Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Senegal

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Ba, Fama Hane / Ndiays, Aminata et al. (1984): The impact of territorial administration reform on the situation of women in Senegal, in: ILO (ed.): Rural development and women in Africa, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp.107-116.[876]

Basse, Marie-Thérèse (1984): Women, food and nutrition in Africa, Perspective from Senegal, in: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, vol.10, no. 1, pp.65-71.[877]

Creevey, Lucy (2002): Structural adjustment and the empowerment (or disempowerment) of women in Niger and Senegal, in: Datta, Rekha / Kornberg, Judith (eds.): Women in developing countries: Assessing strategies for empowerment, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp.93-112.[878]

David, Rosalind (1994): „Without their money we couldn’t stay any longer“, Effects of male out-migration on women’s management of natural resource base in Diourbel (Senegal) in: Grawert, Elke (Hg.): Wandern oder bleiben? Veränderungen der Lebens- und Arbeitsbedingungen von Frauen im Sahel durch die Arbeitsmigration der Männer, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp.192-216.[879]

David, Rosalind / Niang, Khayri Omoul (1995): Case study: Senegal, Focus on the compound, in: David, Rosalind (ed.): Changing places? Women, resource management and migration in the Sahel, SOS Sahel Publications, London, pp.35-49.[880]

Diop, Tine Ngoné / Sy, Mohamadou (2003): Women and land in Africa, A case study from Senegal, in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land rights in Africa, Culture, religion and realizing women’s rights, Zed Books, London, pp.207-231.[881]

Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO (1998): Country case study: Senegal, in: Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO): Agricultural implements used by women farmers in Africa, FAO Publications, Rome, pp.48-61.[882]

Helsloot, Lucia (1989): Vegetable gardens as a strategy to improve the position of rural women – The case of Ile à Morphil, Senegal, in: Acta Horticulturae, 270, pp.359-368.[883]

Koopman, Jeanne (2009): Globalization, Gender and poverty in the Senegal River Valley, in: Feminist Economy, vol. 15, no. 3, pp.274-279.[884]

Lachenmann, Gudrun (1992): Frauen als gesellschaftliche Kraft im sozialen Wandel in Afrika, in: Peripherie, Nr. 47/48, pp.74-93.[885]

Linares, Olga F. (1985): Cash crops and gender constructs: The Jola of Senegal, in: Ethnology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp.83-93.[886]

Muylwijk, Joke / Smetsers, Maria (1996): Gender and agricultural engineering: A case study in Senegal, in: Muylwijk, Joke / Smetsers, Maria: Gender and agricultural engineering, An overview of current theory and praxis, Department of Gender Studies in Agriculture and The Agricultural Engineering Branch of the FAO, AGSE Occasional Paper, Wageningen, pp.37-61.[887]

Patterson, Amy (2002): The impact of Senegal’s decentralization on women in local governance, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp.490-529.[888]

Perry, Donna (2002): Microcredit and women money lenders, The shifting terrain of credit in rural Senegal, in: Human Organization, vol. 61, no. 1, pp.30-40.[889]

Pethke, Brigitta (1988): Wir die Frauen ..., Senegalesische Bäuerinnen aus der Casamance sind nicht stumm, Studie des Weltfriedensdienstes, WFD-Dokumentation, Berlin.[890]

Rodet, Marie (2007): Senegal, Gender und Landrechte, Gender Box, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, VIDC, Wien.[891]

Smetsers, Maria (1995): Gender and agrarian chance in Senegal: Cooperation and conflict, in: Agrarian Questions: The politics of farming anno 1995, Proceedings, vol.4, Wageningen Agricultural University, Wageningen, pp.1559-1574.[892]

Smetsers, Maria (2002): Gender, household composition, and adoption of soil fertility technologies, A study of women rice farmers in Southern Senegal, in: African Studies Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 1-2, pp.1-12.[893]

Thiam, Abou / Sissoko, Seynabou (2003): A women’s work is never done, Agriculture in Senegal, in: Jacobs, Mirriam / Dinham, Barbara (eds.): Silent invaders, Pesticides, livelihoods and women’s health, Zed Books, London, pp.78-84.[894]

Venema, L.B. (1986): The changing role of women in Sahelian agriculture, in: Creevey, Lucy (ed.): Women farmers in Africa, Rural development in Mali and in the Sahel, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse, pp.89-94.[895]

Yoon, Young, Soon (1983): Women's garden groups in Casamance, Senegal, in: Assignment Children, vol. 63/64, pp.133-153.[896]

arts and culture

Ellerson, Beti / Faye, Safi (2004): Africa through a woman's eyes, Safi Faye's cinema, in: Pfaff, Francoise (ed.): Focus on African Films, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 185-202.[1543]

Fall, F. (2002): Senegal: The place of women in the museum of Saint Louis, in: Adande, A. / Arinze, E. (eds.): Museums and urban culture in West Africa, James Currey for the International African Institute, Oxford, pp. 143-150.[1544]

