian Muslim Autobiographies and the Craft of Self-Writing in South Africa, in: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 897-915. [11739]

Barnard-Naudé, J. (2010): Post-apartheid fraternity, post-apartheid democracy, post-apartheid sexuality, Queer reflections on Jane Alexander’s Butcher Boys, in: Leckey, R, Brooks, K (eds.), Queer Theory, Law, Culture, Empire, Routledge, London, pp. 69–85. [11795]

Bloch, Joanne (2005): Balancing act, South African gay and lesbian youth speak out, New Africa Education, Johannesburg.[9080]

Burger, Bibi (2020): The Relationship between Futurity and the Rurality and Urbanity of Spaces in the Queer African Science Fiction of Triangulum by Masande Ntshanga, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 112-127.[11709]

Carolin, Andy (2021): Post-Apartheid same-sex sexualities, Restless identities in literary and visual culture, Routledge, London/New York.[11713]

Charney, C. (1995): The Charney report, Report on Gay and Lesbian and AIDS related questions in the HSRC Bi-Annual Survey, HSRC, Johannesburg.[9081]

Clowes, Lindsay (2003): Historical representations of race, masculinity and homosexuality, in: Ratele, K. / Duncan, N. (eds.): Social psychology, identities and relationships, University of Cape Town, Cape Town.[9082]

Cock, Jacklyn (2003): Engendering gay and lesbian rights, The equality clause in the South African constitution, in: Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 35-45.[9083]

Conway, Daniel (2009): Queering Apartheid, The National Party’s 1987 ‘Gay rights’ election campaign in Hillbrow, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 849-836.[9084]

Croucher, Sheila (2002): South Africa’s democratisation and the politics of gay liberation, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 315-330.[9085]

Currier, Ashley (2012): Out in Africa, LGBTI organzing in Namibia and South Africa, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[9086]

De Vos, Pierre (1996): On the legal construction of gay and lesbian identity and South Africa's transitional constitution, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 265-290.[9088]

De Vos, Pierre (2000): The constitution made us queer, The sexual orientation clause in the South African constitution and the emergence of gay and lesbian identity, in: Stychin, A. / Herman, D. (eds.): Sexuality in the legal arena, The Athlone Press, London, pp. 194-207.[9089]

De Waal, S. / Manicon, A. (eds.) (2006): Pride, Protests and celebrations, Jacana, Cape Town/Johannesburg.[9087]

Dirsuwait, Theresa (2006): The problem of identities, in: Ballard, R. / Habib, A. / Valodia, I. (eds.): Voices of protest, University of KwaZulu Natal Press, Scottsville, pp. 325-347.[9090]

Dlamini, Busangokwakhe (2006): Homosexuality in the African context, in: Agenda, vol. 2,3 pp. 128-136. [9091]

Donham, Donald (1998): Freeing South Africa, The modernization of male-male sexuality in Soweto, in: Cultural Anthropology, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 3-21.[9092]

Drew, Marion (2008): A different fight for freedom, GALA, Johannesburg.[11831]

Dunton, Chris / Palmberg, Mai (1996): Human rights and homosexuality in Southern Africa, Current African Issue, no. 19, The Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[9093]

Edwards, Ian / Epprecht, Marc (2020): Working Class Homosexuality in South African History, Voices from the Archives, Lynne Rienner, Boulder.[11839]

Elder, G. (1995): Of Moffies, Kaffirs and Perverts, Male homosexuality and the discourse of moral order in the Apartheid state, in: Bell, David / Valentine, Gill (eds.): Mapping Desire, Routledge, London, pp. 56-65.[11830]

Elder, Glen (1998): The South African body politic, Exploring the spatial links between racism and compulsory heterosexuality, in: Pile, S. / Nast, H. (eds.): Places through the body, Routlege, London.[9094]

Elder, Glen (2005): Somewhere over the rainbow, Cape Town, South Africa as a ‘gay destination’, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 43-59.[9095]

Fester, Gertrude (2006): Some preliminary thoughts on sexuality, citizenship, and constitutions. Are rights enough? in: Agenda, 67, pp. 100-111.[11833]

Germond, Paul / De Gruchy, Steve (1997): Aliens in the household of god, Homosexuality and christian faith in South Africa, David Philip, Cape Town/Johannesburg.[9096]

Gevisser, Mark (2020): The pink line, Profile Books, London.[11568]

Gevisser, Mark (2000): Mandelas stepchildren, in: Drucker, P. (ed.): Different rainbows, Gay Men’s Press, London, pp. 111-136.[9097]

Gevisser, Mark / Cameron, Edwin (eds.) (1995): Defiant desire, Gay and lesbian lives in South Africa, Raven, Johannesburg / Routledge, New York.[9098]

Goddard, Keith (2004): A fair representation, GALZ and the history of the gay movement in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 75-98.[9099]

Goldblatt, Beth (2006): Case note: Same sex marriage in South Africa, The constitutional court’s judegement, in: Feminist Legal Studies, vol. 14, p. 261.[9100]

Gontek, I. (2009): Sexual violence against lesbian women in South Africa, in: Outliers, A Collection of Essays and Creative Writing on Sexuality in Africa, vol. 2, pp. 1–18. [11783]

Gqola, Pumla Dineo (2011): Through Zanele Muholi’s eyes, Re/imaginaging ways of seeing Black lesbians,in: Tamale, Sylvia (ed.): African Sexualities, A Reader, Pambazuka, Oxford.[11838]

Gunkel, Henriette (2010): The cultural politics of female sexuality in South Africa, Routledge, New York / London. [11759]

Harries, Patrick (1990): Symbols and sexuality, Culture and identity on the early Witwatersrand gold mines, in: Gender and History, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 318-336.[9101]

Hattingh, C. / Spencer, J.P. (2020): Homosexual not homogeneous, A motivation-based typology of gay leisure travelers holidaying in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Journal of Homosexuality, vol. 67, no. 6, pp. 768–792.[11801]

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton.[9102]

Hoad, Neville / Martin, Karen / Reid, Graeme (eds.) (2005): Sex and politics in South Africa, Double Storey Books, Cape Town.[9103]

Holland-Muter, Susan (2013): Outside the safety zone, An agenda for research on violence against lesbian and gender-nonconforming women in South Africa, MaThoko´s Books, Braamfontein, Johannesburg.[11782]

Holland-Muter, Susan (2019): Making place, making home, Lesbian queer world-making in Cape Town, in: Revista Estudos Feministas, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 1-14.[11803]

Holmes, Rachel (1995): Queer comrades, Winnie Mandela and the moffies, in: Social Text, 52/53, no. 3-4, pp. 161-180.[9104]

Isaack, Wendy / Judge, Melanie (2004): Ten years of freedom? Current developments and debates on marriage between people of the same sex in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 62, pp. 68-75.[9106]

Isaacs, G. / McKendrick, B. (1992): Male homosexuality in South Africa, Identity formation, culture and crisis, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[9105]

Jara, Mazibuko / Lapinsky, Sheila (1998): Forging a representative gay liberation movement in South Africa, in: Development Update, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 44-56.[9107]

Jolly, Rosemary (1996): ‘Intersecting marginalities’, The problem of homophobia in South African women’s writing, in: Hawley, John (ed.): Cross-addressing, Resistance literature and cultural borders, State University of New York Pess, New York, pp. 107-120.[9108]

