Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Sierra Leone

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Bah, Osman (1988): Women and water supply in rural Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Rural Development, vol. 11, pp.97-109.[897]

Beoku-Betts, Josephine (1990): Agricultural development in Sierra Leone: Implications for rural women in the aftermath of the women’s decade, in: Africa Today, 1, pp.19-35.[898]

Gboku, Mathew (1999): Farm technology, women’s participation and resource control in Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Extension Systems, no. 1, pp.3-15.[899]

Kroma, Margaret (2002): The gender division of labour in rice post-harvest processing in Sierra Leone, Implications for extension and technology development, in: Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, vol. 8, no. 4, pp.181-194.[900]

Lahai, Bernadette (1994): An evaluation of the level of female participation in cassava and sweet potato on-farm trials and demonstrations in Sierra Leone, in: Acta Horticulturae, 380, pp.55-61.[901]

Leach, Melissa (1991): Locating gender experience, An anthropological view from Sierra Leone, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies (IDS-Bulletin), vol. 22, no. 3, pp.44-49.[902]

Leach, Melissa (1992): Women’s use of forest resources for food security and income generation, Sierra Leone, in: Rodda, Annabel (ed.): Women and the environment, Zed Books, London, pp.124-129.[903]

Leach, Melissa (1992): Women’s crops in women’s spaces - Gender relations in Mende rice farming, in: Croll, Elisabeth / Parkin, David (eds.): Bush base: forest farm, Culture, environment and development, Routledge Publishers, London, pp.76-96.[904]

Leach, Melissa (1992): Gender and environment, Traps and opportunities, in: Development in Practice, vol. 2, no. 1, pp.12-22.[905]

Leach, Melissa (1994): Rainforest relations, Gender and resource use among the Mende of Gola, Sierra Leone, Edinburgh University Press, London.[906]

Lisk, Franklyn / Stevens, Yvette (1987): Government policy and rural women’s work in Sierra Leone, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa, James Currey Publishers, London, pp.182-202.[907]

MacCormack, Carol (1982): Control of land, labour and capital in rural Sierra Leone, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.35-53.[908]

MacCormack, Carol (1982): Health, fertility and birth in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, in: MacCormack, Carol (ed.): Ethnography of fertility and birth, Academic Press, London, pp.115-139.[909]

Safilios-Rothschild, Constantina (1985): The persistence of women's invisibility in agriculture: Theoretical and policy lessons from Lesotho and Sierra Leone, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.299-317.[910]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Geschlechteraspekte der Wissenssysteme und Wissenskommunikation in westafrikanischen Agrarkulturen, in: Honerla, Susan / Schröder, Peter (Hg.): Lokales Wissen und Entwicklung, Zur Relevanz kulturspezifischen Wissens für Entwicklungsprozesse, Verlag für Entwicklungspolitik, Saarbrücken, pp.279-293.[911]

Schäfer, Rita (2002): Hausgärten und Gartengruppen von Frauen in Zimbabwe und Sierra Leone, in: Meyer-Renschhausen, Elizabeth / Müller, Renate / Becker, Petra (Hg.): Die Gärten der Frauen, Zur sozialen Bedeutung von Kleinstlandwirtschaft in Stadt und Land weltweit, Centaurus Verlag, Herbolzheim, pp.99-110.[912]

Stevens, Yvette (1984): Technology for rural women’s activities, Problems and perspectives in Sierra Leone, in: ILO (ed.): Rural development and women in Africa, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp.79-98.[913]

Stevens, Yvette (1985): Improved technologies for rural women: Problems and prospects from Sierra Leone, in: Ahmed, Iftikhar (ed.): Technology and rural women: Conceptual and empirical issues, George and Allen Publishers, London, pp.284-326.[914]

arts and culture

Boone, Sylvia Ardyn (1986): Radiance from the waters, Ideals of feminine beauty in Mende art, Yale University Press, New Haven.[1553]

MacCormack, Carol (1979): Sande, The public face of a secret society, in. Jules-Rosette, B. (ed.): New religions of Africa, Ablex Publishers, Norwood, pp. 27-37.[1554]