Heath, Deborah (1994): The politics of appropriateness and appropriation, Recontextualizing women’s dance in urban Senegal, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 88-103.[1545]

Lagoutte, Christine (1988): L’artisant féminin dans la région du Fleuve Sénegal, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 466-471.[1546]

Langeveld, Kirsten (2002): Gender and the ´kankurang´ mask: An analysis of myth and female ritual, in: Mande Studies, no. 4, pp. 83-100. [1547]

Langeveld, Kirsten (2004): Initiation rituals as the stage of interaction between genders, in: Mande Studies, no. 6, pp. 113-137.[1548]

Mushengyezi, Aaron (2004): Reimaging gender and African tradition? Ousmane Sembène’s Xala revisited, in: Africa Today, vol. 51, no. 1.[1549]

Orlando, Valerie K. (2004): African feminine transformative consciousness in francophone cinema, Moussa sene absa's `Tableau ferraille (1996)', in: African Identities, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 189-202.[1550]

Short, Julianne (2000): ‘Have you heard the words of our elders?’ Senior Bamana women's Sidikou, in: Aissata G. (ed.): Recreating words, reshaping worlds: The verbal art of women in Niger, Mali and Senegal, in: Africa World Press, Trenton,[1552]

Sidikou, Aissata (2001): Recreating worlds, reshaping worlds, The verbal art of women from Niger, Mali and Senegal, Africa World Press, Trenton.[1551]

economy - formal and informal employment

Guérien, Isabelle (2006): Women and money, Lessons from Senegal, in: Development and Change, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 549-570.[1758]

economy - Households

Buggenhagen, Beth A. (2001): Prophets and profits, Gendered and generational visions of wealth and value in Senegalese Murid households, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 31, no. 4.[1997]

Dufournaud, C.M. (1994): A partial equilibrium analysis of the impact of introducing more efficient wood-burning stoves into households in the Sahelian region, in: Environment and Planning, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 407-414.[1998]

Linares, Olga F. (1984): Households among the Diola of Senegal: Should norms enter by the front or the back door? in: Netting, Robert / Wilk, Richard / Arnould, Eric (eds.): Households: Comparative and historical studies of the domestic group, University of California Press, Berkeley. pp. 407-445.[1999]

Sullivan, Amy J. (2002): Gender, household composition, and adoption of soil fertility technologies, A study of women rice farmers in Southern Senegal, in: African Studies Quarterly, vol. 6, no. 1-2.[2000]

Venema, L.B. (1980): Male and female farming systems and agricultural intensification in West Africa: The case of the Wolof, Senegal, in: Presvelou, Clio / Spijvers-Zwart, S.I. (eds.): Household, Women and agricultural Development, Publications of the University of Wageningen, Wageningen, pp. 27-34.[2001]

economy - markets and traders

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - pastoralism

no entries to this combination of country and topic

education schooling and tertiary education

Barthel, Diane (1975): The rise of a female professional elite: The case of Senegal, in: African Studies Review, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 1-17.[2787]

Barthel, Diane (1985): Women’s educational experience under colonialism: Toward dichronic model, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 11, no. 1, pp.137-154.[2788]

Mbow, Penda (1992): Illiteracy and poverty among women: The case of Senegal, in: UNESCO Africa, no. 4, pp. 21-25.[2789]

Sidibe, A.S. (1991): Study on the female staff in higher education and research in Senegal, in: Faruqui, Akhtar M. / Hassan, Mohamed H.A. / Sandri, Gabriella (eds.): The role of women in the development of science and technology in the third world, World Scientific, Teaneck, pp. 314-348.[2790]

health - fgc fgm

Dellenborg, Liselott (2004): A reflection on the cultural meanings of female circumcision, Experiences from fieldwork in Casamance, Southern Senegal, in: Arnfred, Signe (ed.): Re-Thinking Sexualities in Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 79-86.[3201]

Herlund, Ylva / Shell-Duncan, Bettina (2007): Contingency, context, and change, Negotiating female gential cutting in the Gambia and Senegal, in: Africa Today, vol. 53, no. 4.[3202]

TOSTAN (ed.) (1999): Breakthrough in Senegal, Ending female genital cutting, Dakar. [3203]

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Abbott, Rachel C. / Ndour-Saar, Anta N. / Ndoye, T. et al. (1994): Risk factors for HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection in pregnant women in Dakar, Senegal, in: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, vol. 7, no. 7, pp. 711-717.[3695]

Laurent, Christian / Seck, Karim / Coumba, Ndeye et al. (2003): Prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, and risk behaviours in unregistered sex workers in Dakar, Senegal, in: AIDS, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1811-1816.[3696]

Niang, C. (1995): Socio-cultural factors favouring HIV infection and the integration of traditional women’s associations in AIDS prevention in Kolda, Senegal, Report for the Women and AIDS Research Program, International Center for Research on Women, Washington D.C.[3697]