Jones, Tiffany (2008): Averting white male (ab)normalitiy, Psychatric representations and treatment of ‘homosexuality’ in 1960s South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 397-410.[9109]

Judge, M. / Manicon, A. / De Waal, S. (2001): To have and to hold, The making of same-sex marriage in South Africa, Fanele, Johannesburg.[9110]

Judge, Melanie (2021): Queer at 25, A critical perspective on queerness, politics and futures, in: Journal of African and Asian Studies, vol. 56, no. 1, pp. 120-134. [11751]

Judge, Melanie (2018): Blackwashing homophobia, Violence and the politics of sexuality, gender and race, Routledge, London.[11757]

Judge, Melanie / Smythe, D. (2020): Striking women, The politics of gender, sexuality and the law in South Africa, in: Ashford, C. / Maine, A. (eds.): Research Handbook on gender, sexuality and the law, Edward Elgar, London, pp. 60–74.[11786]

Klein, Thamar (2008): Queering medical and legal discourses of queer sexes and genders in South Africa, in: Anthropoloy Matters, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 1-17.[9111]

Kok, Anton (2001): Homosexuality, the bill of rights and the unlawfulness criterion in the law of delict, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 102-114.[9112]

Kok, Anton (2001): Homosexuality, the bill of rights and the unlawfulness criterion in the law of delict, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 118, no. 1, pp. 102-114.[9119]

Krouse, Matthew / Berman, Kim (1993): The invisible ghetto, Lesbian and gay writing from South Africa, COSAW Publishing, Johannesburg.[9113]

Lake, Nadine (2014): Black lesbian bodies, Reflections on a queer South African archive, in: Africa Insight, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 69-83.[11835]

Leap, W. (2001): Strangers on the train, Sexuality, citizenship, and the politics of public transport in Apartheid South Africa, in: Cruz-Malave, A. / Manalansan, M.F. (eds.): Queer globalization, local homosexualities, Citizenship, sexualities and afterlife of colonialism, New York University Press, New York.[9114]

Leap, W. (2002): Language, belonging and (homo)sexual citizenship in Cape Town, South Africa, in: Leap, W. / Boellsdorff, T. (eds.): Pleasure in language, Language, globalization and ‘new’ articulation of same-sex desire, University of Illinois Press, Urbana.[9115]

Lewin, T. / Williams, K. / Thomas, K. (2013): A progressive constitution meets lived reality, Sexuality and the law in South Africa. Evidence Report No 7, Sexuality, Poverty and the Law, Institute of Development Studies, IDS, Brighton, Sussex.[11790]

Lewis, Desiree / Baderoon, Gabeba (eds.) (2021): Surfacing, On being black and feminist in South Africa, Wits University Press, Johannesburg.[11926]

Livermon, Xavier (2012): Queer(y)ing freedom, Black queer visibilities in postapartheid South Africa, in: GLQ, a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 18, no. 2-3, pp. 297-323. [11754]

Lock Swarr, Amanda / Nagar, Richa (2004): Dismantling assumptions, Interrogating ‘lesbian’ struggles for identity and survival in India and South Africa, in: Signs, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 491-516.[9116]

Louw, Ronald (2001): Mkhumbane and the new traditions of (un)African same-sex weddings, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 287-296.[9117]

Luirink, Bart (2000): Moffies, Gay and lesbian life in Southern Africa, David Philip, Cape Town.[9118]

Ma, Ming-Yuen S. / Juhasz, Alexandra (2013): Queer media loci, South Africa, in: GLQ, a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 381-403. [11753]

Macheso, Wesley P. (2020): Vulnerability and the(im)possibilities of becoming, transgenderism in contemporary South African life writing, in: African Identities, pp. 1-14.[11736]

Marnell, John (2021): Seeking sanctuary, Stories of sexuality, faith and migration, Wits University Press, Johannesburg. [11766]

Mason, Paul (2016): Masculinity against the grain in Damon Galgut’s The beautiful screaming of pigs, André Carl van Merwe’s Moffie and Koos Prinsloo’s Jonkmanskas, in: Scrutiny2, Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa, vol. 21, issue 3, pp. 73-93.[11706]

Matebeni, Zethu (2012): Black lesbian sexualities and identity in South Africa, An ethnography of black lesbian urban life, LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, Saarbrücken.[11836]

Matebeni, Zethu (2013): Intimacy, Queerness, Race, in: Cultural Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp.404-417.[11837]

Matebeni, Zethu (2014): Reclaiming Afrikan, Queer perspectives on sexual and gender identities, Modjaj Books, Athlone.[9120]

Matebeni, Zethu (2014): Death and the modern black lesbian, in: Pillay, Devan Khadiagala, Gilbert M. / Naidoo, Prishani / Southall, Roger (eds.): New South African Reviw, 4, Wits University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 183-193.[11684]

Matebeni, Zethu (2012): Feminizing lesbians, Degendering transgender men, A model for building lesbian feminist thinkers and leaders in Africa? in: McGlotten, Shaka / Davis, Dana-Ain (eds.): Black genders and sexualities, Palgrave MacMillan, London, pp. 187-193. [11685]

Matebeni, Zethu / Munro, Surya / Reddy, Vasu (eds.) (2018): Queer in Africa, LGBTQI Identities, Citizenship, and Activism, Routledge, London.[11842]

Mkhize, Nonhlanhla et al. (2010): The country we want to live in, Hate crimes and homophobia in the lives of black lesbian South Africans, HSRC Press, Johannesburg.[9121]

Moodie, Dunbar (1988): Migrancy and male sexuality on the South African gold mines, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 228-256.[9123]

Moodie, Dunbar (2001): Black migrant mine labourers and the vicissitudes of male desire, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 275-286.[9124]

Moothoo-Padyachie, Nitasha (2004): Lesbian violence explored, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 81-86.[9125]

Moran, Leslie J. / Monk, Daniel / Beresford, Sarah (eds.) (1998): Legal queries, Lesbian, gay, and transgender legal studies, Cassell, London/New York.[9126]

Morgan, Ruth / Wieringa, Saskia (eds.) (2005): Tommy boys, Lesbian men and ancestral wives, Female same-sex practices in Africa, Jacana Media, Johannesburg.[9122]

Morgen, Ruth (2003): ‘I’ve got two men and one woman’, Ancestors, sexuality and identity among same-sex identified women traditional healers in South Africa, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 375-391.[9127]

Mosikatsana, Tshepo L. (1996): The definitional exclusion of gays and lesbians from family status, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 549-567.[9128]

Munro, Brenna (2012): South Africa and the dream of love to come, Queer sexuality and the struggle for freedem, University of Minneapolis Press, Minnesota.[9129]

Munro, Brenna (2015): Queer self-fashioning in South Africa, in: Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 168-171. [11752]

Naidu, Evashnee / Mkhize, Nonhlanhla (2005): Gender-based violence, The gay and lesbian experience, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 34-38.[9130]

Nath, D. (2011): `We´l Show You You´re a Woman´, Violence and discrimination against Black lesbians and transgender men in South Africa, Human Rights Watch. New York.[11764]

Nel, Juan / Judge, Melanie (2008): Exploring homophobic victimization, Gauteng, South Africa, Issues, impacts, responses, in: Acta Criminologia, no. 3, pp. 19-36.[9131]

Nkabinde, Nkunzi Zandile (2008): Black bull, Ancestors and me, My life as a lesbian Sangoma, Jacana Media, Cape Town.[9132]

