Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Nigeria

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Abdullah, Hussaina / Hamza, Ibrahim (2003): Women and land in Northern Nigeria, The need for independent ownership, in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land rights in Africa, Culture, religion and realizing women’s rights, Zed Books, London, pp.133-175.[761]

Achebe, Nwando (2005): Farmers, traders, warriors, and kings: Female power and authority in Northern Igboland, 1900-1960, Heinemann, Portsmouth.[762]

Adedokun, Olaide / Akande, Oyetuni / Carim, Adeola / Nelson-Twakor, Nancy (2000): Economic liberalisation and women in the informal sector in rural Nigeria, in: Tsikata, Dzodozi / Kerr, Joanna (eds.): Demanding dignity, Economic reforms in Africa, Publications of the North South Institute, Ottawa, pp.181-198.[763]

Adekanye, Tomilayo (1984): Women in agriculture in Nigeria: Problems and prospects for development, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 7, no. 6, pp.423-431.[764]

Adekanye, Tomilayo (1985): Innovation and rural women in Nigeria: Cassava processing and food production, in: Ahmed, Iftikhar (ed.): Technology and rural women: Conceptual and empirical issues, George Allen and Unwin, London, pp.252-283.[765]

Adelmola, Ade (1994): Women farmers in Ondo State, Nigeria, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 50, pp.311-326.[766]

Adeyemo, Remi (1984): Women in rural areas, A case study of Southwestern Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 3, pp.563-572.[767]

Ajaero, J.P. / Imoh, A.N. (2007): Rural women’s involvement in dry season vegetable production and marketing in Ezinihitte local government area of Imo State, Nigeria, in: Global Approaches to Extension Practices, vol. 3, no. 2, pp.9-14.[768]

Ajayi, A.O. / Farinde, A.J. / Laogun, E.A. (2003): Women farmers training needs and their correlates for effective extension programme and poverty reduction in Oyo State of Nigeria, in: Journal of Extension Systems, vol. 19, no. 1, pp.91-102.[769]

Ajayi, Samuel (1997): Women in agriculture as a strategy for food security in Nigeria, in: Journal of Rural Development and Administration, vol. 29, no. 4, pp.11-17.[770]

Ajieh, P.C. / Uzokwe, U.N. (2007): Adoption of cassava production technologies among women farmers in Aniocha South Local Government Area (Lgl), Delta State, Nigeria, in: Global Approaches to Extension Practices, vol. 3, no. 2, pp.15-22.[771]

Akande, Jadesola (1984): Participation of women in rural development (Nigeria), in: ILO (ed.): Rural development and women in Africa, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp.129-136.[772]

Akande, M. (1992): Enhancing the performance of women’s multiple roles: A case study of Isonya rural development project, Ile Ife, Nigeria, in: Community Development Journal, vol. 27, no. 1, pp.60-68.[773]

Akanji, Bola (2001): Traded and non-traded commodities in Nigeria’s “traditional agriculture”, in: Webb, Patrick / Weinberger, Katinka (eds.): Women farmers, Enhancing rights, recognition and productivity, Peter Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., pp.73-90.[774]

Anyakoha, Elizabeth / Ozoh, Rosemary (1999): Environmental awareness of rural Nigerian women in Enugu State through appropriate agricultural extension programs, African Rural Social Sciences Research Networks, Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, Issues in African Rural Development Monograph Series no. 13, Arlington.[775]

Aromolaran, Adebayo (2004): Household income, women’s income share and food calorie intake in South Western Nigeria, in: Food Policy, vol. 29, pp.507-530.[776]

Ay, Peter (1990): Women in food processing, Traditional palm oil production and changes through the introduction of appropriate technology, Book Builders Publications, Ibadan.[777]

Azikiwe, Uche (1992): Non-formal education programme for rural women in Nigeria, in: Nigerian Journal of Rural and Community Development, vol. 4, no. 2, pp.82-91.[778]

Babalola, O. / Dennis, Carolyne (1988): Returns to women’s labour in cash-crop production: Tobacco in Igboho, Oyo State, Nigeria, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, women and land, The African experience, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.79-89.[779]

Berry, Sara (1975): Cocoa, custom, and socio-economic change in rural Western Nigeria, Claredon Press, Oxford.[780]

Blumberg, Rae (1988): Gender stratification, economic development and the African food crisis: Paradigm and praxis in Nigeria, in: Riley, Matilda W. (ed.): Social structures and human lives, Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, pp.115-137.[781]

Buhl, S. (1993): Die hauswirtschaftliche Arbeit der Hausa-Frauen in Nigeria, in: Fachbereich internationale Agrarentwicklung der TU-Berlin (Hg.): Sozio-ökonomische Analyse von bäuerlichen Familienwirtschaften im Sahel unter besonderer Berücksichtigung des Arbeitsbereichs der Frau, Materialienband zu Betrieb und Haushalt - Theorie und Empirie, TU Berlin, pp.85-92.[782]

Burfisher, Mary E. / Horenstein, Nadine (1985): Sex roles in the Nigerian Tiv farm household, Women's roles and gender differences in development, Cases for planners, Kumarian Press, West Hartford. (and in Rural Africana, no. 21, 1985, pp.31-49.)[783]

Chikwendu, D.O. / Arokoyo, J.O. (1997): Women and sustainable agriculture in Nigeria, in: Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, vol. 11, no. 1, pp.53-69.[784]

Chuku, Gloria (1995): Women in the economy of Igboland, 1900-1970: A survey, in: African Economic History, vol. 23, pp.37-50.[785]

Damisa, M.A. / Yohanna, M. (2007): Role of rural women in farm management decision making process, Ordered probit analysis, in: World Journal of Agricultural Sciences, vol. 3, no. 4, pp.543-546.[786]

Deji, Olanike (2011): Gender and rural development, vol. 1 and 2, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[787]

Eboh, E.C. (1992): Gender impact and role dynamics in a rural cash crop economy: The case of palm produce in Arondizuogu villages of Imo State, Nigeria, in: Beitrage zur Tropischen Landwirtschaft und Vetrinärmedizin, vol. 30, pp.347-355.[788]

Eboh, E.C. (1993): A household survey of farm women's access to agro-information and technology: Implications for extension training and rural development in Nigeria, in: Journal of Rural Development and Administration, vol. 25, no. 4, pp.1-22.[789]

Elabor-Idemudia,Patience (1991): The impact of structural adjustment programs on women and their households in Bendel and Ogun-State, Nigeria, in: Gladwin, Christine (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women’s farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp.128-150.[790]

Elabor-Idemudia,Patience (1994): Nigeria, Agricultural exports and contemporary schemes - Rural women’s production resources and quality of life, in: Starr, Pamela (ed.): Mortgaging women’s lives - feminist critique of structural adjustment, Zed Books, London, pp.134-164.[791]

Ezumah, Nkoli / Di Domenico, Catherine (1995): Enhancing the role of women in crop production: A case study of Igbo women in Nigeria, in: World Development, vol.23, no. 10, pp.1731-1744.[792]

Famoriyo, Segun (1988): The significance of women in Nigerian agriculture, in: African Notes, 3, pp.83-88.[793]

Gabriel, Amakievi (1994): A better life program for rural women in a developing nation, in: James, Valentine Udho (ed.): Environmental and economic dilemmas of developing countries, Africa in the twenty-first century, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp.197-215.[794]

Gabriel, Amakievi / Ikein, Augustine (1995): Agrarian women and textile industry in Nigeria, in: James, Valentine Udoh (ed.): Women and sustainable development in Africa, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp.159-170.[795]

Grant, Bisi / Anthonio, Q.B.O. (1973): Women’s cooperatives in the Western State of Nigeria, in: Bulletin of Rural Economics and Sociology, vol. 8, no. 3, pp.7-35.[796]

Guyer, Jane (1980): Food, cocoa, and the division of labour by sex in two West African societies, in: Comparative Studies on Society and History, vol. 22, no. 3, pp.355-373.[797]

Guyer, Jane (1995): Women’s farming and present ethnography: Perspectives on a Nigerian restudy, in: Bryceson, Deborah Fahy (ed.): Women wielding the hoe, Lessons from rural Africa for feminist theory and development practice, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp.25-45.[798]

Guyer, Jane / Idowu, Olukemi (1991): Women’s agricultural work in a multimodal rural economy, Ibarapoa District, Oyo State, Nigeria, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and transformation: Impacts on African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp.257-280.[799]

Ibekwe, U.C. / Ibekwe, U.C (2007): Rural women’s attitude towards adoption of improved crop production practices in Aguata Agricultural Zone, Anambra State, Nigeria, in: Global Approaches to Extension Practice, vol. 3, no. 2, pp.50-54.[800]

Idowu, Olukemi / Guyer, Jane (1993): Commercialization and the harvest work of women Ibarapa, Oyo State, Nigeria, Working Paper, No. 172, African Studies Centre, Boston University, Boston.[801]

Ilika, Amobi Linus (2005): Women’s perception of partner violence in a rural Igbo community, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp.77-88.[802]

Ilika, Amobi Linus / Igwegbe, Anthony (2004): Unintended pregnancy among unmarried adolescents and young women in Anambra Staate, South Eastern Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 3, pp.91-102.[803]

Izugbara, C. O. / Ukwayi, J.K. (2002): Conceptual issues in Nigeria’s gender specific rural poverty alleviation strategy, in: Development in Practice, vol. 12, no. 1, pp.81-85.[806]

Izugbara, Cimaraoke Otutubikey (2003): The cultural context of geophagy among pregnant and lactating Ngwa women of southeastern Nigeria, in: African Anthropologist, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 180-199.[804]