MacCormack, Carol (1980): Art and symbolism in Thoma ritual among the Sherbro, Sierra Leone, in: Ethnologische Zeitschrift Zürich, 1, pp. 151-161.[1555]

Phillips, Ruth (1978): Masking in Mende society initiation ritual, in: Africa, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 265-277.[1556]

Phillips, Ruth (1980): The iconography of the Mende Sowei mask, in: Ethnologische Zeitschrift Zürich, 1, pp. 113-132.[1557]

Richards, J.V.O. (1974): The Sande mask, in: African Arts, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 48-51.[1558]

Schäfer, Rita (1990): Die Sande-Frauengeheimgesellschaft der Mende in Sierra Leone. Ihre Organisation und Masken im zeitlichen, intra- und interethnischen Vergleich, Mundus Reihe Ethnologie, Bd. 36, Holos Verlag, Bonn.[1559]

Siegmann, William (2000): Women's hair and Sowei masks in Southern Sierra Leone and Western Liberia, in: Sieber, Roy / Herreman, Frank (eds.): Hair in African art and culture, Museum of African Art. New York.[1560]

economy - formal and informal employment

Ibrahim, Aisha Fofona / Rutherford, Blair / Buss, Doris (2020): Gendered “choices” in Sierra Leone, Women in artisanal mining in Tonkolili District, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 157-176.[11644]

economy - Households

Bledsoe, Caroline (1995): Marginal members, Children of previous unioins in Mende households in Sierra Leone, in: Grennhalgh, S. (ed.): Situating fertility, Anthropological and demographic inquiry, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 130-153.[2002]

Steady, Filomina Chioma (1987): Polygamy and the household economy in a fishing village in Sierra Leone, in: Parkin, David /Nyamwaya, David (eds.): Transformation of African marriage, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp. 211-230.[2003]

economy - markets and traders

White, Frances E. (1987): Sierra Leone’s settler women traders, Women on the Afri-European Frontier, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.[2208]

economy - pastoralism

no entries to this combination of country and topic

education schooling and tertiary education

Beoku-Betts, Josephine (2008): African women scientists and the politics of location: The case of four Sierra Leonean women scientists, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 343-366.[2794]

Beoku-Betts, Josephine / Day, Lynda (2014): Anatomy of an evolving movement, the women’s peace movement and politcal activism in Sierra Leone since the 1990s, in: Jenda, vol. 25.[2795]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1988): The politics of polygyny in Mende education and child forsterage transactions, in: Miller, B.D. (ed.): Gender hierarchies, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[2791]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): School girls and school fees among the Mende in Sierra Leone, in: Sanday, P. / Goodenough, R. (eds.): Beyond the second sex, University of Pennesylvania Press, Philadelphia, pp. 283-290.[2792]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): School fees and the marriage process for Mende girls in Sierra Leone, in: Sanday, Peggy / Goodenough, Ruth (eds.): Beyond the second sex, New directions ni the anthropology of gender, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelophia, pp. 283-309.[2793]

Elbers, Doris (1982): Bildungsprogramme und Bildungschancen für Mädchen und Frauen in Ländern der Dritten Welt - Das Beispiel Sierra Leone, in: Peripherie, 7, pp. 88-99.[2796]

Faye Rousseau, Ida (1975): African Women: Identity Crisis? Some Observations on Education and the Changing Role of Women in Sierra Leone and Zaire, in: Rohrlich Leavitt, R. (ed.): Women Cross Culturally, Change and Challenge, The Hague/Paris pp. 42-51.[2797]

Gage, Anastasia / Bledsoe, Caroline (1994): The effects of education and social stratification on marriage and the transition to parenthood in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 148-164.[2798]

Ketkar, S.L. (1978): Female education and fertility, Some evidence from Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 23-33.[2799]

Little, Kenneth (1966): Attitudes of marriage and the family among educated young Sierra Leonians, in: Lloyd, P.C. (ed.): The new elites of tropical Africa, Oxford University Press, London, pp. 139-162.[2800]

Menzel, Anne (2019): “Without education you can never become president”, Teenage pregnancy and pseudo-empowerment in Sierra-Leone, in: Journal of Intervention and State Building, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 440-458.[11667]