Nkosi, Gugulethu (2007): Indigenous African marriage and same-sex partnerships, Conflicts and controversies, in: International Journal of African Renaissance Studies, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 200-216.[9133]

Oswin, Natalie (2007): Producing homonormativity in neo-liberal South Africa, Recognition, redistribution, and the equality project, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 660-669.[9134]

OUT (2004): HIV and sexually transmitted infections among gay and lesbian people in Gauteng, unpublished report, Pretoria.[9135]

OUT (2004): Suicide among lesbian and gay people in Gauteng, unpublished report, Pretoria.[9136]

OUT (2004): Gay and lesbian people`s experiences of the health care sector in Gauteng, unpublished report, Pretoria.[9137]

OUT (2004): Reporting practices to the police of gay and lesbian people in Gauteng, unpublished report, Pretoria.[9138]

OUT (2004): Hate crimes against gay and lesbian people in Gauteng, unpublished report, Pretoria.[9139]

Potgieter, Cheryl (2006): Masculine bodies, feminine symbols, Challenging gendered identities or compulsory femininity? in: Agenda, no. 67, pp. 116-127.[9140]

Range, Eva (2008): Homosexualität in Südafrika, in: Afrika Süd, 5, pp. 10-12.[9141]

Reddy, Vasu (1998): Negotiating gay masculinities, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 65-70.[9144]

Reddy, Vasu (2009): From social silence to social sience, Same sex sexuality, HIV and AIDS and gender in South Africa, HSRC Publications, Pretoria.[9145]

Reddy, Vasu / Louw, Ronald (2002): Black and gay, Perceptions and interventions around HIV in Durban, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 89-95.[9146]

Reid, G. (2010): Above the sky, Reverend Tsietsi Thandekiso and the founding of an African gay church, UNISA Press, Pretoria.[9142]

Reid, G. (2013): How to be a ‘real gay’, Gay identities in small-town South Africa, University KwaZulu-Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg.[9143]

Reid, Graeme (2006): How to become a ‘real gay’, Identity an terminolgy in Ermelo, Mpumalanga, in: Agenda, no. 67, pp. 137-145. [9147]

Reid, Graeme (2002): `The History of the Past is the Trust of the Present´, Preservation and Excavation in the Gay and Lesbian Archives of South Africa, in: Hamilton, Carolyn et al. (ed.) Refiguring the Archive, Springer, Cham, pp. 193-208.[11746]

Rich, Eileen (2006): Overall research findings on the levels of empowerment among LGBTI people in the Western Cape, South Africa, The Triangle Project, Cape Town.[11797]

Rink, Bradley (2013): Que(e)rying Cape Town, Touring Africa´s `Gay Capital´ with the pink map, in: Sarmento, Joao / Brito-Henriques, Eduardo (eds.): Tourism in the Global South: Landscapes, identities and development, Centre for Geographical Studies, Lisbon, pp. 65-90. [11785]

Rudwick, Stephanie / Nkomo, Khathala / Shange, Magcino (2006): Ulimi Iwenkululeko, Township ‘Women’s language and empowerment’ and homosexual linguistic identities, in: Agenda, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 57-65. [9148]

Salo, Elaine / Ribas, Mario / Lopes, Pedro / Zamboni, Marcio (2010): Living our lives on the edge, Power, space and sexual orientation in Cape Town Townships, South Africa, in: Sexuality Research and Social Policy, vol. 7, pp. 298-309. [11798]

Sanger, Nadia (2013): Safely queer on the urban peripheries of Cape Town: A comparative study exploring how `class´ and space mediate sexual identities for gender non-conforming youth on the urban peripheries of Cape Town in South Africa, Human Science Research Council, Cape Town.[11799]

Sanger, Nadia / Clowes, Lyndsay (2006): Marginalised and demonised, Lesbians and equality - perceptions of people in a local Western Cape community, in: Agenda, Empowering Women for Gender Equity, vol. 67, pp. 36-47.[11800]

Saunders, A.J.G.M. (1997): Homosexuality and the law, Gay revolution in South Africa?, in: Journal of African Law, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 100-108.[9149]

Scott, Lwando (2021): Inxeba (The Wound), Queerness and Xhosa culture, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp. 26-38. [11817]

Singamoney, V. / Epprecht, M. (2013): Meanings of homosexuality, same-sex sexuality, and Africanness in two South African townships, An evidence-based approach for rethinking same-sex prejudice, in: African Studies Review vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 83–107.[11794]

Singh, Divya (1995): Discrimination against lesbians in family law, in: South African Journal on Human Rights, vol.11, no.4, pp. 571-581.[9150]

Sizemore-Barber, April (2020): Prismatic Performances, Queer South Africa and the Fragmentation of the rainbow nation, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.[11731]

Southy, Nicholas (1997): Uncovering homosexuality in colonial South Africa, The case of Bishop Twells, in: South African Historical Journal, no. 36, pp. 48-67.[9151]

Spurlin, William (2007): Imperialisms within the margins, Queer representation and the politics of culture in Southern Africa, Palgrave, New York.[9152]

Steyn, Melissa / van Zyl, Mikki (2005): Performing queer, Shaping sexualities, 1994-2005, vol. One, NB Publishers, Johannesburg/Cape Town.[9153]

Steyn, Melissa / van Zyl, Mikki (2009): The prize and the price, Shaping sexualities in South Africa, HSRC Press, Johannesburg.[9154]

Stychin, Carl (1996): Constituting sexuality, The struggle for sexual orientation in the South African Bill of Rights, in: Journal of Law and Society, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 455-483.[9155]

Swarr, Amanda (2012): Paradoxes of butchness, Lesbian masculinities and sexual violence in contemporary South Africa, in: Signs vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 961-86. [11732]

Swarr, Amanda L. / Nagar, Richa (2004): Dismantling assumptions, Interrogating "lesbian" struggles for identity and survival in India and South Africa, in: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol.29, no.2, pp. 491-516.[9158]

Swarr, Amanda Lock (2004): Moffies, artists, and queens, Race and the production of South African gay male drag, in: Journal of Homosexuality, vol. 46, no. 3-4, pp. 73-89.[9156]

Swarr, Amanda Lock (2012): Sex in transition, Remaking gender and race in South Africa, State University of New York Press, Albany.[9157]

Talmor, Ruti (2013): From the margins you push so that the centre implodes, Queer media in South Africa, in: GLQ, a Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 383-403. [11755]

The Other Foundation (2016): Progressive prudes, A survey of attitudes towards homosexuality and gender non-conformity in South Africa, The Other Foundation, Johannesburg. [11802]

Thoreson, Ryan Richard (2013): Beyond equality: The post-apartheid counternarrative of trans and intersex movements in South Africa, in: African Affairs, vol. 112, no. 449, pp. 646-665.[11844]

Thoreson, Ryan Richard (2008): Somewhere over the rainbow nation, Gay, Lesbian and bi-sexual activism in South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 679-698.[9159]

Tsampiras, Carla (2008): Not so 'gay' after all, Constructing (homo)sexuality in AIDS research in the South African Medical Journal, 1980-1990, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 477-499.[9160]

Ttobie, Cheryl (2003): Somewhere in the double rainbow, Queering the nation in recent South African fiction, in: Current Writing, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 117-137.[9161]