Izugbara, Cimaraoke Otutubikey (2004): Gendered micro-lending schemes and sustainable women’s empowerment in Nigeria, in: Community Development Journal, vol. 39, no. 1, pp.72-84.[805]

Jackson, Cecile (1984): The Kano River irrigation project, Kumarian Press, West Hartford.[807]

Janelid, Ingrid (1975): The role of women in Nigerian agriculture, FAO Publications, Rome.[808]

Kaul, R.N. (1992): Gender issues in farming, Selected case studies in development and extension of farm and other equipment to women in Northern Nigeria, in: Journal of Farming Systems Research and Extension, vol. 3, no. 2, pp.25-38.[809]

Korieh, Chima J. (2001): The invisible farmer? Women, gender, and colonial agricultural policy in the Igbo region of Nigeria, c. 1913-1954, in: African Economic History, no. 29, pp.117-162.[810]

Korieh, Chima J. (2010): The land has changed, History, society and gender and in colonial Eastern Nigeria, University of Calgary Press, Calgary.[811]

Ladebo, Olubgenga Jelil (2004): Agricultural trainees’ and extension personnel’s attitude toward HIV/AIDS, Implications for extension service delivery in Nigeria, in: Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, vol. 10, no. 1, pp.13-22.[812]

Ladipo, Patricia (1981): Developing women’s co-operatives: An experiment in rural Nigeria, in: Nelson, Nici (ed.): African women in the development process, London, pp.123-136.[813]

Ladipo, Patricia (1989): Women in a maize storage co-operative in Nigeria - Family planning, credit and technological change, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa, James Currey Publishers, London, pp.101-117.[814]

Longe, Oyebiodun (1988): The role of women in food production, processing and preservation in Nigeria, in: African Notes, 3, pp.27-35.[815]

Longhurst, Richard (1982): Resource allocation and the sexual division of labour: A case study of a Moslem rural Hausa village in Northern Nigeria, in: Beneria, Lourdes (ed.): The sexual division of labour in rural societies, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp.95-116.[816]

Longhurst, Richard (1984): Rural development planning and the sexual division of labour: A case study of a Moslem Hausa village in Northern Nigeria, in: ILO (ed.): Rural development and women in Africa, ILO Publications, Geneva, pp.117-122.[817]

Martin, Susan (1984): Gender and innovation: Farming, cooking and palm processing in Ngwa region, South Eastern Nigeria, 1900-1930, in: Journal of African History, vol. 25, pp.411-427.[818]

Mbanyiman, Esther Susuyu (1998): Agricultural opportunities and constraints in rural Nigeria: A gender perspective, in: Apt, Nana Araba / Agyemang-Mensah, Naana / Grieco, Margaret (eds.): Maintaining the momentum of Beijing, The contribution of African gender NGOs, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot, pp.170-183.[819]

Mbata, J.N. / Amadi, C.J. (1990): The role of women in traditional agriculture: A case study of women in food crop production in River States, Nigeria, in. Ahfad Journal, 7, 1, pp.32-50. (und in Discovery and Innovation, vol. 5, no. 1, 1993, pp. 81-87).[820]

Mgbada, J.U. (2007): Socio-cultural factors hindering adoption of technologies by women in-agriculture-farmers in Enugu State, Nigeria, in: International Journal of Agriculture and Development, vol. 9, pp.48-54.[821]

Nwachukwu, E.O. (2005): Gender sensitivity in agricultural extension services in Imo State: Issues and challenges, in: Global Approaches to Extension Practice, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 83-90.[822]

Nwomonoh, J.N. (1994): The role of African women in rural development: The Nigerian case, in: James, Valentine (ed.): Environmental and economic dilemmas of developing countries: Africa in the Twenty-First Century, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp.159-169.[823]

Odurukwe, N. / Asiabaka, C. / Ugwoke, F.O. / Ehirim, N.C. / Ejiogu-Okereke, E.N. (2007): The role of women’s organizations in community development, A case study of Orlu agricultural zone, Imo State, in: International Journal of Agriculture and Development, vol. 9, pp.85-91.[824]

Ogunleye, Bisi (1995): Frauen ernähren das Land, in: Randzio-Plath, Christa / Mangold-Wegner, Sigrid (Hg.): Frauen im Süden, Ihre Armut, unser Reichtum, Dietz-Verlag, Bonn, pp.90-95.[825]

Ogunwale, S.A. / Hassan, D.A. (1993): Women's roles and integration into agricultural and rural development practice in Nigeria, in: Social Development Issues, vol. 15, no. 1, pp.63-72.[826]

Ojo, Olatunji (2002): More than farmers' wives: Yoruba women and cash crop production, c. 1920-1957, in: Falola, Toyin / Oyebade, Adebayo (eds.): The transformation of Nigeria: Essays in honor of Toyin Falola, Africa World Press, Trenton. [827]

Ojo, Olatunji (2002): Writing Yoruba Female Farmers Into History: A Study of the Food Production Sector, in: Falola, Toyin and Jennings, Christian (eds.). Africanizing Knowledge: African Studies Acriss the Disciplines. Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick, New Jersey/London. [828]

Okojie, Christina (1991): Achieving self reliance in food production in Nigeria: Maximising the contribution of rural women, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 6, no. 2, pp.33-52.[829]

Okojie, Christina (2000): Women in the rural economy in Nigeria, in: Ghorayshi, Parvin / Belanger, Clarie (eds.): Women, work and gender relations in developing countries, A global perspective, Greenwood Press, London, pp.57-74.[830]

Okonje, Kamene (1976): Rural women’s credit system, A Nigerian example, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 10, no. 11, pp.326-330.[831]

Okonje, Kamene (1989): Rural development in Nigeria, How do women count? in: Africana Marburgensia, 22, pp.31-51.[832]

Okorji, Eugene C. (1985): The role of women in arable cropping enterprises in farming communities of south-eastern Nigeria: A case study, in: Development and Peace, vol. 6, no. 2, pp.165-173.[833]

Okorji, Eugene C. (1988): Women and rural development, Strategies for sustaining women’s contribution in rural households of Anambra State, Nigeria, Working Paper, no. 166, Women and International Development, Michigan State University, East Lansing.[834]

Okorji, Eugene C. (1988): Traditional sex-related household roles as determinants of income distribution: A case study of arable farming communities in Anambra State, Nigeria, in: Tropical Agriculture, vol. 65, no. 1, pp.89-95.[835]

Oloruntoba, Abayomi (2006): Gender and research attainment in Nigerian agricultural universities, in: Journal of Higher Education in Africa, vol. 4, no. 2, pp.83-98.[837]

Olurode, Lai (1995): Women in rural-urban migration in the town of Iwo in Nigeria, in: Baker, Jonathan / Akin Aina, Tade (eds.): The migration experience in Africa, Uppsala Unversity Press, Uppsala, pp.289-302.[836]

Onemolease, Eddy (2002): Extension needs of women cassava farmers in Igueben and Esan Northeast local government areas of Edo State, in: Africa Development, vol. 27, no. 1/2, pp.116-126.[838]

Onemolease, Eddy / Aghanenu, A.S. (2002): Bridging farmers knowledge and practice of modern farming technologies, A case study of women farmers in Nigeria, in: Journal of Extension Systems, vol. 18, no. 1, pp.116-125.[839]

Onyishi, Jonathan (2004): Eradicating poverty through women’s participation in adult and non-formal education, A study of Nsukka in Enugu State of Nigeria, in: Adult Education and Development, vol. 62, pp.25-32.[840]

Opeke, Ola (1991): Sex-roles in the adoption of agricultural innovation among Yoruba women in Nigeria, A case study, in: African Journal of Agricultural Sciences, vol. 15, no. 1-2. S.111-117.[841]

Osagie, Joseph (2000): Esan women, agriculture and colonial rule, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic History, no. 3, pp.16-32.[842]

Osunde, A.U. / Omoruyi, F.E.O. (1999): An assessment of the factors militating against the active participation of rural women in development oriented education programms in Midwestern Nigeria, in: Adult Education and Development, vol. 52, pp. 81-87.[843]

Peterman, Amber et al. (2011): Understanding the complexities surronding gender differences in agricultural productivity in Nigeria and Uganda, in: Journal of Development Studies, vol. 47, no. 10, pp.1482-1509.[844]

Rahji, M.A.Y. / Falusi, A.O. (2001): Gender productivity differential and returns to schooling of farm households in South Western Nigeria, in: Nigerian Agricultural Development Studies, vol. 2, no. 1, pp.15-23.[845]

Rahji, M.A.Y. / Falusi, A.O. (2005): A gender analysis of farm households labour use and its impact on household income in southwestern Nigeria, in: Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, vol. 44, pp.155-166.[846]

Sabo, Elizabeth (2006): Participatory assessment of the impact of women in agriculture programme of Borno State, Nigeria, in: Journal of Tropical Agriculture, vol. 44, no. 1-2, pp.52-56.[847]

Soetan, Funmi (1997): Female loan beneficaries in an situational credit program: The case of community banks in South Western Nigeria, in: Altmann, Uta /Teherani-Krönner, Parto (Hg.): What have women’s projects accomplished so far? Publikationen der Humboldt Universität Berlin, Berlin, pp.222-238.[848]

Soetan, Funmi (1999): Women and the environment: Women farmer’s utilization of environmental resources and sustainability practices in rural South Western Nigeria, in: Teherani-Krönner, Parto / Hoffmann-Altmann, Uta / Schultz, Ulrike (Hg.): Frauen und nachhaltige ländliche Entwicklung, Beiträge der III. internationalen Tagung „Frauen in der ländlichen Entwicklung“, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler, pp.119-133.[849]