Oestergaard, Lise Rosendal Samuelsen H. (2004): Muted voices: HIV/AIDS and the young people of Burkina Faso and Senegal, in: African Journal of AIDS Research, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 103-112.[3698]

Renaud, Michelle Lewis (1997): Women at the crossroads: A prostitute community’s response to AIDS in urban Senegal, Gordon Publishers, Amsterdam.[3699]

Teunis, N. (2001): Same-sex sexuality in Africa, A case from Senegal, in: AIDS and Behavior, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 173-182.[3700]

health - reproduction and fertility

Bob, Codou (2005): Islam and women’s sexual health and rights in Senegal, in: Muslim World Journal of Human Rights, no. 2, no. 1, pp.1-30.[4783]

Enel, Catherine / Pison, Gilles / Lefebvre, Monique (1994): Migration and marriage chance, A case study of Mlomp, A Joola village in Southern Senegal, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp. 92-116.[4784]

Garenne, Michael / van de Wall, Etienne (1989): Polygyny and fertility among the Serer of Senegal, in: Population Studies, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 41-59.[4785]

Goldberg, Howard I. / M'Bodji, Fara G. / Friedman, Jay S. (1986): Fertility and family planning in one region of Senegal, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 116-122.[4786]

Katz, Karen / Nare, Christine (2002): Reproductive health knowledge and use of services among young adults in Dakar, Senegal, in: Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 215-231.[4787]

Nare, Christine / Katz, Karen / Tolley, Elizabeth (1997): Adolescents' access to reproductive health and family planning services in Dakar (Senegal), in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol.1, no. 2, pp. 15-25.[4788]

Posner, J.K. / Mbodji, F. (1989): Men's attitudes about family planning in Dakar, Senegal, in: Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 279-291.[4789]

Ronsmans, Carine (1996): Birth spacing and child survival in rural Senegal, in: International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 989-997.[4790]

Saila-Ngita, D. / Bravo-Ureta, B.E. / Perez-Escamilla, R. (2003): Fertility desires and sample selection bias, The case of Senegal, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 1-16.[4791]

Whittemore, Robert D. / Beverly, E.A. (1996): Mandinka mothers and nurslings, Power and reproduction, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 45-62.[4792]

health

Foley, Ellen E. (2001): No money, no care, Women and health sector reform in Senegal, in: Urban Anthropology, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 1-50.[5065]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Baum, Robert (2004): Crimes of the dream world, French trials of Diola witches in colonial Sengal, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 201-228.[5459]

Baye´M , Babacar (2013): The origins of Senegalese homophobia, Discourses on homosexuals and transgender people in colonial and postcolonial Senegal, in: African Studies Review, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 109-128. [11768]

Fall, Babacar (2001): Senegalese women in politics: A portrait of two female leaders, Arame Diène and Thioumbé Samb, 1945-1996, in: White, Luise / Miescher, Stephan F. / Cohen, David William (eds.): African words, African voices: Critical practices in oral history, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 214-223.[5460]

Jones, Hilary (2005): From `mariage a la mode' to weddings at town hall, Marriage, colonialism and mixed-race society in nineteenth-century Senegal, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 38, no.1, pp. 27-48.[5461]

Reinwald, Brigitte (1995): Der Reichtum der Frauen, Leben und Arbeit der weiblichen Bevölkerung der Siin/Senegal unter dem Einfluß der französischen Kolonialisation, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg.[5462]

Reinwald, Brigitte (1997): Changing family strategies as a response to colonial challenge, Microanalytic observations on Siin/Senegal, 1890-1960, in: History of the Family, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 183-195.[5463]

Wick, Christelle (2000): Die Kleidung als zweite Haut – Mode, Status und Identität von Mischlingsfrauen im kolonialen Senegal, in: de Jong, Willemijn / Möwe, Illona / Roth, Claudia (Hg.): Bilder und Realitäten der Geschlechter, Argonaut Verlag, Zürich, pp. 43-66.[5464]

Literature

Abubakar, Rashidah Ismalili (1993): The emergence of Mariama Bâ, in: Gurnah, Abdulrazak (ed.): Essays on African writing, A re-evaluation, Heinemann Publishers, London, pp. 24-37.[5972]

Abuk, Christina (2003): Urbanisation's long shadows, Mariama Ba's ‘So long a letter’, in: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 723-740.[5973]

Arungwa, C.I. (1993): Fiction and pressivism in children's education, A study of Aminata Sow-Fall's `L'Appel des Arenes', in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 6, no. 1.[5974]

Azodo, Ada (ed.) (2003): Emerging perspectives on Mariama Ba, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5975]

Azodo, Ada (ed.) (2007): Emerging perspectives on Aminta Sow Fall, The real and the imaginary in her novels, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5976]

Bayi, Omofolabo (1997): Negritude, feminism and the quest for identity, Re-reading Mariama Ba's `So long a letter', in: Women's Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 35-52.[5977]

Bugul, Ken (1991): The abandoned baobab, The autobiography of a Senegalese woman, Chicago Review Press, Chicago.[5978]