Ojukutu-Macauley, Sylvia (2002): British colonial policy toward education and the roots of gender inequality in Sierra Leone, 1896-1961, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline Rae (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americans, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 3-16.[2801]

health - fgc fgm

Ahmadu, Fuambai (2000): Rites and wrongs, An insider/outsider reflects on power and excision, in: Shell-Duncan, Bettina / Hernlund, Ylva (eds.): Female circumcision in Africa, Culture, controversy, and change, Lynne Rienner, Boulder, pp. 283-312.[3181]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1984): The political use of Sande ideology an symbolism, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 11, pp. 455-472.[3182]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): The politics of children: Fosterage and the social management of fertility among the Mende in Sierra Leone, in: Handwerker, P. (ed.): Birth and power - social change and the politics of reproduction, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 81-100.[3183]

Boone, Sylvia Ardyn (1986): Radiance from the waters, Ideals of feminine beauty in Mende art, Yale University Press, New Haven.[3184]

D’Azvedo, W.L. (1980): Gola Poro and Sande, Primal task in social custodianship, in: Ethnologische Zeitschrift Zürich, 1, pp. 13-24.[3185]

Gage, A.J. / Bledsoe, C. (1994): The effects of education and social stratification on marriage and the transition to parenthood in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, G. (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives, Claredon Press, Oxford.[3186]

Hoffer, Carol (1975): Bundu, Political implications of female solidarity in a secret society, in: Raphael, D. (ed.): Being female, Reproduction, power and change, Mouton, The Hague, pp. 155-173.[3187]

Jambai, A, Mac Cormack, C. (1996): Maternal health, war and religious tradition: Autorative knowledge in Pujehun district, Sierra Leone, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 10, 2, pp. 270-286.[3188]

Ketkar, S.L. (1978): Female education and fertility, Some evidence from Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 23-33.[3189]

Koso-Thomas, O. (1987): The circumcision of women, A strategy for eradiction, Zed Books, London.[3190]

Leopold, R. S. (1983): The shaping of men and the making of metaphors, The meaning of white clay in Poro and Sande initiation society rituals, in: Anthropology, vol 7, no. 2, pp. 21-42.[3191]

MacCormack, Carol (1979): Sande, The public face of a secret society, in. Jules-Rosette, B. (ed.): New religions of Africa, Ablex Publishers, Norwood, pp. 27-37.[3192]

MacCormack, Carol (1980): Proto social to adult, A Sherbro transformation, in: MacCormack, Carol / Strathern, Marilyn (eds.): Nature, culture and gender, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 1-24.[3193]

MacCormack, Carol (1997): Health, fertility and birth in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.) Power, reproduction and gender: Intergenerational transfer of knowledge, Zed Books, London, pp. 75-114. (and in: MacCormack, Carol (ed.): Ethnography of fertility and birth, Academic Press, London, 1982, pp. 115-139.).[3194]

Phillips, Ruth (1978): Masking in Mende society initiation ritual, in: Africa, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 265-277.[3195]

Phillips, Ruth (1980): The iconography of the Mende Sowei mask, in: Ethnologische Zeitschrift Zürich, 1, pp. 113-132.[3196]

Richards, J.V.O. (1974): The Sande, A socio-cultural organisation in the Mende community in Sierra Leone, in: Baessler Archiv, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 265-281.[3197]

Schäfer, Rita (1990): Die Sande-Frauengeheimgesellschaft der Mende in Sierra Leone. Ihre Organisation und Masken im zeitlichen, intra- und interethnischen Vergleich, Mundus Reihe Ethnologie, Bd. 36, Holos Verlag, Bonn.[3198]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit - Traditionelle und moderne afrikanische Frauenzusammenschlüsse im interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler.[3199]

World Health Organisation (WHO) (2005): Fighting genital mutilation in Sierra Leone, in: Bulletin of the World Health Organisation, vol. 83, no. 11, pp. 806-807.[3200]

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Adegbola, O. B. et al. (1995): Sexual networking in Freetown against the background of the AIDS epidemic, in: Health Transition Review (Supplement), 5, pp. 81-112.[3701]