Spiro, Helen (1987): Women farmers and traders in Oyo state, Nigeria, A case study on their changing roles, in: Momsen, Janet Henshell / Townsend, Janet (eds.): Geography of gender in the third world, Routledge Publications, London, pp.173-191.[850]

Stone, Glenn Davis (1988): Women doing well, A restudy of Nigerian Kofyar, in: Research in Economic Anthropology, vol. 10, pp.287-306.[851]

Stone, Priscilla / Stone, Gleen Dais / Mc Netting, Robert (1995): The sexual division of labour in Kofyar agriculture, in: American Ethnologist, 22, 1, pp.165-186.[852]

Stone, Priscilla / Stone, Glenn Davis (2000): Kofyar women who get ahead, Incentives for agricultural commercialisation in Nigeria, in: Spring, Anita (ed.): Women farmers and commercial ventures, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp.153-170.[853]

Tarfa, Sintiki (1999): Why rural technologies fail to meet the needs of Nigerian women: Evidence from Hausa women’s groups in Kano State, Nigeria, in: Afshar, Haleh (ed.): Women, globalisation and fragmentation in the developing world, St. Martin Press, New York, pp.215-225.[855]

Thomas-Emeagwali, Gloria (1991): Perspectives on women and the development of agricultural cooperatives in Nigeria, in: Suliman, Mohamed (ed.): Alternative development strategies for Africa, Institute for African Alternatives Publications, London, pp.148-155.[856]

Timothy, Awoyemi Taiwo et al. (2006): Gender inequalities and economic efficiency, New evidence from cassava-based farm holdings in rural south-western Nigeria, in: African Development Review, vol. 18, no. 3, pp.428-443.[854]

Trager, Lillian (1995): Women migrants and rural-urban linkages in South-Western Nigeria, in: Baker, Jonathan / Akin Aina, Tade (eds.): The migration experience in Africa, Uppsala Unversity Press, Uppsala, pp.269-288.[857]

Trager, Lillian / Osinulu, Clara (1991): New women’s organizations in Nigeria: One response to structural adjustment, in: Gladwin, Christine (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women’s farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp.339-358.[858]

Waters-Bayer, Ann (1994): Soybean daddawa: An innovation by Nigerian women, in: ILEIA Newsletter, vol. 4, no. 3, pp.8-9.[859]

Watts, Susan (1984): Rural women as food processors and traders: Eko making in the Ilorin area in Nigeria, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 19, pp.71-82.[860]

Williams, C.E. (1979): The role of women in cassava processing in Nigeria, in: Pluckett, Donald (ed.): Small Scale Processing of Tropical Root Crops, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.340-353.[861]

Williams, C.E. (1982): The effects of technological innovation among rural women in Nigeria: A case study of „gari“ processing in selected villages of Bendel State, Nigeria, in: Journal of Rural Development, vol. 5, pp.247-257.[862]

Zdunnek, Gabriele / Ay, Peter (1999): Food production, transformation processes and change of gender-specific division of labour in rural Africa, in: Kracht, Uwe / Schulz, Manfred (eds.): Food security and nutrition, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp.219-236.[863]

arts and culture

Azuonye, Chukwuma (1997): Power, marginality and womenbeing in Igbo oral narratives, in: Granquistraou, L. / Inyama, Nnadozie (eds.): Power and powerlessness of women in West African orality, Umea, pp. 1-31.[1505]

Barber, Karin (1990): Oríkì, women and the proliferation and merging of the oriisa, in: Africa, 60, 3, pp. 313-337.[1506]

Barber, Karin (1991): I could speak until tomorrow: Oriki, women and the past in a Yoruba town, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.[1507]

Barber, Karin (1994): Polyvocality and the individual talent, Three women Oriki Singers, in: Abiodun, Rowland / Drewal, Henry J. / Pemberton, John (eds.): The Yoruba artist, New theoretical perspectives on African art, Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, pp. 151-160.[1508]

Beik, Janet (1987): Women’s roles in contemporary Hausa theatre of Niger, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 232-244.[1509]

Bivins, Mary (1997): Daura and gender in the creation of a Hausa national epic, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-28.[1510]

Boyd, Jean / Mack, Beverly (1996): Women's Islamic literature in Northern Nigeria, 150 years of tradition, in: Harrow, Kenneth W. (ed.): The marabout and the muse: New aspects of Islam in African literature, Heinemann, Portsmouth. [1511]

Boyd, Jean / Mack, Beverly (1997): Collected works of Nana Asmaù, Daughter of Usman dan Fodio (1793-1864), University of Michigan Press, East Lansing.[1512]

Cooper, Barbara (2001): The strength in the song, Muslim personhood, audible capital, and Hausa women’s performance of the Hajj, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Gendered modernities, Ethnographic perspectives, Palgrave Publications, New York, pp. 79-104.[1513]

Drewal, Henry (1968): Art and the perception of women in Yoruba culture, in: Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 545-567.[1514]

Drewal, Henry (1988): Mermaids, mirrors and snake charmers, Igbo Mammi Water shrines, in: African Arts, vol. XXI, no. 2, pp. 38-45.[1515]

Drewal, Henry (1988): Performing the other, Mammy Water worship in West Africa, in: Drama Review, 118, pp. 160-185.[1516]

Drewal, Henry John / Drewal, Margaret Thompson (1983): Gelede, Art and female power among the Yoruba, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[1517]

Dunton, Chris (2002): Contemporary Nigerian theatre, The plays of Stella Oyedepo, in: Banham, Martin / Gibbs, James / Osofisan, Femi (eds.): African theatre, Women, James Currey, London, pp. 99-108.[1518]

Gillow, John (2003): Nigerian woman's vertical looms, in: Gillow, John. African textiles: Colour and creativity across a continent, Thames and Hudson, London, pp. 56-59.[1519]

Kalu, Anthonia (1999): Women and development in West Africa: Traditional views in contemporary literature, in: James, Valentine / Etim, James S. (eds.): The feminization of development processees in Africa: Current and future perspectives Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 199-214.[1524]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1993): Iyoba, the Queen Mother of Benin: Images and ambiguity in gender and sex roles in Court Art, in: Art History, vol. 16, pp. 386-407.[1520]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1993): Images of the Queen Mother in Benin Court Art, in: African Arts, vol. 26, no. 3 pp. 54-63.[1521]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): In splendor and seclusion, Art and royal women at the court of Benin, Nigeria, Thames and Hudson, Lodon.[1522]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): Iyoba, The Queen Mother of Benin, Images and ambiguity in gender and sex roles in court art, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 73-102.[1523]

Kassam, Margaret Hauwa (1996): Some aspects of women’s voices from Northern Nigeria, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 111-125.[1525]

LaDuke, Betty (1991): Nike Davies: Nigerian batik artist, in: LaDuke, Betty: Africa through the eyes of women artists, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 33-40[1526]

LaDuke, Betty (1991): Princess Elizabeth Olowu: Nigerian sculptor, in: LaDuke, Betty: Africa through the eyes of women artists, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 21-32.[1527]

Lawal, Babatunde (1996): The Gelede spectacle, Art, gender and social harmony in an African culture, University of Washington Press, Seattle.[1528]

Lawuyi, Olatunde / Olupuna, Jacob (1987): Making sense of the Aje festival, Wealth politics and the status of women among the Ondo of Southwestern Nigeria, in: Journal of Ritual Studies, vol. 1, pp. 97-102.[1529]

Layiwola, A. (1997): Gender tempered through metal: Women in metal-casting in Benin City, Nigeria, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 191-197.[1530]

Lopasic, Alexander (1997): Gender and traditional village art in Benin Province, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 425-442.[1531]

MacIain, Adrienne (2007): Let us be united in purpose, Variations on gender relations in the Yorùbá theatre, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 108-124.[1532]

Mack, Beverly (1983): ‘Waka daya ba ta kare nika’, one song will not finish the grinding, Hausa women’s oral literature, in: Wylie, Hal (ed.): Contemporary African literature, Three Continents Press, Washington, D.C., pp. 15-46.[1533]

Mack, Beverly (1986): Songs from silence, Hausa women’s poetry, in: Davies Boyce, Carole / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika, Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, New Jersey, pp. 181-190.[1534]

Obafemi, Olu (1994): Towards feminist aesthetics in Nigerian drama: The plays of Tess Onwueme, in: African Literature Today, vol. 19, pp. 84-100.[1535]

Odugbesan, Clara (1969): Femininity in Yoruba religious art, in: Douglas, Mary / Kaberry, Phyllis (esd.): Man in Africa, London, pp. 199-211.[1536]

Olaoba, O.B. (2002): The female factor in Yoruba traditional festivals, in: Humanities Review Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 21-31.[1537]

Oluwole, Sophie (2001): Womanhood in Yoruba traditional thought, in: Ogundele, Wole / Obafemi / Abodunrin, Femi (eds.): Character is beauty: Redefining Yoruba culture and identity (Iwalewa-Haus, 1981-1996), Africa World Press, Trenton.[1538]

Omari-Obayemi, Mikelle (1996): An indigenous anatomy of power and art, A new look at Yoruba women in society and religion, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 21, pp. 89-98.[1539]

Opefeyitimi, Ayo (1998): Myths and women of power in Yoruba orature, in: Kolawole, Mary E.M. (ed.): Gender perceptions and development in Africa, Arabon Academic Publishers, Lagos.[1540]

Ottenberg, Simon (1997): Ada Udechukwu: Poetic and personal lines, in: Ottenberg, Simon. New Traditions From Nigeria: Seven Artists of the Nsukka Group. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. pp. 203-221.[1541]

Oyelola, Pat (1992): The beautiful and the useful: The contribution of Yoruba women to indigo-dyed textiles, in: Nigerian Field, vol. 57, 1-2, pp. 61-66.[1542]

economy - formal and informal employment

Abdullah, Hussaina (1997): Multiple identities and multiple organizing strategies of female wage workers in Kano’s manufacturing sector, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 54-68.[1708]