Busia, Abena (1991): Rebellious women: Fictional biographies - Nawal el Sadawi’s Women at Point Zero and Mariama Bâ’s So Long a Letter, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 88-98.[5979]

Cham, Mbeye (1984): The female condition in Africa, a literary exploration by Mariama Ba, in: A Currret Bibliography on African Affairs, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 161-171.[5980]

Cham, Mbeye (1987): Contemporary society and the female imagination: A study of the novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.): Women in African literature today, London, pp. 89-101.[5981]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5985]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1986): The concept of choice in Mariama Bâ’s fiction, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 161-171.[5982]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1994): Mariama Bâ: Intersections of gender, race, class and culture, in: Assiba D’Almeida, Irène: Francophone African women writers, Destroying the emptiness of silence, Gainesville, pp. 98-122.[5983]

D’Almeida, Irène Assiba (1994): Aminata Sow Fall: Political Responsibilities, in: Assiba D’Almeida, Irène (ed.): Francophone African women writers, Destroying the emptiness of silence, Gainesville, pp. 140-153.[5984]

Edson, Laurie (1993): Mariama Ba and the politics of the family, in: Studies in Twentieth Century Literature, vol. 17, no. 1.[5986]

Edwin, Shirin (2004): African Muslim communities in diaspora, The quest for a Muslim space in Ken Bugul’s Le Baobab fou, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 35, pp. 91-104.[5987]

Esonvanne, Uzo (1997): Enlightment epistomology and „aesthetic cognition“: Mariama Bâ’s So long a letter, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Press, London, pp. 82-100.[5988]

Gehrmann, Susanne (2000): Empowerment and crisis, Re-reading women characters in Aminata Sow Fall’s novels, in: Ständler, Katharina / Trüper, Ursula (eds.): Afrikanische Frauen und kulturelle Globalisierung, Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, Köln, pp. 131-144.[5989]

Hawkins, Peter (1988): An interview with Aminata Sow Fall, in: African Affairs, vol. 87, no. 348, pp. 419-430.[5990]

Hawkins, Peter (1996): Marxist intertext, islamic reinscription? Some common themes in the novels of Sembaene Ousmane and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Ibnlfassi, Laola / Hitchcott, Nicki M. (eds.): African francophone writing, A critical introduction, Berg, Oxford/Providence Rhode Island.[5991]

Innes, C.L. (1991): Mothers or sisters? Identity, discourse and audience in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo and Mariama Bâ, in: Nasta, Susheila (ed.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Caribbean and South Asia, London, pp. 129-151.[5992]

Irlam, Shaun (1998): Mariama Ba's ‘Une si longue lettre’:,The vocation of memory and the space of writing, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 76-93.[5993]

Jagne, S.F. (1998): Mariama Ba, in: Parekh, P.N. / Jagne, S.F. (eds.): Postcolonial African writers, Fitzroy Dearborn, London, pp. 59-74.[5994]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London.[5995]

Julien, Eileen (2007): When a man loves a woman, Gender and national identity in Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Mariama Ba’s Scarlet Song, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 205-222.[5996]

Ka, Aminata Maiga (1985): Tamatoulaye, Aissatou, Mirelle et …Mariama Ba, in: Notre Librairie, 81, pp. 129-134.[5997]

Kamara, Gibreel M. (2001): The feminist struggle in the Senegalese novel, Mariama Ba and Sembene Ousmane, in: Journal of Black Studies, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 212-228.[5998]

Kemp, Yakini B. (1999): Romantic love and the individual in novels by Mariama Ba, Buchi Emecheta, and Bessie Head, in: Liddell, Janice L. / Kemp, Yakini B. (eds.): Arms akimbo, African women in contemporary literature, University of Florida Press, Gainesville. [5999]

Kimball, A.M. / Cisse, S. / Fayemi, G. et al. (2000): Mariama Ba's ‘Une si longue lettre’ and subverting a mythology of sex-based oppression, in: Research in African literatures, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 132-150.[6004]

Kolawole, M. (1992): Miriama Ba and Nawal el Saadawi, Varying approaches to feminism, in: Ondo Journal of English Studies, vol. 6, pp. 23-31.[6005]

Larrier, Renée (1997): Francophone African women autobiographies, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Publications, London, pp. 192-202.[6000]

Latha, R.H. (2001): Feminisms in an African context, Mariama Ba's `so long a letter', in: Agenda, no. 50, pp. 23-40.[6001]

Makward, Edris (1986): Marriage, tradition and women’s pursuit of happiness in the novels of Mariama Bâ. in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 271-181.[6002]

Makward, Edris (1991): Women, tradition and religion in Sembaene Ousmane's work, in: Harrow, Kenneth W. (ed.): Faces of Islam in African Literature, Studies in African Literature Series, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, pp. 187-199.[6003]

Makward, Edris (1986): Marriage, tradition and women’s pursuit of happiness in the novels of Mariama Bâ. in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 271-181.[6006]