Larsen, Mandi / Casey, Sara et al. (2004): Changes in HIV/AIDS/STI knowledge, attitudes and practices among commercial sex workers and military forces in Port Loko, Sierra Leone, in: Disasters, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 239-254.[3702]

health - reproduction and fertility

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): The politics of children, Fosterage and social management of fertility among the Mende in Sierra Leone, in: Handwerker, Penn (ed.): Birth and power, Social change of reproduction, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 82-100.[4793]

Dorjahn, V.K. (1958): Fertility, polygyny and their interrelation in Temne society, in: American Anthropologist, 60, pp. 838-859.[4794]

Dzegede, S.A. (1981): Urbanization and fertility decline in West Africa, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Liberia, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 12, pp. 232-244.[4795]

Gage, Anastasia / Bledsoe, Caroline (1994): The effects of education and social stratification on marriage and the transition to parenthood in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 148-164.[4796]

Issac, Barry (1980): Female fertility and marital form among the Mende of Rural Upper Bambara Chiefdom, Sierra Leone, in: Ethnology, pp. 297-313.[4797]

Ketkar, S.L. (1978): Female education and fertility, Some evidence from Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 23-33.[4798]

MacCormack, Carol (1997): Health, fertility and birth in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.) Power, reproduction and gender: Intergenerational transfer of knowledge, Zed Books, London, pp. 75-114.(zuvor erschienen in: MacCormack, Carol (ed.): Ethnography of fertility and birth, Academic Press, London, 1982, pp.115-139.).[4799]

health

Jambai, A, Mac Cormack, C. (1996): Maternal health, war and religious tradition: Autorative knowledge in Pujehun district, Sierra Leone, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 10, 2, pp. 270-286.[5063]

MacCormack, Carol (1997): Health, fertility and birth in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.) Power, reproduction and gender: Intergenerational transfer of knowledge, Zed Books, London, pp. 75-114.[5064]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Abraham, A. (1974): Women chiefs in southern Sierra Leone, A rejoinder, in: Africana Research Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 75-81.[5465]

Day, Linda (1994): The evolution of female chiefship during the late 19th century wars of the Mende, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 481-503.[5466]

Denzer, La Ray (1987): Women in Freetown politics, 1914-1961, A preliminary study, in: Africa, 57, pp. 438-456.[5467]

Hoffer, Carol (1972): Mende and Sherbro women in high office, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 151-164.[5468]

Hoffer, Carol (1974): Madame Yoko, Ruler of the Kpa Mende confederacy, in: Rosaldo, M.Z. / Lamphere, Louise (eds.): Women in culture and society, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 173-188.[5469]

Lucan, Talabi Aisie (2004): The life and times of paramount Mende chief Madame Ella Koblo Glulma, Pen Point Publishers, Freetown.[5470]

MacCormack, Carol (1972): Mende and Sherbro women in high office, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 6, pp. 151-164.[5471]

MacCormack, Carol (1975): Sande women and political power in Sierra Leone, in: West African Journal of Sociology and Political Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 42-50.[5472]

MacCormack, Carol (1983): Slaves, slave owners, and slave dealers, The Sherbro Coast and hinterland, in: Robertson, Claire / Klein, Martin (eds.): Women and slavery in Africa, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 271-294.[5473]

Ojukutu-Macauley, Sylvia (2002): British colonial policy toward education and the roots of gender inequality in Sierra Leone, 1896-1961, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline Rae (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americans, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 3-16.[5474]

Philipps, Richard (2005): Heterogynous imperialism and the regulation of sexuality in British West Africa, in: Journal of the History of Sexuality, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 291-315.[5475]

White, Frances E. (1987): Sierra Leone’s settler women traders, Women onthe Afri-European Frontier, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor.[5476]

Literature

no entries to this combination of country and topic

media

African Training and Research Centre for Women (ECA) (1985): Women and the mass media in Africa: case studies of Sierra Leone, the Niger and Egypt / in: Women and development in Africa Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, 15, pp. 198-221[6562]