Andrae, Gunilla (1997): A women worker in a Lagos factory, Her power base in family, community, labour market, and union, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women`s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 69-84.[1709]

Anugwom, Edlyne (2011): ‘Wetin we for do?’ Women entrepreneurs and the Niger Delta Conflict, in: Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, vol. 24, no.2, pp. 49-56.[1710]

Byfield, Judith (2002): The bluest hands, A social and economic history of women dryers in Abeokuta (Nigeria), 1890-1940, James Currey, London.[1711]

Cooper, Barbara (1993): Cloth, commodity production and social capital: Women in Maradi, Niger, 1890-1989, in: African Economic History, vol. 21, pp. 51-71.[1712]

Dennis, Carolyne (1984): Capitalist development and women’s work, A Nigerian case study, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 27/28, pp. 109-119.[1713]

Dennis, Carolyne (1987): Women and the state in Nigeria: The case of the Federal Military Government 1984-85, in: Haleh, Afshar (ed.): Women, state and ideology, Suny Press, London, pp. 13-27.[1714]

Dennis, Carolyne (1991): Constructing a ‘career’ under conditions of economic crisis and structural adjustment: The survival strategies of Nigerian women, in: Afshar, Haleh (ed.): Women, development and survival in the Third World, Longman Publishers, London, New York, pp. 88-106.[1715]

Dennis, Carolyne (1991): The concept of career in Nigeria, Individual perceptions of the relationship between the formal and the informal sector, in: Elson, D. (ed.): Male bias in development planning, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp. 175-201.[1716]

Denzer, La Ray (1989): Women in government service in colonial Nigeria, 1862-1945, Working Papers, no. 136, African Studies Centre, Boston.[1717]

Di Domenico, Catherine (1977): Occupational status of women in Nigeria, Comparison of two urban centres, in: Africana Marburgensia, vol. 10, pp. 62-79.[1718]

Elabor-Idemudia, Patience (1991): The impact of structural adjustment programs on women and their households in Bendel and Ogun State, Nigeria, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 128-139.[1719]

Elabor-Idemudia, Patience (2003): Race and gender analyses of trafficking: A case study of Nigeria, in: Canadian Woman Studies, vol. 22, no. 3-4, pp. 116-123[1720]

Gabriel, Amakievi / Ikein, Augustine (1995): Agrarian women and textile industry in Nigeria, in: James, Valentine Udoh (ed.): Women and sustainable development in Africa, London, pp. 159-170.[1721]

Garba, Kassey (1999): Structural adjustment, budget structure, and women’s share of employment in Nigeria’s federal civil service, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41, no. 1.[1722]

Lawuyi, Olatunde (1990): Education, mobility and gender within the Nigerian informal economy, The domestic service example, in: Sociologus, vol. 40, pp. 39-53.[1723]

Lindsay, Lisa (1999): Domesticity and difference, Male breadwinners, working women and colonial citizenship in the 1945 Nigerian strike, in: American Historical Review, vol.104, no. 3, pp. 783-812.[1724]

Lindsay, Lisa (2003): Working with gender, Wage labour and social change in Southwestern Nigeria, Heinemann, Porthmouth.[1725]

Lindsay, Lisa (2007): Working with gender, The emergence of the ‘male breadwinner’ in colonial Southwestern Nigeria, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 241-252.[1726]

Malami, Hussaini (1996): The unaccounted contribution of Nigerian women to the national economy, in: Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, vol. 16, pp. 279-286.[1727]

Meagher, Kate (2000): Veiled conflicts: Peasant differentiation, gender and sructural ajustment in Nigerian Hausaland, in: ryceson, Deborah / ristobal, Kay / Mooij, Jos (eds.):Disappearing peasantries? Rural labour in Africa, Asia and Latin America, Intermediate Technology Publications, London, pp. 81-98.[1728]

Nmadu, Teresa (2000): Female labour participation in manufacturing firms in Jos Metropolis, in: Nigerian Journal of Gender and Development, vol. 1, no. 1-2, pp. 117-123.[1729]

Okeke, Philomena (1997): Female wage earners and separate resource structures in post oil boom Nigeria, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 22, pp. 373-387.[1730]

Okeke, Philomena (2001): Negotiating social independence, The challenges of carrer pursuits for Igbo women in postcolonial Nigeria, in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 234-251.[1731]

Okeke, Philomena (2004): Negotiating power and privilege: Igbo career women in Contemporary Nigeria, Ohio University Press, Athens.[1732]

Okojie, Christina (1984): Female migrants in the urban labour market: Benin City, Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 3, pp. 547-562.[1733]

Okonkwo, I.C. (1994): Integrating women into the Nigerian economic mainstream: The case of entrepreneurship education, in: Journal of Education and Social Change, vol. 7, no. 4-5, pp. 78-90.[1735]

Okpala, Amon (1989): Female employment and family size among urban Nigeria women, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 439-456.[1734]

Olojede, Iyabo (1994): Women's access to the Nigerian higher civil service: Problems and prospects, in: African Administrative Studies, vol. 43, pp. 1-13.[1736]

Olukoshi, Adebayo / Olukoshi, Hussainatu (1995): Structural adjustment and female wage labor in the Nigerian textile industry, in: Thomas-Emeagwali, Gloria (ed.): Women pay the price: Structural adjustment in Africa and the Caribbean, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 39-51. (and published in: Structural adjustment and female wage labour in the Nigerian textile industry, in: Zeitschrift für Afrikastudien, Nr. 4, 1989, pp. 25-36.)[1737]

Omar, O. / Ogenyi, V. (2004): A qualitative evaluation of women as managers in the Nigerian civil service, in: International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 17, pp. 360-373.[1738]

Omorodion, Francisca (2004): The impact of petroleum refinery on the economic livelihoods of women in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria, in: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, vol.6.[1739]

Onyejekwe, Chineze (2005): Influences of global human trafficking issues on Nigeria, A gender perspective, in: Journal of International Women’s Studies, vol. 7, pp. 141-151.[1741]

Onyeonoru, Ifeanyi (2004): Pull factors in the political economy of international commercial sex work in Nigeria, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 115-135.[1740]

Osirim, Mary (1992): Gender and entrepreneurship: Issues of capital and technology in Nigerian firms, in: Ahere, A. / Katz, Bernhard (eds.): Privatization and investment in Sub-Saharan Africa, Routledge Publications, New York, pp. 213-248.[1742]

Osirim, Mary (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146.[1743]

Osiruemu, Edith (2004): Women in the trade union movement in Nigeria, The constraints, in: Jenda, vol. 6.[1744]

Parpart, Jane (1990): Wage earning women and the double day: The Nigerian case, in: Stichter, Sharon / Parpart, Jane L. (eds.): Women, employment and the family in the international division of labour, Macmillan Publishers, Basingstoke, pp. 161-182.[1745]

Pittin, Rene (1984): Gender and class in a Nigerian industrial setting, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 31, pp. 67-83.[1746]

Pittin, Rene (1987): Documentation of women’s work in Nigeria: Problems and solutions, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa: Policy related studies on work and demographic issues, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth, pp. 25-44.[1747]

Pittin, Rene (1991): Women, work and ideology in Nigeria, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 52, pp. 38-52.[1748]

Pittin, Rene (2003): Women and work in Northern Africa, Transcending boundaries, Palgrave Publications, London.[1749]

Rouse-Amadi, Hilary (1994): Servicing mankind: Women and domestic labour in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, in: Turner, Terisa (ed.): Arise y mighty people! Gender, class and race in popular struggle, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 161-177.[1750]

Seibel, H.R. (1969): Die Afrikanerin in Beruf und Familie, Eine Untersuchung bei nigerianischen Industriearbeiterinnen, Freiburg.[1751]

Werthmann, Katja (1998): Handel, Handwerk, Herumsitzen, Arbeit und Statusproduktion bei muslimischen Frauen in Nord-Nigeria, in: Schmidt, Heike / Wirz, Albert (Hg.): Afrika und das Andere, Alterität und Innovation, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 94-102.[1752]

Willer, Heidi (1995): Women industrialists - A potential for economic development in Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 99-134.[1753]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1988): Strukturanpassung - ein Ausweg aus der Krise? Auswirkungen der Strukturanpassungspolitik auf die Situation von Frauen in nigerianischen Städten, in: Beiträge zur feministischen Theorie und Praxis, Heft 23, pp. 65-75.[1754]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1990): Tendenzen struktureller Veränderungen im informellen Sektor am Beispiel von Frauenarbeitsbereichen in Ibadan (Nigeria), in: Boehm, Ulrich / Kappek, Robert (Hg.): Kleinbetriebe des informellen Sektors und Ausbildung im subsaharischen Afrika, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg, pp. 55-68.[1755]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1995): Research on gender relations with reference to Ghana and Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 135-151.[1756]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1997): Strukturanpassung und geschlechtsspezifische Differenzierungen am Beispiel Nigerias und Ghanas, in: Braig, Marianne (Hg.): Begegnungen und Einmischungen, Akademischer Verlag, Stuttgart, pp. 147-164.[1757]

economy - Households

Aromolaran, Adebayo (2004): Household income, women’s income share and food calorie intake in South Western Nigeria, in: Food Policy, vol. 29, pp. 507-530.[1977]

Awe, Bolanle / Ezumah, Nkoli N (199): The impact of structural adjustment programs on women and their households in Bendel women in West Africa: a Nigerian case study / In: Gallin, Rita S. / Ferguson, Anne (eds.): The women and international development annual, vol. 2, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 177-240.[1978]