Marcinowski, Bettina (1982): Die Frau in Afrika, Eine Untersuchung zum schwarzafrikanischen frankophonen Roman Kameruns und Senegals, Frankfurt a.M.[6007]

Mbeye, B. (1987): Contemporary society and the female imagination, A study of the novels of Mariama Ba, in: African Literture Today, 14.[6008]

McElaney-Johnson, Ann (1999): Epistolary friendship: La prise de parole in Mariama Ba’s Une si longue lettre, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 110-121.[6009]

McNee, Lisa A. (2000): Selfish gifts, Senegalese women's autobiographical discourses, in: State University of New York Press, New York.[6010]

Miller, Mary-Kay F. (1996): My mothers / my selves: (Re)Reading a tradition of West African women’s autobiography, in: Research in African Literatures, 27, pp. 5-14.[6011]

Mojola, Yemi I. (1997): The onus of womanhood, Mariama Ba and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African Women, Gender, Popular Culture and Literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London/Atlantic Highlands.[6012]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Women’s voice: Mariama Bâ, Assia Djebar, in: Mortimer, Mildred: Journeys through the French African novel, James Currey, London, pp. 133-164.[6013]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Women’s flight, in: Mortimer, Mildred: Journeys through the French African novel, James Currey, London, pp. 165-177.[6014]

Mortimer, Mildred (1990): Enclosure and disclosure in Mariama Ba’s Une si longue letre, in: The French Review, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 69-78.[6015]

Moyola, Ibiyemi (1997): The onus of womanhood: Mariama Bâ and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 126-136.[6016]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London.[6017]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[6018]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1990): Mariama Bâ: Parallels, Convergence, and interior space, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 13-35.[6019]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1997): Urban speaces, women’s places: Polygymy as sign in Mariama Bâ’s novels, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (Hg.): The politics of (m)othering, Womenhood, identity, and resistance in African literature, Routledge Press, London, pp. 162-191.[6020]

Nwachukwu-Agbada, J.O.J. (1991): „One wife be for one man“, Mariama Bâ’s doctrine for matrimony, in: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 561-573.[6021]

Ojo Ade, Femi (1982): Still a victim? Mariama Bâ’s „Une si longue lettre“ in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 71-87.[6022]

Plant, Deborah (1996): Mythic dimensions in the novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 102-111.[6023]

Prabhu, Anjali (2003): Mariama Ba’s So long a letter, Women, culture and development from a francophone/post-colonial perspective, in: Bhavnani, Kum-Kum / Foran, John / Kurian, Priya (eds.): Feminist futures, Re-imagining women, culture and development, Zed Books, London, pp. 239-255.[6024]

Riez, János (1990): Mariama Bâ’s Une si longue letter: An Erziehungsroman, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 27-42.[6025]

Sarvan, Charles Ponnuthurai (1988): Feminism and African fiction, The novels of Mariama Bâ, in: Modern Fiction Studies, vol. 34, no. 3, pp. 453-464.[6026]

Sidikou, Aissata (2001): Recreating worlds, reshaping worlds, The verbal art of women from Niger, Mali and Senegal, Africa World Press, Trenton.[6027]

Sougou, Omar (2002): Resisting hybridity, Colonial and postcolonial youth in ‘Ambiguous adventure’ by Cheikh Hamidou Kane and `L'appel des arenes' by Aminata Sow Fall, in: Matatu, no. 25/26, pp. 213-27.[6028]

Sougou, Omar (2008): Transformational narratives: Hearing/reading selected Senegalese folktales by young women, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 26-38.[6029]

Staunton, Cheryl A. (1994): Mariama Ba, Pioneer Senegalese woman novelist, in: CLA Journal, vol. 37, no. 3, pp. 328-335.[6030]

Stratton, Florence (1994): „Literature as a weapon“: The novels of Mariama Bâ, in: dieselbe: Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 133-157.[6031]

Stringer, Susan (1996): Through their own eyes, The Senegalese novel by women, Peter Lang Publishers, Frankfurt a.M.[6032]

Stringer, Susan (1988): Cultural conflict in the novels of two African writers: Mariama Ba and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Sage, pp. 36-41.[6033]

Taiwo, Oladele (1984): Mariama Ba, in: Taiwo, Oladele: Female novelists in modern Africa, London.[6034]

Treiber, Jeanette (1996): Feminism and identity politics: Mariama Bâ’s Un chant écarlate, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 111-123.[6035]

Wills, Dorothy D. (1995): Economic violence in postcolonial senegal, Noisy silence in novels by Mariama Ba and Aminata Sow Fall, in: Lashgari, Deidre (ed.): Violence, silence, and anger, Women's writing as transgression, University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville.[6036]

Wylie, Hal (1997): Sow Fall, Sembene, Achebe and Senghor, Literary representations of political realities, in: Egejuru, Phanuel A. / Katrak, Ketu H. (eds.): Nwanyibu: Womanbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton.[6037]