Wambui, Mercy (2005): Development through radio, A case study of Sierra Leone, in: Crummings, Sarah / van Dam, Henk / Valk, Minke (eds.): Gender and ICT for development, A global sourcebook, Publications of the Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam, pp. 51-60.[6563]

politics - wars violent conflicts

Aning, E.K. (1998): Gender and civil war, The cases of Sierra Leone and Liberia, in: Civil Wars, 1, 4, pp. 1-26.[6851]

Beoku-Betts, Josephine / Day, Lynda (2014): Anatomy of an evolving movement, the women’s peace movement and political activism in Sierra Leone since the 1990s, in: Jenda, vol. 25.[6852]

Bouta, Tsjeard / Frerks, Georg / Hughes, Bib (2005): Gender and peacemaking in the Westafrican context, Netherlands Institute of International Relations, ‘Clingendael’, Conflict Research Unit, The Hague.[6853]

Conciliation Resources (2008): The role of women in the security sector, Peace, Security and Development Update, Conciliation Resources, New York. [6854]

Coulter, Chris (2006): Being a bush wife: Women’s lives through war and peace in northern Sierra Leone / Chris Coulter, PhD Dissertation, Department of Cultural Anthropology, Uppsala University, Uppsala.[6855]

Coulter, Chris (2006): Female fighters in the Sierra Leone war, Challenging the assumptions? In: Feminist Review, vol. 88, pp. 54-73.[6856]

Denov, Myriam / Gervais, Christine (2007): Negotiating (in)security, Agency, resistance, and resourcefulness among girls formerly associated with the Sierra Leone’s Revolutionary United Front, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 32, no. 4, pp. 885-910.[6858]

Denov, Myriam / Maclure, Richard (2006): Engaging the voices of girls in the aftermath of Sierra Leone's conflict, Experiences and perspectives in a culture of violence, in: Anthropologica (New Series), vol. 48, no. 1, p. 73-85[6857]

Higate, Paul (2004): Gender and peacekeeping, Case studies: The Democratic Republic of Congo and Sierra Leone, ISS Monographs, no. 91, Pretoria.[6859]

Higate, Paul (2005): Peacekeeping and gender, DRC and Sierra Leone. www.peacewomen.org[6860]

Higate, Paul / Henry, Marsha (2004): Engendering (in)security in peace support operations, in: Security Dialogue, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 481-498.[6861]

Human Rights Watch (2003): “We’ll kill you if you cry”, Sexual violence in the Sierra Leone conflict, Human Rights Watch, vol. 15, no. 1, New York.[6862]

Jambai, A, Mac Cormack, C. (1996): Maternal health, war and religious tradition: Autorative knowledge in Pujehun district, Sierra Leone, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 10, 2, pp. 270-286.[6863]

McCormack-Hale, Fredline (2009): NGOs and women’s capabilities in post-war settings, The case of Sierra Leone, in: Jenda, 15.[6866]

McKay, Susan (2005): Girls as ‘weapons of terror’ in Northern Uganda and Sierra Leonean rebel fighting forces, in. Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, vol. 28, pp. 385-397.[6864]

McKay, Susan (2005): Reconstructing fragile lives, Girls’ social reintegration in Northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, peace building and reconstruction, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 18-30.[6865]

Menzel, Anne (2020): The perils of recognized local agency, The case of victims of sexual violence and the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), in: Journal of International Relations and Development, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 584-606.[11665]

Molloy, Desmond (2004): The gender perspective as a deterrants to spoilers, The Sierra Leone experience, in: Conflict Trends, vol. 2, pp. 16-19.[6867]

Olaitan, Zainab / Isike, Christopher (2019): The role of the African Union in fostering women’s represenation in formal peacebuilding, a case study of Sierra Leone, in: Journal of African Union Studies, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 135-154.[6868]

Olson, Einar Odd / Scharffscher, Kristin (2004): Rape in refugee camps as organisational failures, in: International Journal of Human Rights, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 377-397.[6869]

Puechgirbal, Nadine (2004): Involving women in peace process, Lessons from four African countries (Burundi, DRC, Liberia and Sierra Leone, in: Karamé, Kari (ed.): Gender and peacebuilding in Africa, Training for Peace Programme, Norsk Utenrikspolitisk Institutt, Oslo, pp. 47-66.[6870]