Ayoola, J.B. (2000): Demand for women entrepreneurship in low-income household: Evidence from Benue State, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 113-120.[1979]

Bender, Donald, R. (1971): De facto families and de jure households in Ondo, (Yoruba), in: American Anthropologist, vol. 73, pp. 223-241.[1980]

Burfisher, Mary E. / Horenstein, Nadine (1985): Sex roles in the Nigerian Tiv farm household, Women's roles and gender differences in development, Cases for Planners, Kumarian Press, West Hartford. [1981]

Caldwell, J. (1976): Fertility and household economy in Nigeria, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 7, pp. 193-252.[1982]

Eboh, E.C. (1993): A household survey of farm women's access to agro-information and technology: Implications for extension training and rural development in Nigeria, in: Journal of Rural Development and Administration, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 1-22[1983]

Elabor-Idemudia, Patience (1991): The impact of structural adjustment programs on women and their households in Bendel and Ogun State, Nigeria, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 128-139.[1984]

Fapohunda, Eleanor (1982): The nuclear household model in Nigerian public and private sector policy, Colonial legacies and socio-political implications, in: Development and Change, vol. 18, pp. 281-294.[1985]

Isiugo-Abanihe, Uche / Oyediran, Kola (2004): Household socioeconomic status and sexual behaviour among Nigerian female youth, in: African Population Studies, vol. 19.[1986]

Jaiyebo, Oluremi (2003): Women and household sustenance, Changing livelihoods and survival strategies in the peri-urban areas of Ibadan, in: Environment and Urbanisation, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 111-120.[1987]

Longhurst, Richard (1986): Household food strategies in response to seasonality and famine, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 27-35.[1988]

Okojie, Christina (1988): Women and rural development, Strategies for sustaining women`s contribution in rural households of Anambra State, WID working papers, 166, Michigan State University, East Lansing.[1989]

Okojie, Christina (2003): Gender and education as determinants of household poverty in Nigeria, in: Van der Hoeven, Rolph / Shorrocks, Anthony F. (eds.): Perspectives on growth and poverty, United Nations University Press, Tokyo/New York.[1990]

Okurji, E.C. (1990): Women's labour, household manangement and agricultural technology in a rural farming community of Anambra State, Nigeria, in: Journal of Educational Research and Development, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 13-37.[1991]

Oyediran, Kola / Odusola, Ayodele (2004): Poverty and the dynamics of women's participation in household decision making in Nigeria, in: African Population Studies, vol. 19, Supplement A, pp. 115-139.[1992]

Rahji, M.A.Y. / Falusi, A.O. (2005): A gender analysis of farm households labour use and its impact on household income in southwestern Nigeria, in: Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, vol. 44, pp. 155-166.[1993]

Sanni, Lekan (2006): Comparative study of female-headed households in the City of Ibadan, in: Jenda, 8.[1994]

Shehu, D.J. / Hassan, W.A. (1995): Women in dairying in the African savanna, Their contribution to agro-pastroal household income in the dry northwest of Nigeria, in: Nomadic People, vol. 36, pp. 53-64.[1995]

Stone, Glenn Davis (1998): Keeping the home fire burning, The changed nature of householding in Kofyar homeland, in: Human Ecology, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 239-265.[1996]

economy - markets and traders

Bastian, Misty (2002): “Vultures of the market place”, South Eastern Nigerian women and discourses of the Ogu Umunwaanyi (Women’s War) of 1929, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 260-281.[2173]

Chuku, Gloria (1995): Women in the economy of Igboland, 1900-1970: A survey, in: African Economic History, 23, pp. 37-50.[2174]

Chuku, Gloria (1999): From petty traders to international merchants, A historical account of three Igbo women of Nigeria in trade and commerce, 1886-1970, in: African Economic History, 27, pp. 1-22.[2175]

Cornwall, Andrea (2007): Of choice, change and continuity, ‘Career strategies’ and tactics for survival among Yoruba women traders, in: Social Anthropology, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 27-46.[2176]

Eames, Elizabeth (1988): Why women went to war, Women and wealth in Ondo Town, Southeastern Nigeria, in: Clark, Gracia (ed.): Traders versus the state, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 81-97.[2177]

Ekechi, Felix (1995): Gender and economic power: The case of Igbo market women of Eastern Nigeria, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 121-139.[2178]

Emovon, Adesuwa (1997): Women of power, A study of market women’s associations in Benin City, Bendel State, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 203-214.[2179]

Falola, Toyin (1995): Gender, business, and space control: Yoruba market women and power, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 22-40.[2180]

Hill, Polly (1969): Hidden trade among the Hausa, in: Man, 4, pp. 392-409.[2181]

Hoffmann, Hortense (1983): Frauen in der Wirtschaft eines Entwicklungslandes - Yoruba Händlerinnen in Nigeria, Verlag für Entwicklungspolitik, Saarbrücken.[2182]

Iyun, Folosade / Oke, E.A. (1993): The impact of contraceptive use among urban traders in Nigeria, Ibadan traders and modernity, in: Momsen, Janet Henshall / Kinnaird, Vivian (eds.): Different places, different voices, Gender and development in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, Routledge, London, pp. 63-73.[2183]

Law, Robin (1995): Legitimate trade and gender relations in Yorubaland and Dahomey, in: Law, Robin / Centre for Commonwealth Studies (ed.): From slave trade to legitimate commerce, The commercial transition in nineteenth century West Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 195-214.[2184]

Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Wurster, Gabriele (1994): „Where I can get what I want“, Stand und Land aus der Sicht berufstätiger Frauen in zwei afrikanischen Städten, in: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, 119, pp. 185-200.[2185]

Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Wurster, Gabriele (1994): Committment to urban versus rural life among professional women in African towns, in: Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Reh, Mechthild (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 153-167.[2186]

Ogbomo, Onaiwu (1995): Esan women traders and pre-colonial economic power, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 1-21.[2187]

Okojie, Christina (1984): Female migrants in the urban labour market: Benin City, Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 3, pp. 547-562.[2188]

Osinubi, Tokunbo / Amaghionyeodiwe, Lloyd (2005): Women in development, The case of Bodija market in Ibadan, South Western Nigeria, in: Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies, vol. 24, no. 1-2, pp. 72-102.[2189]

Osirim, Mary (1992): Gender and entrepreneurship: Issues of capital and technology in Nigerian firms, in: Ahere, A. / Katz, Bernhard (eds.): Privatization and investment in Sub-Saharan Africa, Routledge Publications, New York, pp. 213-248.[2190]

Osirim, Mary (1996): The dynamics of modern development, Structural adjustment and women microentrepreneurs in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Turpin, Jennifer (ed.): The gendered new world order, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-146.[2191]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Children as entrepreneurs - Case studies from Kano, Nigeria, in: Greenfield, S. / Stickon, A. (eds.): Entrepreneurs and social change, University Press of America, Lanham, pp. 195-223.[2192]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Widows in Hausa society, Ritual phase or social status, in: Potash, B. (eds.): Widows in African societies, Choises and constraints, Stanford, Stanford University Press, pp. 131-152.[2193]

Schildkrout, Enid (1987): Age and gender in Hausa society: Socio-economic roles of children in urban Kano, in: Fontaine, J.S. (ed.): Sex and age as principles of social differentiation, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 109-137.[2194]

Schildkrout, Enid (1979): Women’s work and children’s work, Variations among Moslems in Kano, in: Wallmann, S. (ed.): Social anthropology of work, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 69-85.[2195]

Schildkrout, Enid (1982): Dependency and autonomy: The economic activities of secluded Hausa women in Kano, Nigeria, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 55-82. [2196]

Sudarkasa, Niara (1973): Where women work: A study of Yoruba women in the market place and in the home, Michigan.[2197]

VerEcke, Catherine (1995): Muslim women traders of Northern Nigeria: Perspectives from the city of Yola, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, James Currey Publishers, London, pp. 59-79.[2198]

Watts, Susan (1984): Rural women as food processors and traders: Eko market in in the Ilorin area of Nigeria, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 71-82.[2199]

Willer, Heidi (1995): Women industrialists - A potential for economic development in Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Hamburg, pp. 99-134.[2200]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1987): Marktfrauen in Nigeria, Ökonomie und Politik im Leben der Yoruba-Händlerinnen, Veröffentlichungen aus dem Institut für Afrikakunde, Hamburg.[2201]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1988): Frauenarbeit im informellen Sektor von Ibadan, Nigeria, Informationszentrum Afrika, Afrika Hefte 1, Bremen.[2202]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1988): Strukturanpassung - ein Ausweg aus der Krise? Auswirkungen der Strukturanpassungspolitik auf die Situation von Frauen in nigerianischen Städten, in: Beiträge zur feministischen Theorie und Praxis, Heft 23, pp. 65-75.[2203]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1989): „Unintended hardship“ - Zur sozio-ökonomischen Situation von Frauen in nigerianischen Städten, in: Gruppe Feministischer Internationalismus / Beheim-Schwarzbach, Beate et. al. (Hg.): Zwischen Staatshaushalt und Haushaltskasse, Frauen in der Weltwirtschaft, Bremen, pp. 94-106.[2204]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1990): Tendenzen struktureller Veränderungen im informellen Sektor am Beispiel von Frauenarbeitsbereichen in Ibadan (Nigeria), in: Boehm, Ulrich / Kappel, Robert (Hrsg.): Kleinbetriebe des informellen Sektors und Ausbildung im subsaharischen Afrika, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg, pp. 55-68.[2205]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1995): Research on gender relations with reference to Ghana and Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 135-151.[2206]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1997): Strukturanpassung und geschlechtsspezifische Differenzierungen am Beispiel Nigerias und Ghanas, in: Braig, Marianne (Hg.): Begegnungen und Einmischungen, Akademischer Verlag, Stuttgart, pp. 147-164.[2207]

economy - pastoralism

Shehu, D.J. / Hassan, W.A. (1995): Women in dairying in the African savanna, Their contribution to agro-pastroal household income in the dry northwest of Nigeria, in: Nomadic People, vol. 36, pp. 53-64. [2417]