Yousaf, Nahem (1995): The ‘public’ versus the ‘private’ in Mariama Ba's novels, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 85-98.[6038]

Zucker, Marilyn S. (1997): On teaching ‘The abandoned baobab, A Senegalese woman's autobiography’, in: Women's Studies Quarterly, vol. 25, no. 3-4, pp. 121-138.[6039]

media

Abdela, Lesley (2007): ‘Anyone here been raped and speaks English? Workshop for editors and journalists on gender based violence and sex-trafficing, in: Gender and Development, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 387-398.[6558]

Mushengyezi, Aaron (2004): Reimaging gender and African tradition? Ousmane Sembène’s Xala revisited, in: Africa Today, vol. 51, no. 1.[6559]

Venables, Emilie (2008): Senegalese women and the cyber café: Online dating and aspirations of transnational migration in Ziguinchor, in: African and Asian Studies, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 471-490. [6560]

Wittmann, Frank (2003): Zur Ambivalenz des Populärjournalismus in Senegal, Strategische Aneignung und mediale Repräsentation der Hausmädchen, in: Afrika Spectrum, 38, 2, pp. 153-172.[6561]

politics - wars violent conflicts

Amnesty International (2003): Senegal, Casamance women speak out, Amnesty International, AFR 49/002/2003, London.[11911]

Bakari, Rukia (2021): Women and Peacebuilding: The use of traditional methods of conflict resolution by women from Casamance, Senegal, Timbuktu Institute, African Centre for Peace Studies, Dakar.[11910]

politics

Fall, Babacar (2001): Senegalese women in politics: A portrait of two female leaders, Arame Diène and Thioumbé Samb, 1945-1996, in: White, Luise / Miescher, Stephan F. / Cohen, David William (eds.): African words, African voices: Critical practices in oral history, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 214-223.[7398]

Patterson, Amy (2002): The impact of Senegal’s decentralization on women in local governance, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 490-529.[7399]

Toraasen, Marianne (2019): Gender parity and the symbolic representation of women in Senegal, in: The Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 459-481. [11912]

Villalón, L.A. (1999): Generational changes, political stagnation, and the evolving dynamics of religion and political change in Senegal, in: Africa Today, 3, 4, pp. 129-147.[7400]

Religion - Christianity

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - Islam

Bop, C. (2005): Roles and the position of women in Sufi brotherhoods in Senegal, in: Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 73, 4, pp. 1099-1119.[7978]

Buggenhagen, Beth A. (2001): Prophets and profits, Gendered and generational visions of wealth and value in Senegalese Murid households, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 373-401.[7979]

Buggenhagen, Beth A. (2004): Domestic object(ion)s, The Senegalese Murid trade diaspora and the politics of marriage payments, love, and state privatization, in: Weiss, Brad (ed.): Producing African futures, Ritual and reproduction in a neoliberal age, Brill, Leiden/Boston.[7980]

Cantone, C. (2005): ‚Radicalisme’ au feminin? Les filles voilées et l’appropriation de l’espace dans les mosquées à Darkar, in: Gomez-Perez, M. (ed.): L’Islam politique au sud du Sahara, Identités, discours et enjeux, Karthala, Paris, pp. 119-130.[7981]

Coulon, C. (1988): Women, Islam, and baraka, in: O’Biren, Cruise / Coulon, C. (eds.): Charisma and brotherhood in African Islam, Claredon Press, Oxford.[7982]

Creevey, Lucy (1991): The impact of Islam on women in Senegal, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 55-69.[7983]

Creevey, Lucy (1996): Islam, women and the role of the state in Senegal, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 268-307.[7984]

Gemmeke, Amber (2007): Marabout women in Dakar, Creating trust in a rural urban space, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[7985]

Gemmeke, Amber (2009): Marabout women in Dakar, Creating authority in Islamic knowledge, in: Africa, vol. 79, pp. 129-147.[7986]

Lachenmann, Gudrun (2004): Weibliche Räume in muslimischen Gesellschaften Westafrikas, in: Peripherie, Nr. 95, pp. 322-340.[7987]

Linares, Olga F. (1992): Power, prayer and production: The Jola of Casamance, Senegal, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[7988]

Makward, Edris (1991): Women, tradition and religion in Sembaene Ousmane's work, in: Harrow, Kenneth W. (ed.): Faces of Islam in African Literature, Studies in African Literature Series, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, pp. 187-199.[7989]

Mbow, Penda (1997): Lews femmes, L’Islam et les associations religieuses au Sénégal, in: Rosander, E.E. (ed.): Transforming female identities, Women’s organizational forms in West Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 148-159.[7990]

Rosander, Eva Evers (1997): Women in groups in Africa, Female assoicational patterns in Senegal and Morocco, in: Chatty, Cawn / Rabo, Annika (eds.): Organizing women, Formal and informal women’s groups in the Middle East, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 101-123.[7991]