Ttobie, Cheryl (2003): Reading bi-sexuality from the South African perspective, in: Journal of Bisexuality, 3, 1, pp. 33-52.[9162]

Turner, Irina (2008): Comprehending gender issues through photography, A South African case study, Verlag Dr. Müller, Saarbrücken.[9163]

Van Zyl, Mikki (2011): Are same-sex marriages unAfrican? Same-sex relationships and belonging in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Journal of Social Issues, vol. 67, no. 2, pp. 335–357.[11788]

van Zyl, Mikki / de Gruchy, Jeanell / Reid, Graeme et al. (1999): The Aversion Project, Human Rights Abuses of Gays and Lesbians in the South African Defence Force by Health Workers During the Apartheid Era, Cape Town[11832]

Visser, Gustav (2010): Gay men, tourism and urban space, Reflections on Africa´s `gay capital´, in: Tourism Geographies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 168-189. [11781]

Visser, Gustav (2003): Gay men, leisure space and South African cities, The case of Cape Town, in: Geoforum, vol. 34, pp. 113-122.[9164]

Visser, Gustav (2008): Exploratory notes on the geography of black gay leisure spaces in Bloemfontein, South Africa, in: Urban Forum, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 413-423.[9165]

Ward, Kevin (2013): Religious institutions and actors and religious attitudes to homosexual rights, South Africa and Uganda, in: Institute of Commonwealth Studies: Human rights, sexual orientation and gender identity in the Commonwealth, London.[9166]

Wildenboer, Hermi (2000): The status of same-sex unions in South Africa, in: South African Journal of International Affairs, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 54-62.[9167]

Wolhuter, Lorraine (1997): Equality and the concept of difference, Same-sex marriages in the light of the final constitution, in: South African Law Journal, vol. 114, no. 2, pp. 389-411.[9168]

Yarbrough, Michael (2020): A new twist on the ‘un-african’ script, Representing gay and lesbian African weddings in democratic South Africa, in: Africa Today, vol. 67, no. 1, pp. 48-71. [9169]

society - masculinities

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (1997): Men on violence against women, in: Urbanisation and Health Newsletter, no. 34, pp. 13-19.[9306]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (2004): Sexual violence against intimate partners in Cape Town, Prevalence and risk factors reported by men, in: Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, 82, pp. 330-337.[9307]

Abrahmas, Naeema / Jewkes, Rachel (2005): What is the impact of witnessing mother abuse during childhood on South African men’s violence as adults? in: American Journal of Public Health, 95, pp. 1811-1816.[9308]

Albertyn, Catherine / Hassim, Shireen (2003): The boundaries of democracy, Gender, HIV and culture, in: Everatt, D. / Maphai, V. (ed.): The real state of the nation, South Africa after 1990, Johannesburg, pp. 137-164.[9309]

Anderson, Bronwynne (2010): You are not a man if you hit a girl, Coloured high-school boys articulating more peaceable expressions of heterosexual masculinity, in: Agenda, vol. 24, no. 83, pp. 68-81.[11852]

Bank, Leslie (1994): Angry men and working women: Gender, violence and economic change in Qwaqwa in the 1980s, in: African Studies, vol. 53, no. 1, pp. 89-114.[9310]

Beinart, William (1991): The origins of indlavini - Male associations and migrant labour in the Transkei, in: African Studies, vol. 50, no. 1-2, pp. 103-128.[9311]

Beinart, William (1992): Political and collective violence in Southern African historiography, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 455-486.[9312]

Bhana, Deevia (2005): Violence and gendered negotiations of masculinity among young black school boys in South Africa, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 205-220.[9313]

Bonner, Philip (1988): Family, crime and political consciousness on the East Rand, 1939-1955, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 393-420.[9314]

Bonner, Philip (1993): The Russians on the Reef, 1947-1957, Urbanisation, Gang warfare and ethnic mobilisation, in: Bonner, Philip / Delius, Peter / Posel, Deborah (eds.): Apartheid genesis, 1935-1962, Ravan Press / Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 160-194.[9315]

Campbell, Catherine (1992): Learning to kill? Masculinity, the family and violence in Natal, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 614-628.[9316]

Campbell, Catherine (1997): Migrancy, masculine identities and AIDS, The psychological context of HIV transmission on the South African gold mines, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 273-281.[9317]

Campbell, Catherine (2001): ‘Going underground and going after women’, Masculinity and HIV transmission amongst black workers on the gold mines, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 275-286.[9318]

Campbell, Catherine / MacPhail, Catherine (2001): ‘I think condoms are good but, aai, I hate those things’: Condome use among adolescents and young people in a Southern African township, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 52, pp. 1613-1627.[9319]

Campbell, Catherine / MacPhail, Catherine (2002): Peer education, gender and development of critical consciousness, Participatory HIV prevention by South African youth, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 55, pp. 331-345.[9320]

Carton, Benedict (1998): Impotent African patriarchs, unruly African sons in colonial South Africa, in: Aguilar, Mario (ed.): The politics of age and gerontocracy in Africa, Ethnographies of the past and memories of the present, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 31-64.[9321]

Carton, Benedict (2000): Blood from your children, The colonial origins of generational conflict in South Africa, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville.[9322]

Carton, Benedict (2001): Locusts fall from the sky, Manhood and migrancy in Kwa Zulu, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 129-140.[9323]

Carton, Benedict / Morrell, Robert (2006): Kampfsport, stählerne Körper und Mannhaftigkeit in der südafrikanischen Zulukultur, 1800-1930, in: Werkstatt Geschichte, 44, 3, pp. 67-80.[9324]

Clowes, Lindsay (2001): ‘Are you going to be Miss (or Mr) Africa? Contesting masculinity in Drum Magazine, 1951-1953, in: Gender and History, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-20.[9325]

Clowes, Lindsay (2005): To be a man, Changing constructions of manhood in Drum Magazine, 1951-1965, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 289-108.[9326]

Clowes, Lindsay (2008): Masculinity, matrimony and generation, Reconfiguring patriarchy in Drum 1951-1983, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 179-192.[9327]

Conway, Daniel (2005): Masculinity, citizenship and political objection to military service in Apartheid South Africa, in: Gouws, Amanda (ed.): (Un)thinking citizenship, Feminist debates in contemporary South Africa, Ashgate Publishing, Aldershot, pp. 91-116.[9328]

Daphne, Jeremy (1998): A new masculine identity, Gender awareness raising for men, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 24-29.[9329]

Delius, Peter / Glaser, Cliffe (2002): Sexual socialization in South Africa, A historical perspective, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 29-53.[9330]

Donaich, Alex / Peacock, Dean (2006): Masculinities in motion, in: Jones, Adam (ed.): Men of the global South, Zed Books, London.[9331]

Dunkle, K.L. / Jewkes, R.K. et al. (2006): Perpetration of partner violence and HIV risk behaviour of young men in the rural Eastern Cape, in: AIDS, 20, pp. 2017-2024.[9332]

Eagle, Gill (2006): Masculine victims, A contradiction in terms? in: Critical Psychology, International Journal of Critical Psychology, Issue 17: Critical Psychology in Africa, pp. 47-76.[9333]

Epstein, Debbie (1998): Marked men, Whiteness and masculinity, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 49-59.[9334]

Epstein, Debbie (1998): Uncovering masculinity in Southern African History, in: Review of Southern African Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 118-134.[9335]