VerEecke, Catherine (1989): From pasture to purdah: The transformation of women’s roles and identity among the Adamawa Fulbe, in: Ethnology, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 53-73.[2418]

Waters-Bayer, Anne (1985): Dairy by settled Fulani women in Central Nigeria and some implications for dairy development, ODI Pastoral Network Paper No.20c, London.[2419]

Waters-Bayer, Anne (1986): Modernizing milk production in Nigeria: Who benefits? in: Ceres, vol. 19, no. 5, pp. 34-37.[2420]

Waters-Bayer, Anne (1988): Daiying by settled Fulani agro-pastoralists in central Nigeria, The role of women and implications for dairy development, Wissenschaftsverlag Vauk, Kiel.[2421]

Waters-Bayer, Anne (1994): Studying pastoral women’s knowledge on milk processing and marketing, in: Agriculture and Human Values, 11, 2-3, pp. 85-95.[2422]

education schooling and tertiary education

Abidogun, Jamaine (2007): Western education’s impact on Northern Igbo gender roles in Nsukka, Nigeria, in: Africa Today, vol. 54, no. 1.[2736]

Adamu, Muhammad (1993): The Muslim woman and technical education in Nigeria, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 37, pp. 287-290.[2737]

Adamu, Uba Abdallah (1993): Balancing the equation, Girls, tradition and science education in Northern Nigeria, in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 14-31.[2738]

Adesemowo, P.O. (1987): Adolescence sexuality: The need for sex education in Nigeria, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, vol. 29, pp. 61-75.[2739]

Adetunji, Jacob (1995): Infant mortality and mother's education in Ondo State, Nigeria, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 253-263.[2740]

Akande, B.E. (1987): Rural-urban comparison of female education aspirations in South West Nigeria, in: Comparative Education, 23, pp. 75-83.[2741]

Anyanwu, J.C. (1994): Women’s education and the use of bank credit in Nigeria, Callenges for the twenty-first century, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 45-60.[2742]

Azikiwe, Uche (1992): Non-formal education programme for rural women in Nigeria, in: Nigerian Journal of Rural and Community Development, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 82-91.[2743]

Badejo, O.O. (2000): Interaction of some socio-economic determinants of women education in Yobe, in: Annals of Borno: vol. 17/18, pp. 47-56.[2744]

Ben Chuks, Okeke (2004): Literacy/numeracy and vocational training among rural women in Nigeria for a good livelihood and empowerment, in: International Journal of Lifelong Education, vol 23, pp. 287-299.[2745]

Biraimah, Karen (1987): Educational opportunties and life chances, Gender differentiation within a Nigerian elementary school, Women and International Development Working Papers no. 150, Michigan State Univerity, East Lansing.[2746]

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Olusanya, P.O. (1970): Status differentials in the fertility attitudes of married women in two communities in Western Nigeria, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 19-34.[4755]

Omigbodun, Olayinka et. al. (2004): Unmet need for sexuality education among adolescent girls in Southwest Nigeria, A qualitative analysis, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 27-37.[4751]

Omoyibo, Kingsley (2002): Adolescent females' reproductive health in Nigeria: A study on the legislation and socio-cultural impediments to abortion and against female circumcision, Peter Lang Publishers, Frankfurt am Main.[4756]

Oni, G. / McCarthy, J. (1986): Use of contraceptives for birth spacing in a Nigerian city, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 17, no. 4, pp.165-171.[4752]

Oni, G. / McCarthy, J. (1986): Use of contraceptives for birth spacing in a Nigerian city, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 165-171.[4757]

Oppong, Christine (ed.) (1978): Marriage, fertility and parenthood in West Africa, Australian University Press, Canberra.[4758]

Oppong, Christine (ed.) (1989): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa, Policy-related studies on work and demographic issues, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth.[4759]

Orobaton, Nosa (2000): Dimensions of sexuality among Nigerian men, Implications for fertility and reproductive health, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Lerner, Susana / Guyer, Jane (eds.): Fertility and the male life-cycle in the era of fertility decline, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[4760]

Oroge, S.A. (2000): The national policy on population and its educational implications for women development, in: Nigerian Journal of Gender and Development, vol. 1, no. 1-2, pp. 67-74.[4761]

Orubuloye, I. Olatunji / Oguntimehin, Folakemi. / Sadiq, T. (1997): Women's role in reproductive health decision making and vulnerability to STD and HIV/AIDS in Ekiti, Nigeria, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 7, Supplement, pp. 329-336.[4762]

Orubuloye, J.O. / Caldwell, J.C. (1993): African women’s control over their sexuality in an era of AIDS, A study of the Yoruba of Nigeria, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 37, no. 7, pp. 859-872.[4763]

Osagbemi, M.O. / Adepetu, A.A. (2001): Gender differences in the reasons for paticipation in spouse-sharing among the Okun in Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 5, pp. 36-55.[4765]

Osakue, Grace / Martin-Hilber, Adiane (1998): Women’s sexuality and fertility in Nigeria, Breaking the culture of silence, in: Petchesky, Rosalind / Judd, Karen (eds.): Negotiating reproductive rights, Zed Books, London, pp. 180-216.[4764]

Owoade, M. Adekunle (1988): The legal implication of contraception in contemporary Nigeria, in: Indian Socio-Legal Journal, vol. 14, no. 1-2, pp. 67-82.[4766]

Oye-Adeniran, Boniface / Adewole, Isaac et al. (2004): Community-based survey of unwanted pregancy in Southwestern Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 103-115.[4767]

Oyekanmi, Felicia Duropjaiye (1994): Women’s attitude toward sexually transmitted diseases in Nigeria, A case study in Osun State, in: Africa Development, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 147-165.[4768]

Panchaud, Christine et al. (2002): Gender and human rights dimensions of HIV/AIDS in Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 30-37.[4769]

Pearce, Tola (2001): Women, the state and reproductive health issues in Nigeria, in: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, vol. 1, no. 1.[4770]

Rehan, N. (1984): Knowledge attitudes and practice in family planning in Hausa women, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 839-844.[4771]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Gender ideology and fertility strategies in an Ekiti Yourba village, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 343-353.[4772]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Condome use and the popular press in Nigeria, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 41-56.[4773]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Changes in adolescent sexuality and the perception of virginity in a southwestern Nigerian village, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 3, pp. 121-133.[4774]

Renne, Elisha (1996): Virginity cloths and vaginal coverings in Ekiti, Nigeria, in: Hendickson, Hildi (ed.): Clothing and difference, Embodied identities in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 19-33.[4775]

Renne, Elisha (1996): The pregnancy that doesn't stay: The practice and perception of abortion by Ekiti Yoruba women, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 42, pp. 483-494.[4776]

Renne, Elisha (1996): Percpeptions of population policy, development, and family planning programs in Northern Nigeria, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 27, no. 3, pp. 127-136.[4777]

Renne, Elisha (2004): Gender roles and women’s status, What they mean to Hausa Muslim women in Northern Nigeria, in: Szreter, S. / Dharmalingam, A. / Sholkamy, H. (eds.): Qualitative demography, Categoreis and contexts in population studies, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[4778]

Sunmola, Adebgena et al. (2003): Reproductive knowledge, sexual behaviour and contraceptive use among adolescents in Niger State of Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 37-48.[4779]

Trevitt, Lorna (1973): Attitudes and customs in childbirth amongst the Hausa women in Zaria City, in: Savanna, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 223-226.[4780]

Wall, Lewis (1998): The social context of maternal mobidity and morality among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 61-89.[4781]

Yahaya, Kuta Mohammed (2002): Analysis of women’s reproductive health situation in Bida Emirate of Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 60-64.[4782]

health

Abah, Steve Oga (2002): Playing in the dust, Gender games and women’s health in Nigeria, in: Cornwall, Andrea / Welbourn, Alice (eds.): Realizing rights, Transforming approaches to sexual and reproductive well-being, Zed Books, London, pp. 73-83.[5051]

Adepoju, Adunola / Aina, O.I. et al. (2002): The culture of male supremacy and emergency obstetric care, The Nigerian experience, in: African Anthropologist, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 157-182.[5052]

Chiwuzie, J.C. / Okolocha, C. (2001): Traditional belief systems and maternal mortality in a semi-urban community in Southern Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 5, pp. 75-82.[5053]

Iyun, Bose (1995): The impact of structural adjustment on maternal and child health in Nigeria, in: Thomas-Emeagwali, Gloria (ed.): Women pay the price: Structural adjustment in Africa and the Caribbean, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5054]

Lewis, I.M. / Al-Safi, A. / Hurreiz, S. (eds.) (1991): Women’s medicine, The Zar-Bori cult in Africa and beyond, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.[5055]

MacLean, U. (1997): Folk medicine and fertility, Aspects of Yourba medical practice affecting women, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.) Power, reproduction and gender: Intergenerational transfer of knowledge, Zed Books, London, pp. 161-179.[5056]

Odimegwu, Clifford (2001): Tradition and health: The predicament of female adolescents among the Igbo, in: Journal of Cultural Studies, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 284-300.[5057]

Okafor, Chinyelu B./ Rizzuto, Rahna R. (1994): Women's and health-care providers' views of maternal practices and services in rural Nigeria, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 353-361[5058]

Okojie, Christina (1995): Environmental hazards and the health status of women and children in a Riverine Community in Nigeria: Nikrowa in Edo State, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 10, pp. 25-35[5059]