Schroven, Anita (2006): Women after war, Gender mainstreaming and the social construction of identity in contemporary Sierra Leone, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[6871]

Schäfer, Rita (2008): Frauen und Kriege in Afrika, ein Beitrag zur Gender-Forschung, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[11885]

Sesay, Fatmata Lovetta (2004): Where there is no ‘safe haven’, Human rights abuses of Sierra Leonean women at home and in exile, in: Agenda, no. 59, pp. 22-31.[6872]

Sesay, Kadi (2005): Sierra Leone, Women in conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction, in: Rawwida / Etchart, Linda / Onubogu, Elsie / Johnson, Tina (eds.): Building sustainable peace, Gender mainstreaming in conflict transformation, Commonwealth Secretariat, London, pp. 183-190.[6873]

Solomon, Christiana (2005): The Mano River Union Sub-Region, The role of women in building peace, in: Baksh, Rawwida / Etchart, Linda / Onubogu, Elsie / Johnson, Tina (eds.): Building sustainable peace, Gender mainstreaming in conflict transformation, Commonwealth Secretariat, London, pp. 171-180.[6874]

UNHCR / Save the Children (2001): Sexual violence and exploitation, The experience of refugee children in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, unpublished report, UNHCR / Save the Children, Geneva / London.[6875]

politics

Abraham, A. (1974): Women chiefs in southern Sierra Leone, A rejoinder, in: Africana Research Bulletin, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 75-81.[7388]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1984): The political use of Sande ideology an symbolism, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 11, pp. 455-472.[7389]

Hoffer, Carol (1975): Bundu, Political implications of female solidarity in a secret society, in: Raphael, D. (ed.): Being female, Reproduction, power and change, Mouton, The Hague, pp. 155-173.[7390]

MacCormack, Carol (1975): Sande women and political power in Sierra Leone, in: West African Journal of Sociology and Political Sciences, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 42-50.[7391]

MacCormack, Carol (1982): Control of land, labour and capital in rural Southern Sierra Leone, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, London, pp. 35-53.[7392]

Schroven, Anita (2006): Women after war, Gender mainstreaming and the social construction of identity in contemporary Sierra Leone, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[7393]

Steady, Filomina Chioma (2006): Women and collective action in Africa, Development, democratization, and empowerment with special focus on Sierra Leone, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.[7394]

Religion - Christianity

Steady, Filomina Chioma (1978): Protestant women's associations in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: HAFKIN, Nancy J., BAY, Edna G. (Hg.): Women in Africa, Studies in social and ecnomic change, Stanford, Cal., Stanford University Press, pp. 213-238.[7698]

Strickrodt, Silke (2007): ‘If she no learn, she no get husband’, Christianity, domesticity and education at the Church Missionary society’s female institution in Freetown, 1848-1880, in: Comparativ, vol. 17, no. 5-6, pp. 14-35.[7699]

Religion - Islam

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Jambai, A, Mac Cormack, C. (1996): Maternal health, war and religious tradition: Autorative knowledge in Pujehun district, Sierra Leone, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 10, 2, pp. 270-286.[10292]

Leopold, R. S. (1983): The shaping of men and the making of metaphors, The meaning of white clay in Poro and Sande initiation society rituals, in: Anthropology, vol 7, no. 2, pp. 21-42.[10293]

MacCormack, Carol (1979): Sande, The public face of a secret society, in. Jules-Rosette, B. (ed.): New religions of Africa, Ablex Publishers, Norwood, pp. 27-37.[10294]

Richards, J.V.O. (1973): The Sande and some of the forces that inspired its creation or adaptation with some reference to the Poro, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, no. 1-2.[10295]

Rosen, David (1981): Dangerous women, ‘Ideology, ’knowledge’ and ritual among the Kono of Easterm Sierra Leone, Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 151-163.[10296]

Schäfer, Rita (1990): Die Sande-Frauengeheimgesellschaft der Mende in Sierra Leone. Ihre Organisation und Masken im zeitlichen, intra- und interethnischen Vergleich, Mundus Reihe Ethnologie, Bd. 36, Holos Verlag, Bonn.[10298]