Epstein, Debbie (2004): Hungochani, The history of a dissident sexuality in Southern Africa, Queens`s University Press, Montreal.[9336]

Erlank, Natasha (2003): Gender and masculinity in South African nationalist discourse, 1912-1950, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 653-671.[9337]

Erlank, Natasha (2003): Gendering commonality, African men and the 1883 Commission on Native Law and Custom, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 937-953.[9338]

Ferguson, H. / Hearn, J. et al. (2004): Ending gender-based violence, A call for global action to involve men, SIDA, Stockholm.[9339]

Gear, S. (2003): Sex, sexual violence and coercion in men’s prison, CSVR, Johannesburg.[9340]

Gear, S. (2005): Rules of engagement, Structuring sex and damage in men’s prisons and beyond, in: Culture, Health and Society, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 195-208.[9341]

Gear, S. (2007): Fear, violence and sexual violence in a Gauteng Juvenile Correction Centre for males, Report, CSVR, Johannesburg.[9342]

GETNET (2001): Masculinities, The making of gendered identities, A GETNET guidebook for trainers, Cape Town.[9343]

GETNET (2003): Men and masculinities conference, Conference Proceedings, Cape Town.[9344]

Ghanotakis, Elena / Bruins, Marianne / Peacock, Dean et al. (2007): Stop prison rape in South Africa, in: Agenda, no. 74, pp. 68-80.[9345]

Glaser, Cliffe (1998): We must infiltrate the Tsotsis, School, politics and youth gangs in Soweto, 1968-1976. In: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 301-324.[9346]

Glaser, Cliffe (1998): Swines, hazels and the dirty dozen, Masculinity, territoriality, and the youth gangs of Soweto, 1960-1976. In: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no.4, pp. 719-736.[9347]

Glaser, Cliffe (2000): Bo-Tsotsi, Youth gangs of Soweto, 1935-1976, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth.[9348]

Goldsmith, Meredith (2002): Of masks, mimicry, misogyny, and miscegeneration, Forging black South African masculinity in Bloke Modisane´s Blame me on history, in: Journal of Men´s Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 291-307.[11829]

Gqola, Pumula Dineo (2007): How the ‘cult of feminity’ and violent masculinities support endemic gender-based violence in South Africa, in: African Identities, 5, 1, pp. 111-124.[9349]

Gqola, Pumula Dineo (2008): Brutal inheritances, Echoes, negrophobia and masculinist violence, in: Hassim, Shireen / Kupe, Tawana / Worby, Eric (eds.): Go home or die here, Violence, xenophobia and the reinvention of difference in South Africa, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 209-222.[9350]

Gqola, Pumula Dineo / Goniwe, T. (2004): A neglected heritage, The aestetics of complex black masculinities, in: Agenda, 63, pp. 80-94.[9351]

Greig, Alan / Peacock, Dean (2005): Men as partners programme, Promising practices guide, Johannesburg.[9352]

Guy, Jeff / Thabane, Motlatsi (1987): The Ma-Rashea, A participant’s perspective, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Class, community and conflict, South African perspectives, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 436-456.[9353]

Harries, Patrick (1990): Symbols and sexuality, Culture and identity on the early Witwatersrand gold mines, in: Gender and History, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 318-336.[9354]

Haupt, Adam (2001): Black thing, Hip hop nationalism, ‘race’ and gender in prophets of da City and Brassie vannie Kap, in: Erasmus, Zimitri (ed.): Coloured by history, shaped by place, New perspectives on Coloured identities in Cape Town, Kwela Books, Cape Town.[9355]

Horowitz, Ira (2002): Cultural practices of masculinty in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Pease, Bob (ed.): A men’s world, Zed Books, London, pp. 231-244.[9356]

Hunter, Marc (2004): Masculinities, multiple sex partners and HIV/AIDS, The Making and unmaking of Isoka in KwaZulu-Natal, in: Transformation, vol. 54, pp. 123-153.[9357]

Ingersoll, Earl (1998): Reconstructing masculinity in the postcolonial world of Bessie Head, in: Ariel, A Review of Internationals English Literature, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 95-116.[9358]

Jensen, Steffen (2008): Gangs, politics and dignity in Cape Town, James Currey Publishers, Oxford. [9359]

Jewkes, R. / Dunkle, K. et al. (2006): Rape perpetration by young rural men, Prevalence, patterns and risk factors, in: Social Science and Medicine, 63, pp. 2949-2961.[9360]

Jewkes, R. / Dunkle, K. et al. (2006): Perpetration of partner violence and HiV risk behaviour among young men in the rural Eeastern Cape, in: AIDS, 20, pp. 2017-2024.[9361]

Jewkes, Rachel / Jama N. et al. (2005): Stepping stone studies, A gender transformative HIV intervention, Medical Research Council, Cape Town/Pretoria.[9362]

Jewkes, Rachel / Jama N. et al. (2007): Evaluation of stepping stones, A gender transformative HIV intervention, Medical Research Council, Cape Town/Pretoria.[9363]

Jones, Adam (ed.) (2006): Men of the global south, A reader, Zed Books, London.[9364]

Kaarsholm, Preben (2005): Moral panic and cultural mobilization, Responses to transition, crime and HIV/AIDS in KwaZulu- Natal, in: Development and Change, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 133-156.[9365]

Kaminer, Debra / Dixon, John (1995): The reproduction of masculinity: A discourse analysis of men’s drinking talk, in: South African Journal of Psychology, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 168-174.[9376]

Kumalo, Bafana (2005): The role of men in the struggle for gender equality, Possibilities for positive engagement, in: Agenda, Special Focus, pp. 88-94.[9366]

Kynoch, Gary (2001): ‘A man among men’: Gender, identity and power in South Africa’s Marashea gangs, in: Gender and History, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 249-272.[9367]

Kynoch, Gary (2005): We are fighting the world, A history of the Marashea gangs in South Africa, 1947-1999, Ohio University Press, Ohio.[9368]

La Hausse, Paul (1990): ‘The cows of Nongoloza’, Youth, crime and Amalaita gangs in Durban, 1900-1936, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 79-111.[9369]

Le Gaetene, Gange (2004): Taking the bull by the horns, Working with young men on HIV/AIDS in South Africa, in: Ruxton, Sandy (ed.): Gender equality and men, Learning from practice, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp.101-112.[9370]

Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne (1997): Infect one, infect all, Zulu youth response to the AIDS epidemic in South Africa, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 17, no. 4, pp.363-380.[9371]

Lemon, Jennifer (1995): Masculinity in crisis, in: Agenda, no. 24, pp. 61-71.[9372]

Lesanje, Desmond (2005): Through men, by men, for men, Christinanity and the quest for equality, in: Agenda, Special Focus, pp. 78-79.[9373]

Lindegaard, Rosenkrantz Marie (2007): Angels, prisons and other human beings, Doing research with boys who have killed, in: Medische Anthropologie, 19, 1, pp. 59-78.[9374]

Luyt, R. / Foster, D. (2001): Hegemonic masculine conceptualisation in a gang culture, in: South African Journal of Psychology, 31, 1, pp. 1-11.[9375]

MacPhail, M. (1994): Challenging dominant norms of masculinities for HIV prevention, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 2, no. 2, pp.141-149.[9377]

Madhavan, Sangeetha / Townsend, Nicolas / Garey, Anita (2008): ‘Absent breadwinners’, Father-child connections and paternal support in rural South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 647-663.[9378]