Rosander, Eva Evers (1997): Women and mouridism in Senegal, The case of the Mam Diarra Cousso dahira in Mbacke, in: Rosander, Eva (ed.): Transforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 110-130.[7992]

Rosander, Eva Evers (1998): Women and muridism in Senegal, The case of Mam Diarra Bousso Daira in Mbacké, in: Ask, K. /Tjomsland, M. (eds.): Women and islamisation, Contemporary dimensions of discourse on gender relations, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 147-175.[7993]

Rosander, Eva Evers (2004): Going and not going to Porokhane, Mourid women and pilgrimage in Senegal and Spain, in: Coleman, Simon / Eade, John (eds.): Reframing pilgrimage, Cultures in motion, Routledge, London/New York.[7994]

Sieveking, Nadine (2007): ‚We don’t want equality, we want to be given our rights’, Muslim women negotiating global development concepts in Senegal, in: Afrika Spectrum, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 29-48.[7995]

Sow, Fatou (1996): Family law in Sengegal, Continuity and change, in: Women living under Muslim Law (WLUML): Shifting boundaries in marriage and divorce in Muslim communities, Special Dossier, vol. 1, pp. 142-157.[7996]

Sow, Fatou (2003): Fundamentalisms, globalisation and women’s human rights in Senegal, in: Gender and Development, 11, 1, pp. 69-76.[7997]

Villalón, L.A. (1999): Generational changes, political stagnation, and the evolving dynamics of religion and political change in Senegal, in: Africa Today, 3, 4, pp. 129-147.[7998]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Langeveld, Kirsten (2002): Gender and the ´kankurang´ mask: An analysis of myth and female ritual, in: Mande Studies, no. 4, pp. 83-100. [10289]

Langeveld, Kirsten (2004): Initiation rituals as the stage of interaction between genders, in: Mande Studies, no. 6, pp. 113-137.[10290]

Madge, Clare (2000): Forest spirits and the negotiation of ethnicity and gender among the Jola, in: Cline-Cole, R.A. / Madge, Clare (eds.): Contesting Forestry in West Africa, Ashgate, Aldershot/Burlington, pp. 124-147.[10291]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Baum, Robert (2004): Crimes of the dream world, French trials of Diola witches in colonial Sengal, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 201-228.[11197]

Diop Tine, Ngoné / Sy, Mohamadou (2003): Women and land in Africa: A case study from Senegal, in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land in Africa: Culture, religion and realizing women's rights, Zed Books, London, pp. 207-231.[11198]

London, Scott (2010): Constructing law, contesting violence, The Senegalese Family Code and narratives of domestic abuse, in: Burrill, Emily / Roberts, Richard / Thornberry, Elizabeth (eds.): Domestic violence and the law in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 239-255.[11199]

Rodet, Marie (2004): Frauen im Spannungsfeld des “Droit colonial”, Zwei Fallbeispiele aus der Region Kayes, Senegal, Soudan Francais (1918 und 1938), in: Stichproben, 7, 4, pp. 89-106.[11200]

Sow, F. (1996): Family law in Sengegal, Continuity and change, in: Women living under Muslim Law (WLUML): Shifting boundaries in marriage and divorce in Muslim communities, Special Dossier, vol. 1, pp. 142-157.[11201]

Sow, F. (2003): Fundamentalisms, globalisation and women’s human rights in Senegal, in: Gender and Development, 11, 1, pp. 69-76.[11202]

society - families marriages

Antoine, Philippe / Nanitelamio, Jeanne (1996): Can polygyny be avoided in Dakar, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.129-152.[8835]

Aubel, J. / Toure, I. / Diagne, M. (2004): Senegalese grandmothers promote improved maternal and child nutrition practices, The guardians of tradition are not avese to change, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 59, no. 5, pp. 945-959.[8836]

Aubel, Judi / Toure, Ibrahima / Diagne, Mamadou et al. (2001): Strengthening grandmother networks to improve community nutrition, Experience from Senegal, in: Gender and Development, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 62-73.[8837]

Bloch, Marianne N. (1988): The effect of seasonal maternal employment on young Senegalese children's behaviour, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 19, pp. 397-417.[8838]

Enel, Catherine / Pison, Gilles / Lefebvre, Monique (1994): Migration and marriage chance, A case study of Mlomp, A Joola village in Southern Senegal, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp. 92-116.[8839]

Garenne, Michael / van de Wall, Etienne (1989): Polygyny and fertility among the Serer of Senegal, in: Population Studies, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 41-59.[8840]

Horowitz, Michael M. (1993): River basin development policy, women and children, A case study from the Senegal Rifer Valley, in: Salem-Murdock, Muneera (ed.): Women and children first, Schenkman Books, Rochester, pp.317-338.[8841]

Jones, Hilary (2005): From `mariage a la mode' to weddings at town hall, Marriage, colonialism and mixed-race society in nineteenth-century Senegal, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 38, no.1, pp. 27-48.[8842]

Linares, Olga F. (1988): Kuseek and Kuriimen: Wives and kinswomen in Jola Society, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no.3, pp. 472-490.[8843]