Okunribido, Osibamke (1997): Cultural perceptions of diarrhea and illness management choices among Yoruba mothers in Oyo State, Nigeria, in: International Quarterly of Community Health, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 309-318.[5060]

Owoh, Kenna (1995): Gender and health in Nigerian structural adjustment, Rae Lesser (ed.): Engendering wealth and well-being: Empowerment for global change, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 181-194.[5061]

Wall, Lewis (1998): The social context of maternal mobidity and morality among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 61-89.[5062]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Achebe, Nwando (2005): Farmers, traders, warriors, and kings: Female power and authority in Northern Igboland, 1900-1960, Heinemann, Portsmouth.[5380]

Afonja, Simi (1986): Women, power and authority in traditional Yoruba society, in: Dube, Leela / Leacock, Eleanor /Ardener, Shirley (eds.): Visibility and power, Essays on women in society and development, Oxford University Press, NewYork, Oxford, pp. 136-157.[5381]

Afonja, Simi (1988): Historical evolution in the sexual division of labor in Nigeria, in: Kleinberg, S. Jay (ed.): Retrieving women's history: Changing perceptions of the role of women in politics and society. Berg Publications, Oxford, pp. 133-147.[5382]

Awe, Bolanle (1977): The Iyaloda in the traditional Yoruba political system, in: Schlegel, Alice (ed.), Sexual Stratification, A cross-cultural view, Columbia University Press, New York, pp. 144-160.[5383]

Bastian, Misty (2001): Dancing women and colonial men: The Nwaobiala of 1925, in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 109-129.[5384]

Bastian, Misty (2002): “Vultures of the market place”, South Eastern Nigerian women and discourses of the Ogu Umunwaanyi (Women’s War) of 1929, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 260-281.[5385]

Bivins, Mary (2007): Telling stories, making histories, Women, words, and Islam in nineteenth century Hausaland and Sokoto Caliphate, Heinemann Publishers, London.[5386]

Byfield, Judith (1996): Women, marriage, divorce and the emerging colonial state in Abeokuta (Nigeria) 1892-1914, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 32-51. und in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, 2001, pp. 27-46.[5387]

Byfield, Judith (1997): Innovating and conflict: Cloth dyers and the interwar depression in Abeokuta, Nigeria, in: Journal of African History, vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 77-99.[5388]

Byfield, Judith (2002): The bluest hands, A social and economic history of women dryers in Abeokuta (Nigeria), 1890-1940, James Currey, London.[5389]

Callaway, Helen (1987): Gender, culture and empire: European women in colonial Nigeria, London.[5390]

Callaway, Helen (1993): Purity and exotica in legitimating the empire: Cultural constructions of gender, sexuality and race, in: Ranger, Terence O. / Vaughan, O. (eds.): Legitimacy and the state in the twentieth century Africa, Basingstoke - London, pp. 31-61.[5391]

Chuku, Gloria (1995): Women in the economy of Igboland, 1900-1970: A survey, in: African Economic History, 23, pp. 37-50.[5392]

Chuku, Gloria (1999): From petty traders to international merchants, A historical account of three Igbo women of Nigeria in trade and commerce, 1886-1970, in: African Economic History, 27, pp. 1-22.[5393]

Chuku, Gloria (2005): Ibo women and economic transformation in Southeastern Nigeria, 1900-1960, Routledge, London.[5394]

Denzer, La Ray (1989): Women in government service in colonial Nigeria, 1862-1945, Working Papers, no. 136, African Studies Centre, Boston.[5395]

Denzer, La Ray (1992): Domestic science training in colonial Yorubaland, Nigeria, in: Hansen, Karen T. (ed.): African encounters with domesticity, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, pp. 116-139.[5396]

Denzer, La Ray (1994): Yoruba women, A historical study, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 27, pp. 1-39.[5397]

Edgerton, Robert (2000): Warrior women, The Amazon of Dahomey and the nature of war, Westview Press, Boulder.[5398]

Ejituwu, Nkparom C. / Amakievi, Gabriel O.I. (eds.) (2004): Women in Nigerian history, Rivers and Bayelsa States Experience, Onyoma Research Publications, Lagos.[5399]

Emezi, C.E. (1981): Protest and political disobedience in colonial South-Eastern Nigeria, in: Journal of African Studies, vol. 8, pp. 138-141.[5400]

Fisher, Humphrey (1991): Slavery and seclusion in Northern Nigeria, A further note, in: Journal of African History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 123-135.[5401]

Gailey, Harry (1970): The road to Aba, New York University Press, New York.[5402]

Grau, Ingeborg (1989): Frauen in Geschichte und Geschichtsschreibung Afrikas, zur historischen Aufarbeitung früher anti-kolonialer Bewegungen nigerianischer Frauen als Beitrag zur Frauenforschung, in: ZAST, vol. 4, pp. 8-23.[5403]

Grau, Ingeborg (1998): Kolonialismus, Arbeit und Gender in Südnigeria, in: Bockhorn, Olaf (ed.): Wie aus Bauern Arbeiter wurden, Brandes u. Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., pp. 101-126.[5404]

Green, M.M. (1964): Igbo willage affairs, New York.[5405]

Haggis, Jane (1990): Gendering colonialism or colonizing gender? Recent women’s studies approaches to white women and their history in British Colonialism, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 13, no. 1-2, pp. 105-115.[5406]

Hill, Polly (1977): Population, prosperity and poverty: Rural Kano 1900-1977, Cambridge.[5407]

Ifeka-Moller, Caroline (1975): Female militancy and colonial revolt - The ‘Women’s War’ of 1929, Eastern Nigeria, om_ Ardener, Shirley (ed.): Perceiving women, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 127-157.[5408]

Johnson, Cheryl (1979): Towards a conceptual framework for the study of African women, A case of pre-colonial and colonial Yoruba women, in: Red River Historical Journal of World History, vol. 55, pp. 52-63.[5409]

Johnson, Cheryl (1981): Madame Alimotu Pelewura and the Lagos Market Women, in: Tarikh: Grass Roots Leadership in Colonial West Africa, vol. 7, pp. 1-10.[5410]

Johnson, Cheryl (1982): Grass roots organizing, Women in anticolonial activity in Southwestern Nigeria, in: African Studies Review, vol. XXV, no. 2-3, pp. 137157.[5411]

Johnson, Cheryl (1992): On behalf of women and the nation, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti and the struggle for Nigerian independence, in: Johnson-Odim, Cheryl / Strobel, Margaret (eds.): Expanding the boundaries of women’s history, Essays on women in the Third World, Bloomington, Indianapolis, pp. 144-158.[5412]

Johnson-Odim, Cheryl / Mba, Nina Emma (1997): For women and the nation, Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti, University of Illinois Press, Chicago.[5413]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1990): Männerdienst und Geheimnis am Königshof von Benin, in: Völger, Gisela / von Welck, Karin (eds.): Ethnologica, vol. 15, no. 1, Cologne, pp. 25-32.[5414]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): Iyoba, The Queen Mother of Benin, Images and ambiguity in gender and sex roles in court art, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 73-102.[5415]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): “Runaway wives”, Native law and custom in Benin, and early colonial courts, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 245-[5416]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): In splendor and seclusion, Art and royal women at the court of Benin, Nigeria, Thames and Hudson, London.[5417]

Kirk, Ilse (1986): „Women’s war or „Aba riots“? A new perspective on the events in Southeastern Nigeria, 1929, in: Folk, vol. 28, pp. 61-86.[5418]

Korieh, Chima J. (2001): The invisible farmer? Women, gender, and colonial agricultural policy in the Igbo region of Nigeria, c. 1913-1954, in: African Economic History, no. 29, pp. 117-162.[5419]

Korieh, Chima J. (2010): The land has changed, History, society and gender and in colonial Eastern Nigeria, University of Calgary Press, Calgary.[5420]

Leith-Ross, Sylvia (1983): Stepping stones, Memoirs of colonial Nigeria, 1907-1960, Peter Owen, London.[5421]

Lindsay, Lisa (1998): ‘No need ... to think of home’? Masculinity and domestic life on the Nigerian railway, c.1940-1961, in: Journal of African History, vol. 39, pp. 439-466.[5422]

Lindsay, Lisa (1999): Domesticity and difference, Male breadwinners, working women and colonial citizenship in the 1945 Nigerian strike, in: American Historical Review, vol.104, no. 3, pp. 783-812.[5423]

Lindsay, Lisa (2003): Money, marriage and masculinity on the colonial Nigerian railway, in: Lindsey, Lisa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Men and masculinities in modern Africa, Heinemann Publishers, London.[5424]

Lindsay, Lisa (2003): Working with gender, Wage labour and social change in Southwestern Nigeria, Heinemann, Porthmouth.[5425]

Lindsay, Lisa (2007): Working with gender, The emergence of the ‘male breadwinner’ in colonial Southwestern Nigeria, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 241-252.[5426]

Lovejoy, Paul (1988): Concubinage and the status of women slaves in early colonial Northern Nigeria, in: Journal of African History, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 245-266.[5427]

Mack, Beverly (1988): Hahjiya Ma’daki: A royal Hausa woman, in: Romero, P. / Mack, B. (eds.): Life histories of African women, Ashfield Press, London, pp. 47-77.[5428]

Mack, Beverly (1990): Services and status, Slaves and concubines in Kano, Nigeria, in: Sanjek, Roger / Colen, Shellee (eds.): At work in homes, Household workers in world perspective, Publications of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, pp. 14-34.[5429]

Mack, Beverly (1991): Royal wives of Kano, in: Coles, C. / Mack, B. (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 109-129.[5430]

Mack, Beverly (1997): Authority and influence in Kano Harem, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 159-172.[5431]