Mager, Ann (1999): Gender and making of South African Bantustan, A social history of the Ciskei, 1945-1958, James Currey Publishers, London.[9379]

Maharaj, Pranitha (2000): Promoting male involvement in reproductive health, in: Agenda, no. 44, pp. 37-47.[9380]

Maharaj, Pranitha (2001): Male attitudes to family planning in the era of HIV/AIDS, Evidence from KwaZulu/Natal, South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 245-258.[9381]

Makhaye, G. (2005): Young men, in: Karim, Abdool / Karim, Abdool (eds.): HIV/AIDS in South Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge/Cape Town, pp. 313-320.[9382]

Mankayi, Nyameka / Shefer, Tamara (2005): Masculinities, militarisation and unsafe sexual practices, A case study of a young man in the South African military, in: Agenda, 63, pp. 66-78.[9385]

Martens, Jeremy (2001): ‘Almost a public calamity’: Prostitutes, ‘nurseboys’ and attempts to control veneral diseases in colonial Natal, 1886-1890, in: South African Historical Journal, vol. 45, pp. 27-53.[9387]

Martens, Jeremy (2002): Settler homes, manhood and ‘houseboys’: An analysis of Natal’s rape scare of 1886, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 379-400.[9388]

Martens, Jeremy (2003): Polygamy, sexual danger, and the creation of vagrancy legislation in Colonial Natal, in: Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 24-45.[9389]

Mehta, Manisha / Peacock, Dean / Bernal, Lisette (2004): Men as partners, Lessons learned from engaging men in clinics and communities, in: Ruxton, Sandy (ed.): Gender equality and men, Learning from practice, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 89-100.[9383]

Meintjes, F. (1991): Men, feminism and masculinity, in: Agenda, 11, pp. 11-14.[9384]

Moffett, Helen (2001): Men’s roles and responsibilities in ending gender based violence, Entering the labyrinth, Coming to grips with gender war zones, The case of South Africa, INSTRAW Working Paper, no. 5, INSTRAW, New York.[9390]

Moffett, Helen (2006): ‘These women, they force us to rape them’, Rape as a narrative of social control in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 129-144.[9391]

Montgomery, Catherine / Hosegood, Victoria et al. (2006): Men’s involvement in the South African family, Engendering change in the AIDS era, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 62, 10, pp. 2411-2419. [9386]

Moodie, Dunbar (1983): Mine culture and miners’ identity on the South African gold mines, in: Bozzoli, Belinda (ed.): Town and countryside in the Transvaal, Ravan Press, Johannesburg, pp. 176-197.[9392]

Moodie, Dunbar (1988): Migrancy and male sexuality on the South African gold mines, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 228-256.[9393]

Moodie, Dunbar (2001): Black migrant mine labourers and the vicissitudes of male desire, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 275-286.[9394]

Moodie, Dunbar (2005): Maximum average violence, Underground assaults on the South African gold mines, 1913-1950, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 31, no. 1.[9395]

Moolman, Benita (2004): The reproduction of an ‘ideal’ masculinity through gang rape on the Cape Flats, Understanding some issues and challenges for effective redress, in: Agenda, 60, pp. 109-123.[9396]

Morrell, R. / Posel, D. / Devey, R. (2003): Counting fathers in South Africa, Issues of definition, methodology and policy, in: Social Dynamics, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 73-94.[9411]

Morrell, Robert (1994): Boys, gangs, and the making of masculinity in the white secondary schools of Natal, 1880-1930, in: Masculinities, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 56-82.[9397]

Morrell, Robert (1996): Forging a ruling race: Rugby and white masculinity in colonial Natal, c.1870-1910, in: Nauright, John / Chandler, Timothy (eds.): Making men, Rugby and masculine identity, Frank Cass Publications, London, pp. 91-120.[9398]

Morrell, Robert (1997): Masculinity in South African History, in: South African Historical Journal, no. 37, pp. 167-177.[9399]

Morrell, Robert (1998): The new man?, in: Agenda, no. 37, pp. 7-12.[9400]

Morrell, Robert (1998): Of boys and men, Masculinity and gender in Southern African Studies, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 605-630.[9401]

Morrell, Robert (2001): The times of change, Men and masculinity in South Africa, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 3-40. (and in: Böll, Verena / Günther, Ursula et al. (Hg.): Umbruch – Bewältigung – Geschlecht, Genderstudien zu afrikanischen Gesellschaften in Afrika und Deutschland, Waxmann Verlag, Münster, 2003, pp. 43-58).[9402]

Morrell, Robert (2001): Corporal punishment and masculinity in South African schools, in: Men and Masculinties, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 140-157.[9403]

Morrell, Robert (2002): Men, movements and gender transformation in South Africa, in: Journal of Men’s Studies, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 309-327.[9404]

Morrell, Robert (2005): Men, movements and gender transformation in South Africa, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 271-288.[9405]

Morrell, Robert (2020): Making of masculinity studies in South Africa, in: Boyhood Studies, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 117-128. [9406]

Morrell, Robert (ed.) (2001): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London.[9410]

Morrell, Robert / Richter, Linda (2004): The fatherhood project, Confronting issues of masculinity and sexuality, in: Agenda, no. 62, pp. 36-44.[9407]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2001): HIV/AIDS policies, schools and gender identities, in: Indicator South Africa, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 51-57.[9408]

Morrell, Robert / Unterhalter, Elaine et al. (2002): The school setting, Opportunities for integrating gender equality and HIV risk reduction interventions, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 11-21.[9409]

Naidu, Evashnee / Mkhize, Nonhlanhla (2005): Gender-based violence, The gay and lesbian experience, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp.34-38.[9412]

Ndlazi, Thulani (2004): Men in church institutions and religious organisations, The role of Christian men in transforming gender relations and ensuring gender equality, in: Agenda, no. 61, pp. 62-65.[9413]

Niehaus, Isak (2002): Renegotiating masculinity in the South African lowveld, Narratives of male-male sex in labour compounds and in prison, in: African Studies, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 77-97.[9414]

Niehaus, Isak (2005): Dr. Wouter Basson, Americans, and the wild beasts, Men’s conspiracy theories of HIV/AIDS in the South African lowveld, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 24, pp. 179-208.[9415]

Olsen, Kathryn (2001): ‘Mina ngizokushaya ngengoma’ ‘I will change you with a song’, Constructions of masculinity in maskanda, in: Agenda, no. 49, pp. 51-60.[9416]

Palitza, Kristin (2008): ‚I have two healthy hands’, A group of men in the Eastern Cape overcame gender stereotypes and cares for the sick and disadvantaged, Sonke Gender Justice Network, Cape Town.[9417]

Peacock, Dean (2003): Building on a legacy of social justice activism, Enlisting men as gender justice activists in South Africa, in: Journal of Men and Masculinities, 5, pp. 327-330.[9418]

Peacock, Dean (2003): Men as partners, Promoting men’s involvement in care and support activities for people living with HIV/AIDS, UN/ILO/UNAIDS, Expert group meeting on ‘The role of men and boys in achiving gender equality, 21-24 Oct 2004, Brasilia, Brasil, EGM/Men-Boys-EP/2003/EP.5, UN/ILO/UNDP/UNAIDS, New York.[9419]

Peacock, Dean (2005): Urgency and optimism, Masculinities, gender equality and public health, in: Agenda, special focus, pp. 146-153.[9420]