Shaw, Rosalind (1985): Gender and the structuring of reality in Temne divination, An interactive study, in: Africa, vol. 55, no. 3, pp. 286-303.[10297]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Ferme, Mariane (2001): The underneath of things, Violence, history and everyday in Sierra Leone, University of California Press, Berkeley.[10505]

Human Rights Watch (2003): “We’ll kill you if you cry”, Sexual violence in the Sierra Leone conflict, Human Rights Watch, vol. 15, no. 1, New York.[10504]

Menzel, Anne (2020): The perils of recognized local agency, The case of victims of sexual violence and the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), in: Journal of International Relations and Development, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 584-606.[11666]

Sesay, Fatmata Lovetta (2004): Where there is no ‘safe haven’, Human rights abuses of Sierra Leonean women at home and in exile, in: Agenda, no. 59, pp. 22-31.[10506]

Thompson, Bankole (1991): Child abuse in Sierra Leone, Normative disparities, in: International Journal of Law and the Family, 5, pp. 13-23.[10507]

UNHCR / Save the Children (2001): Sexual violence and exploitation, The experience of refugee children in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, unpublished report, UNHCR / Save the Children, Geneva / London.[10508]

Vann, Beth (2002): Gender-based violence, Emerging issues in programs serving displaced populations, Repoductive health for refugees consortium, Publication of the JSI Research and Training Institute, Arlington.[10509]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Kuenyehia, Akua (ed.) (2004): Women and law in West Africa, Situational analysis of some key issues affecting women, Sedco Publishing, Accra.[11203]

society - families marriages

Bledsoe, Caroline (1980): Women and marriage in Kpelle society, University of California Press, Standford.[8849]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1989): Strategies of child-fosterage among Mende grannies in Sierra Leone, in: Lesthaeghe, Ron (ed.): Reproduction and social organization in Sub-Saharan Africa, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 442-474.[8850]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): The politics of children, Fosterage and social management of fertility among the Mende in Sierra Leone, in: Handwerker, Penn (ed.): Birth and power, Social change of reproduction, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 82-100.[8851]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): School fees and the marriage process for Mende girls in Sierra Leone, in: Sanday, Peggy / Goodenough, Ruth (eds.): Beyond the second sex, New directions ni the anthropology of gender, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelophia, pp. 283-309.[8852]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1993): The politics of polygyny in Mende education and child forsterage tansactions, in: Miller, Barbara Diane (ed.): Sex and gender hierachies, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 170-192.[8853]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1995): Marginal members, Children of previous unions in Mende households in Sierra Leone, in: Grennhalgh, S. (ed.): Situating fertility, Anthropological and demographic inquiry, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 130-153.[8854]

Dorjahn, V.K. (1958): Fertility, polygyny and their interrelation in Temne society, in: American Anthropologist, 60, pp. 838-859.[8855]

Dorjahn, V.K. (1988): Changes in Temne polygyny, in: Ethnology, vol. 27, pp. 367-389.[8856]

Gage, Anastasia / Bledsoe, Caroline (1994): The effects of education and social stratification on marriage and the transition to parenthood in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 148-164.[8857]

Issac, Barry (1980): Female fertility and marital form among the Mende of Rural Upper Bambara Chiefdom, Sierra Leone, in: Ethnology, pp. 297-313.[8858]

Little, Kenneth (1966): Attitudes of marriage and the family among educated young Sierra Leonians, in: Lloyd, P.C. (ed.): The new elites of tropical Africa, Oxford University Press, London, pp. 139-162.[8859]

Little, Kenneth / Price, Anne (1967): Some trends in modern marriage among West Africans, in: Africa, 37, pp. 407-425.[8860]

Steady, Filomina Chioma (1987): Polygamy and the household economy in a fishing village in Sierra Leone, in: Parkin, David /Nyamwaya, David (eds.): Transformation of African marriage, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp. 211-230.[8861]

Thompson, Bankole (1991): Child abuse in Sierra Leone, Normative disparities, in: International Journal of Law and the Family, 5, pp. 13-23.[8862]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - masculinities