Makward, Edris (1986): Marriage, tradition and women’s pursuit of happiness in the novels of Mariama Bâ. in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 271-181.[8844]

Reinwald, Brigitte (1995): Der Reichtum der Frauen, Leben und Arbeit der weiblichen Bevölkerung der Siin/Senegal unter dem Einfluß der französischen Kolonialisation, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg.[8845]

Reinwald, Brigitte (1997): Changing family strategies as a response to colonial challenge, Microanalytic observations on Siin/Senegal, 1890-1960, in: History of the Family, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 183-195.[8846]

Villalón, L.A. (1999): Generational changes, political stagnation, and the evolving dynamics of religion and political change in Senegal, in: Africa Today, 3, 4, pp. 129-147.[8847]

Whittemore, Robert D. / Beverly, E.A. (1996): Mandinka mothers and nurslings, Power and reproduction, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 45-62.[8848]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Baye, Babacar / Muhonja, Brillian (2019): Gender and sexuality in Senegalese societies, Critical perspectives and methods, Lexington Books, Lanham.[9071]

Baye´M , Babacar (2013): The origins of Senegalese homophobia, Discourses on homosexuals and transgender people in colonial and postcolonial Senegal, in: African Studies Review, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 109-128. [11767]

Niang, Cheik Ibrahima / Tapsoba, Placide et al. (2003): ‘It’s raining stones’, Stigma, violence and HIV vulnerability among men who have sex with men in Dakar, Senegal, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 5, no. 6, pp. 499-512.[9072]

Niang, Cheikh Ibrahima / Foley, Ellen / Diop, Ndack (2020): Colonial legacies, electoral politics, and the production of (anti)homosexuality in Senegal, in: Boyd, Lydia (ed.): Legislating gender and sexuality in Africa, Human rights, society and the state, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp.150-170.[9073]

Oudenhuijsen, Loes (2021): Quietly queer(ing), The normative value of sutura and its potential for young women in urban Senegal, in: Africa, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 434-452.[11690]

Swanson, Amy (2019): Ambiguous masculinities, Gender and sexual transgression in contemporary dance works by Senegalese men, in: Dance Research Journal, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 47-65.[9074]

Teunis, N. (2001): Same-sex sexuality in Africa, A case from Senegal, in: AIDS and Behavior, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 173-182.[9075]

society - masculinities

Van Eerdewijk, Anouka (2005): Being a man, Young masculinities and safe sex in Dakar, in: Davies, Tine / van Driel, Francien (eds.): The gender question of globalization, Changing perspectives and practices, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot, pp. 59-76.[9303]

society - migration and urbanisation

Bouya, A. (1997): The roles of women in urban-rural interaction, The case of Sokone in Senegal, in: Baker, J. (ed.): Rural-urban dynamics in francophone Africa, Nordiska Afrikainstitutet, Uppsala, pp. 90-103.[9728]

David, Rosalind / Niang, Khayri Omoul (1995): Case study Senegal, Focus on the compound, in: David, Rosaling (ed.): Changing places? Women, resource management and migration in the Sahel, SOS Sahel Publications, London, pp. 35-49.[9730]

David, Rosalind / Ruthven, Orlanda (1994): “Without their money we couldn’t stay any longer”, Effects of male out-migration on women’s management of natural resource base in Diourbel (Senegal), in: Grawert, Elke (Hg.): Wandern oder bleiben? Veränderungen der Lebenssituation von Frauen im Sahel durch die Arbeitsmigration der Männer, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 192-215.[9729]

Enel, Catherine / Pison, Gilles / Lefebvre, Monique (1994): Migration and marriage chance, A case study of Mlomp, A Joola village in Southern Senegal, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp. 92-116.[9731]

Evers Rosander, Eva (2000): Money, mortgage and religion, Senegalese women traders in Tenerife, Spain, in: Salter, Thomas / King, Kenneth (eds.): Africa, islam and development, islam and development in Africa--African islam, African development, Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, pp. 167-192.[9732]

Gadio, Coumba M. / Rakowski, Cathy A. (1995): Survival or empowerment? Crisis and temporary migration among the Serer millet pounders of Senegal, in: Women's Studies International Forum, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 431-443.[9733]

Lambert, Michael (2007): Politics, patriarchy, and new tradition, Understanding female migration among the Jola (Senegal), West Africa, in: Hahn, Hans Peter / Klute, Georg (eds.): Cultures of migration, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 129-148.[9734]

Margadio, Coumba / Rakowski, Cathy (1995): Survival or empowerment? Crisis and temporary migration among the Serer millet pounders of Senegal, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 431-443.[9735]

society - women's organisations

Rosander, Eva Evers (1997): Women in groups in Africa, Female assoicational patterns in Senegal and Morocco, in: Chatty, Cawn / Rabo, Annika (eds.): Organizing women, Formal and informal women’s groups in the Middle East, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp.101-123.[10059]

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