Peacock, Dean (2006): We exist, Voices of male feminism, in: Wilson, Shamillah / Sengupta, Anasuys / Evans, Kristy (eds.): Defending our dreams, Global feminist voices for a new generation, Zed Books, London. [9421]

Peacock, Dean (2007): Work with men, in: Flood, Michael / Gardiner, Judith Kegan et al. (eds.). International Encylopedia of men and masculinities, Routledge, London.[9422]

Peacock, Dean (2008): Strategies for increasing men’s involevement in the care economy, presentation, CSW/UN, New York.[9423]

Peacock, Dean / Botha, Mbuyiselo (2006): The new gender platforms and fatherhood, in: Richter, Linda / Morrell, Robert (eds.): Baba, Men and fatherhood in South Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria, pp. 281-292.[9424]

Peacock, Dean / Kumalo, Bafana / McNab, Eleanor (2006): Men and gender activism in South Africa, Observations, critique and recommendations for the future, in: Agenda, 69, pp. 71-81.[9425]

Peacock, Dean / Redpath, J. et al. (2007): Official South African country report, Progress on commitments made at the 2004 United Nations Commission on the Status of Women on implementing recommendations at involving men and boys in achieving gender equality, Office of the Status of Women, Government of South Africa / Commission on the Status of Women, Pretoria/Cape Town/New York.[9426]

Peacock, Dean / Weston, Mark (2008): Men and care economy in the context of HIV and AIDS, Structure, political will and greatter male involvement, Paper prepared for the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women expert group meeting on “Equal sharing of responsibilities between men and women, inluding care-giving in the context of HIV/AISD, 6-9 October, 2008, EGM/ESOR/2008/EP.1, DAW/DESA, UN, Geneva/New York.[9427]

Posel, Deborah (2005): The scandal of manhood, `Baby rape´ and the politicization of sexual violence in post-apartheid South Africa, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 239–252. [11850]

Ramphele, Mamphela (2000): Teach me how to be a man, An exploration of the definition of masculinity, in: Das, V. et al. (eds.): Violence and subjectivity, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 102-119.[9428]

Ratele, Kopano (2010): Watch your man, Young black males at risk of homicidal violence, in: SA Crime Quarterly, vol. 33, pp. 19–24.[11792]

Ratele, Kopano (2002): Contradictions in the construction of masculinity, in: News from the Nordic Africa Institute, 2, S, pp. 2-5.[9429]

Ratele, Kopano (2006): Ruling masculinity and sexuality, Jacob Zuma and ‘a better life for all’, in: Feminist Africa, 6.[9430]

Ratele, Kopano (2008): Liberating masculinities, HSRC Press, Pretoria.[9431]

Reid, Graeme / Walker, Liz (eds.) (2005): Men behaving differently, South African men since 1994, Double Story Books, Cape Town.[9432]

Richter, Linda / Morrell, Robert (eds.) (2006): Baba, Men and fatherhood in South Africa, Human Science Research Publications, Pretoria.[9433]

Salo, Elaine (2003): Negotiating gender and personhood in the new South Africa, Adolescent women and gangsters in Manenberg township, Cape Flats, in: European Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 345-365.[9434]

Salo, Elaine (2006): Mans is ma soe, Ganging practices in Manenberg, South Africa, and the ideologies of masculinities, gender and generational relations, in: Bay, Edna / Donham, Donald (eds.): States of violence, Politics, youth and memory in contemporary Africa, University of Virginia Press, Chalottesville, pp. 148-178.[9435]

Samuelson, Meg (2007): The disfigured body of the female guerrilla: (De)militarization, sexual violence, and redomestication in Zoe Wicomb’s David story, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 833-854.[9436]

Sathiparsad, Reshma (2005): ‘It is better to beat her’, Male youth in KwaZulu Natal speak on violence in relationships, in: Agenda, no. 66, pp. 79-88.[9437]

Sathiparsad, Reshma (2006): Disease comes from girls, Perspectives of male learners in rural Kwa Zulu Natal, on HIV infection and AIDS, in: Journal of Education, no. 38, pp.117-137.[9438]

Sawires, Sharif / Dworkin, Shari et al. (2007): Male circumcision and HIV/AIDS, Challenges and opportunities, in: The Lancet, vol. 369, pp. 708-713.[9439]

Shefer, T. / Ratele, K. / Strebel, A. et al. (eds.) (2007): From boys to men, Masculinities at risk, UCT Press, Cape Town.[9442]

Shefer, T. / Ratele, K. et al. (2005): Masculinities in South Africa, A critical review of contemporary literature on men’s sexuality, in: Gibson, D. / Hardon, A. (eds.): Rethinking masculinities, violence and AIDS, Het Spinhuis, Amsterdam, pp. 73-86.[9441]

Shefer, T. / Ruiters, K. (1998): The masculine construct of the heterosex, in: Agenda, 27, pp. 39-45.[9440]

Sideris, Tina (2001): Rape in war and peace - Social context, gender power and identity, in: Meintjes, Sheila / Pillay, Anu / Trushen, Meredeth (eds.): The aftermath, Women in post-conflict transformation, Zed Books, London, pp. 142-158.[9443]

Sideris, Tina (2002): Non-violent men in violent communities, Negotiating the head and the neck, unpublished paper, WISER, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg.[9444]

Sideris, Tina (2004): Men, identity and power, A case study of the re-invention of ‘tradition’, Implications for involving men in training and education about gender, in: Agenda, no. 60, pp. 88-93.[9445]

Sideris, Tina (2004): “You have to change and you don’t know how!”, Contesting what it means to be a man in a rural area of South Africa, in: African Studies, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 29-49.[9446]

Sideris, Tina (2007): Post-apartheid South Africa, Gender, rights and the politics of recognition, New avenues for old forms of violence, in: Buur, Lars / Jensen, Steffen / Stepputat, Finn (eds.): The security development nexus, Expressions of sovereignty and securitization in Southern Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute/HSRC Press, Uppsala/Cape Town, pp. 233-250.[9447]

Sonke Gender Justice Network (2008): Men for change, Health for all, Men, health and gender equality, A policy discussion paper, prepared for the National Department of Health, Cape Town. [9448]

Sonke Gender Justice Network (2009): Report on the impact of Sonke Gender Justice Network “One man can” campaign in Limpopo, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal Provinces, South Africa, Sonke, Cape Town. [9449]

Suttner, Raymond (2005): Masculinities in the African National Congress-led liberation movement, The underground period, in: Kleio, African Historical Review, vol. 37, issue 1, pp. 71-106.[9450]

Thorpe, Mark (2002): Masculinity in an HIV intervention, in: Agenda, no. 53, pp. 61-68.[9451]

Unterhalter, Elaine (2000): The work of the nation, Heroic masculinity in South African autobiographical writing of the Anti-Apartheid struggle, in: Journal of Development Research, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 157-178.[9452]

Vahed, Goolam (2005): Indentured masculinity in colonial Natal, 1860-1910, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.)African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 239-256.[9453]

Vincent, Louise (2006): Destined to come to blow, Race and constructions of ‘rational intellectual’ masculinity ten years after apartheid, in: Men and Masculinities, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 350-366.[9454]

Vincent, Louise (2008): Cutting tradition, The political regulation of traditional circumcision rites in South Africa’s liberal democratic order, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 77-91.[9455]