Leopold, R. S. (1983): The shaping of men and the making of metaphors, The meaning of white clay in Poro and Sande initiation society rituals, in: Anthropology, vol 7, no. 2, pp. 21-42.[9304]

society - migration and urbanisation

Knörr, Jacqueline (2000): Female secret societies and their impact on ethnic and trans-ethnic identities among migrant women in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: Knörr, Jacqueline / Meier, Barbara (eds.): Women and migration, Anthropological perspectives, Campus Verlag, Frankfurt a.M, pp. 80-98.[9736]

society - women's organisations

Bledsoe, Caroline (1984): The political use of Sande ideology an symbolism, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 11, .455-472.[10060]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1990): School girls and school fees among the Mende in Sierra Leone, in: Sanday, P. / Goodenough, R. (eds.): Beyond the second sex, University of Pennesylvania Press, Philadelphia, pp.283-290.[10061]

Bledsoe, Caroline (1995): Marginal members, Children of previous unioins in Mende households in Sierra Leone, in: Grennhalgh, pp. (ed.): Situating fertility, Anthropological and demographic inquiry, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp.130-153.[10062]

Day, Lynda (2008): ‘Bottom power’, Theorizing feminism and the women’s movement in Sierra Leone, 1981-2007, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, pp.491-513.[10064]

D’Azvedo, W.L. (1980): Gola Poro and Sande, Primal task in social custodianship, in: Ethnologische Zeitschrift Zürich, 1, pp.13-24.[10063]

Hoffer, Carol (1975): Bundu, Political implications of female solidarity in a secret society, in: Raphael, D. (ed.): Being female, Reproduction, power and change, Mouton, The Hague, pp.155-173.[10065]

Ketkar, S.L. (1978): Female education and fertility, Some evidence from Sierra Leone, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 13, no. 1, pp.23-33.[10066]

MacCormack, Carol (1979): Sande, The public face of a secret society, in. Jules-Rosette, B. (ed.): New religions of Africa, Norwood, Ablex Publishers.[10067]

MacCormack, Carol (1980): Proto social to adult, A Sherbro transformation, in: MacCormack, Carol / Strathern, Marilyn (eds.): Nature, culture and gender, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[10068]

MacCormack, Carol (1997): Health, fertility and birth in Moyamba District, Sierra Leone, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.) Power, reproduction and gender: Intergenerational transfer of knowledge, Zed Books, London, pp.75-114.[10069]

Richards, J.V.O. (1973): The Sande and some of the forces that inspired its creation or adaptation with some reference to the Poro, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, no. 1-2.[10073]

Richards, J.V.O. (1974): The Sande, A socio-cultural organisation in the Mende community in Sierra Leone, in: Baessler Archiv, vol. 22, no. 2, pp.265-281.[10074]

Schäfer, Rita (1990): Die Sande-Frauengeheimgesellschaft der Mende in Sierra Leone. Ihre Organisation und Masken im zeitlichen, intra- und interethnischen Vergleich. Mundus Reihe Ethnologie, Bd. 36, Holos Verlag, Bonn.[10070]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit - Traditionelle und moderne afrikanische Frauenzusammenschlüsse im interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler.[10071]

Schäfer, Rita (1997): Geschlechterbeziehungen der Mende, Sierra Leone, am Beispiel der Initiation in den Sande- und Poro-Bund, in: Völger, Gisela (Hg.): Frauenmacht und Männerherrschaft - Geschlechterbeziehungen im Kulturvergleich, Materialienbände zur Ausstellung „Frauenmacht und Männerherrschaft“ des Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museums für Völkerkunde, Köln.[10072]

Steady, Filomina Chioma (1978): Protestant women's associations in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in: HAFKIN, Nancy J., BAY, Edna G. (Hg.): Women in Africa, Studies in social and ecnomic change, Stanford, Cal: Stanford University Press, pp. 213-238.[10075]

Steady, Filomina Chioma (2006): Women and collective action in Africa, Development, democratization, and empowerment with special focus on Sierra Leone, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.[10076]

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