Viney, Ron (1999): A history of masculinities in South Africa: Context and parametres, in: New Contree, no. 45, pp. 85-97.[9456]

Waetjen, Thembisa (2004): Masculinity and the struggle for nation in South Africa, University of Illinois Press, Urbana.[9460]

Waetjen, Thembisa / Maré, Gerhard (1999): Workers and warriors, Inkatha’s politics of masculinity in the 1980s, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 197-216.[9457]

Waetjen, Thembisa / Maré, Gerhard (1999): A home in the homeland, Gender, national space and Inkatha’s politics of ethnicity, in: Ethnic and Racial Studies, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 653-678.[9458]

Waetjen, Thembisa / Maré, Gerhard (2001): ’Men amongst men’, Masculinity and Zulu nationalism in the 1980s, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 195-208.[9459]

Walker, L. (2005): Men behaving differently, South African men since 1994, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 225-238.[9461]

Walsh, S. / Mitchell, C. / Smith, A. (2002): The soft cover project, Youth participation in HIV/AIDS interventions, in: Agenda, vol. 53, pp. 106-112.[9462]

society - migration and urbanisation

Bank, Leslie (1999): Men with cookers, Transformation in migrant culture, domesticity and identity in Duncan Village, East London, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 393-416.[9737]

Bank, Leslie (2001): Living together, moving apart: Home made agendas, Identity politics and urban-rural linkages in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, in: Journal of Contemporary African Studies, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 129-148.[9738]

Beinart, William (1991): The origins of indlavini - Male associations and migrant labour in the Transkei, in: African Studies, vol. 50, no. 1-2, pp. 103-128.[9739]

Bolt, Maxim (2010): Cameraderie and its discontent, Class consciousness, ethnicity and divergent masculinities among Zimbabwean migrants in Johannesburg, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 377-393.[9740]

Bonner, Philip (1990): Desirable or undesirable Sotho women? Liquor, prostitution and the migration of Sotho women to the Rand, 1920-1945, in: Walker, Cheryll (ed.): Women and gender in Southern Africa to 1945, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 221-250.[9741]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1985): Migrant women and South African social change, Biographical approaches to social analysis, in: African Studies, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 87-96.[9742]

Bozzoli, Belinda (1991): Women of Phokeng - Consciousness, life strategy, and migrancy in South Africa, 1900-1983, Heinemann Publishers, New York.[9743]

Buijs, Gina (1993): Women alone, Migrant women from Transkei employed in rural Natal, in: Buijs, G. (ed.): Migrant women, Crossing boundaries, changing identities, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 174-194.[9744]

Cockerton, C.M. (1997): Documenting the exodus: The dimensions and local causes of Bechuanaland women’s migration to South Africa, 1920-1966, in: The South African Geographical Journal, vol. 79, no. 1, pp. 43-51.[9745]

Crush, Jonathan /IDASA (2008): Gender, migration and remittances in Southern Africa, Institute for a Democratic Development in Southern Africa (IDASA), Cape Town.[9746]

Dodson, Belinda (2000): Women on the move, Gender and cross-border migration to South Africa from Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, in: McDonald, David (ed.): On borders, Perspectives on international migration in Southern Africa, St. Martin’s Press, New York, pp. 119-150.[9747]

Dodson, Belinda (2000): Porous borders: Gender and migration in Southern Africa, in: South African Geographical Journal, vol. 82, no. 1, pp. 40-46.[9748]

Dodson, Belinda (2001): Migration by default, Gender concerns in migration policy, in: Africa Today, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 73-89.[9749]

Dodson, Belinda (2001): Discrimination by default? Gender concerns in South African migration policy, in: Africa Today, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 73-89.[9750]

Dodson, Belinda (2002): Gender and brain drain from South Africa, Southern African Migration Project, Migration Policy Series, no. 23, IDASA, Cape Town.[9751]

Dodson, Belinda (2002): Women in the brain drain, Gender and skilled migration from South Africa, in: McDonald, David A. / Crush, Jonathan (eds.): Destinations unknown, Perspectives on the brain drain in Southern Africa. Africa Institute of South Africa, Pretoria, pp. 47-72.[9752]

Dodson, Belinda / Crush, Jonathan (2004): A report on gender discrimination in South Africa's 2002 Immigration Act, Masculinizing the immigrant, in: Feminst Review, no. 77, pp. 96-119.[9753]

Dodson, Belinda / Simelane, Hamilton et al. (2008): Gender, migration and remittances in Southern Africa, Migration Policy Series, no. 49, Southern African Migration Project, IDASA, Cape Town.[9754]

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James, Deborah (1994): Basadi ba baeng/The women are visiting: Female migrant performance from the Northern Transvaal, in: Gunner, Liz (ed.): Politics and performance in Southern Africa, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg, pp. 81-110.[9756]

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James, Deborah (1999): Songs of the women migrants, Performance and identity in South Africa, Witwatersrand University Press, Johannesburg.[9758]

Jochelson, Karen (1995): Women, migrancy and morality - A problem of perspective, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 21, no.2, pp. 323-332.[9759]

Klaaren, Jonathan (2005): Southern Africa: As seen through sexuality, mobility and citizenship, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 168-183.[9760]

Lefko-Everett, Kate (2007): Voices from the margins, Migrant women’s experiences in Southern Africa, Southern Africa Migration Project, Migration Policy Series, no. 46, IDASA, Cape Town.[9761]

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Mager, Anne Kelk (2001): Migrancy, marriage and family in the Ciskei reserve of South Africa, 1945-1959, in: Sharpe, Pamela (ed.): Women, gender and labour migration, Historical and global perspectives, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 259-274.[9763]

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Miranda, Miles (1993): Missing women, Reflections on the experiences of Swazi migrant women on the Rand, 1920-1970, in: Geo Journal, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 85-91.[9765]

Moodie, Dunbar (1988): Migrancy and male sexuality on the South African gold mines, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 14, no. 2, pp. 228-256.[9766]

Moodie, Dunbar (1992): Town women and country wives, Migrant labour, family politics and housing preferences at Vaal Reef mine, in: Labour, Capital and Society, vol. 25, no. 1, pp. 116-132.[9767]

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Moodie, Dunbar (2001): Black migrant mine labourers and the vicissitudes of male desire, in: Morrell, Robert (ed.): Changing men in Southern Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 275-286.[9769]

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Sibisi, Harriet (1977): How African women cope with migrant labour in South Africa, in: Signs, Journal of Culture and Society, vol. 3, pp. 167-177.[9781]

Simkins, Charles / van Heyningen, Elizabeth (1989): Fertility, morality and migration in the Cape Colony, 1891-1904, in: The International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 22, no. 1, 1989, pp. 96-97. [9782]

Sinclair, Marion Ryan (1998): Community, identity and gender in migrant societies in Southern Africa, in: International Affairs, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. 339-353.[9783]

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Swaisland, Cecillie (1993): Female migration and social mobility, British female domestic servants to South Africa, 1860-1914, in: Buijs, Gina (ed.): Migrant women, Crossing boundaries and changing identities, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 161-177.[9787]

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society - women's organisations

Bahre, Erik (2007): Money and violence, Financial self-help groups in a South African township, Brill Publishers, Leiden.[10078]

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Dick, Archie L. (2004): Building a nation of readers? Women's organizations and the politics of reading in South Africa, 1900-1914, in: Historia, vol. 49, no. 2, pp. 23-44.[10086]

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