Mann, Kristin (1981): Marriage choices among the educated African elite in Lagos colony, 1880-1915, in: Journal of African Historical Studies, 14, 2.[5432]

Mann, Kristin (1982): Women’s land rights in law and practice, Marriage dispute settlement in colonial Lagos, in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston University Papers, Boston, pp. 151-171.[5433]

Mann, Kristin (1983): The daughters of dependence, Christian marriage among elite women in Lagos colony, 1880-1915, in: Journal of African History, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 37-56.[5434]

Mann, Kristin (1985): Marrying well: Marriage, status and social change among the educated elite in colonial Lagos, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[5435]

Mann, Kristin (1991): Women, landed property and accumulation of wealth in early colonial Lagos, in: Signs, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 682-706.[5436]

Mann, Kristin (1994): The historical roots and cultural consequences of outside marriage in colonial Lagos, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Giles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 167-193.[5437]

Martin, Susan (1984): Gender and innovation, Farming, cooking and palm processing in the Ngwa Region, South Eastern Nigeria, 1900-1930, in: Journal of African History, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 411-427.[5438]

Martin, Susan (1988): Palm oil and protest, An economic history of Nqwa, Eastern Nigeria, 1880-1980, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[5439]

Martin, Susan (1995): Slaves, Igbo women and palm oil in the nineteenth century, I: Law, Robin (ed.): From slave trade to ‘legitimate’ commerce, The commercial transition in nineteenth-century West Africa, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, pp. 172-194.[5440]

McIntosh, Marjorie (2009): Yoruba women, work and social change, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[5441]

Mendy, Marion / Sarr, Assan (2017): The ambiguity of gender, Ifi Amadiume and the writing of gender history in Igboland, in: Journal of West African History, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 109-116.[5442]

Naanen, B. (1991): Itinerant goldmines’: Prostitution in the Cross River Basin in Nigeria, 1930-1950, in: African Studies Review, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 33-47.[5443]

Nast, Heidi (1994): The impact of British imperialism on the landscape of female slavery in the Kano Palace, Northern Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 34-73.[5444]

Nast, Heidi (2004): Concubines and power: Five hundred years in a Northern Nigerian palace, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[5445]

Newell, Stephanie (2003): J.M. Stuart-Young in Onitsha, colonial Nigeria, the Englishman who married a mermaid, in: Africa, vol. 73, no. 4, pp. 505-530.[5446]

Olupona, Jacob (1997): Women’s rituals, kingship and power among the Ondo-Yoruba of Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 315-336.[5447]

Osagie, Joseph (2000): Esan women, agriculture and colonial rule, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic History, no. 3, pp. 16-32.[5448]

Oyewumi, Oyerone (1993): Inventing gender, Questioning gender in precolonial Yorubaland, in: Collins, Robert (ed.): Problems in African history, The precolonial centuries, Markus Wiener Publishers, New York, pp. 244-252.[5449]

Pereira, Charmaine (2005): Domesticating women? Gender, religion and the state in Nigeria under colonial and military rule, in: African Identities, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 69-94.[5450]

Perham, Margery (1983): West African passage, A journey through Nigeria, Chad and the Cameroons, Peter Owen, London.[5451]

Semley, Lorelle (2010): Mother is gold, Father is glass, Gender and colonialism in a Yorub town, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [5452]

Sutton, Constance (1995): From city-states to post-colonial nation-state, Yoruba women’s changing military roles, in: Sutton, Constance (ed.): Feminism, nationalism and militarism, Publications of the Association for Feminist Anthropology, Washington D.C., pp. 89-102.[5453]

Tibenderana, P.K. (1985): The beginnings of girls’ education in the native administration schools in Northern Nigeria, 1930-1945, in: Journal of African History, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 101-119.[5454]

Van Allen, Judith (1972): Sitting on a man: Colonialism and the lost political institutions of Igbo women, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 165-181.[5455]

Van Allen, Judith (1976): Aba riots or "Igbo women’s war": Ideology, stratification and the invisibility of women, in: Hafkin, Nancy / Bay, Edna (eds.): Women in Africa - Sstudies in social and economic change, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 59-85.[5456]

Wariboko, Waibinte (1995): The status, role and influence of women in the Eastern Delta States of Nigeria, 1850-1990, in: Shepherd, Verene / Breretopn, Bridget / Bailey, Barbara (eds.): Engendering history, Carribean women in historical perspectives, St. Martin`s Press, New York, pp. 369-383.[5457]

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Christian, Barbara (1985): The angle of seeing: Motherhood in Buchi Emecheta’s The joys of motherhood and Alice Walker’s Meridan, in: Christian, Barbara (ed.): Perspectives on Black Women Writers, Pergamon Press, Oxford, pp. 211-251.[5894]

Chukwuma, Helen (1987): Nigerian female authors, 1970 to the present, in: Matatu - Zeitschrift für afrikanische Kultur und Gesellschaft, 1, 2, pp. 23-46.[5895]

Conde, Maryse (1972): Three female writers in modern Africa: Flora Nwapa, Ama Ata Aidoo and Grace Ogot, in: Présence Afriaine, vol. 82, pp. 132-141.[5896]

Cooper, Brenda (2007): Banished from Oedipus?: Buchi Emecheta's and Assia Djebar's gendered language of resistance, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 143-160.[5897]

Coulon, Virginia (1990): Women at war, Nigerian women writers and the civil war, in: Commonwealth, Essays and Studies, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-12.[5898]

Davies, Boycs Carole (1986): Motherhood in the works of male and female Igbo writers: Achebe, Emecheta, Nwapa and Nzekwu, in: Davies, Carole Boyc / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Trenton, pp. 241-256.[5899]

Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.) (1986): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5900]

Daymond, M.J. (1985): Buchi Emecheta, laughter and silence, Changes in the concepts „women“, „wife“ and „mother“, in: Journal of Literary Studies, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 64-74.[5901]

Dodson, Danita (1996): The cycle of utopia in Buchi Emecheta’s Rape of Shavi, in: Obsidian, II, Black Literature in Review, vol. 11, no. 1-2, pp. 3-20.[5902]

Eko, Ebele / Ogu, Julius / Oku, Emelia (1997): Flora Nwapa, Critical perspectives, University of Calabar Press, Calabar.[5903]

Emenyonu, Ernest N. (1973): Who does Flora Nwapa write for? in: African Literature Today, vol. 7, pp. 28-33.[5904]

Emenyonu, Ernest N. (1988): Technique and language in Buchi Emecheta’s The Bride Price, The Slave Girl and The Joys of Motherhood, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 23, 1, pp. 130-141.[5905]

Erwin, Lee (2002): Genre and authority in some popular Nigerian women’s novels, in: Research in African Literatures: vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 81-99.[5906]

Ezeigbo, Akachi (1996): Gender issues in Nigeria, A feminine perspective, Vista Books, Lagos.[5907]

Ezeigbo, Akachi (1997): Gender and conflict in Flora Nwapa’s novels, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 95-104.[5908]

Fido, Elaine Savory (1991): Motherlands: Self and separation in the work of Buchi Emecheta, Bessie Head and Jean Rys, in: Nasta, Susheila (eds.): Motherlands, Black women’s writing from Africa, the Carribean and South Asia, London, pp. 330-349.[5909]

Fishburn, Katherine (1995): Reading Buchi Emecheta, Cross-cultural conversations, Greenwood Press, Westport.[5910]

Fluche, Christiane (2002): Palaver, Geschlechter- und Gesellschaftsdiskurs in Nigeria, Kon/Textuelle Lesung ausgewählter Romane der Igbo-Autorinnen Buchi Emecheta und Flora Nwapa, Bayreuth African Studies, Bayreuth.[5911]

Frank, Katherin (1982): The death of a slave girl, African womanhood in the novel of Buchi Emecheta, in: World Literature written in English, 21, 3, pp. 476-496.[5912]

Granqvist, Raoul / Inyama, Nnadozie (eds.) (1992): Power and powerlessness of women in West African orality, Umea Papers, Umea 1992.[5913]

Green-Simms, Lindsey (2016): The Emergent Queer, Homosexuality and Nigerian Fiction in the 21st Century, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 139-161.[11744]

Haraway, Donna (1988): Reading Buchi Emecheta, in: Inscriptions, 3-4, pp. 107-141.[5914]

Harrell-Bond, Barbara (1980): Mariama Ba, Winner of the first Noma Award for Publishing in Africa, in: African Book Publishing Records, 6, pp. 209-214.[5915]

Hauwa Kassam, Margaret (1997): Behind the veil of northern Nigeria: the writing of Zaynab Alkali and Hauwa Ali, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 117-125.[5916]

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton.[5917]

Hogan, Patrick Holm (1999): „How sisters should behave to sisters“: Women’s culture and Igbo society in Flora Nwapa’s Efuru, in: English in Africa, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 45-60.[5918]

Hunter, Eva (1994): “What exactly is civilisation?” ‘Africa’, ‘The west’ and gender in Buchi Emecheta’s The rape of Shavi, in: English Studies in Africa, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. 47-62.[5919]

Ikonné, Chidi (1992): The folk roots of Flora Nwapa’s early novels, in: African Literature Today, vol. 18, pp. 96-104.[5920]

James, Adeola (1990): Buchi Emecheta, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London, pp. 34-45.[5921]

James, Adeola (1990): Flora Nwapa, in: James, Adeola: In their own voices, African women writers talk, London pp. 111-117.[5922]

Jell-Bahlsen, Sabine (1995): The concept of Mammy Water in Flora Nwapa’s novels, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 26, no. 2, pp.199-289.[5923]

Johnson, Rotimi (1988): The social vision of Zaynab Alkali, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 649-655.[5926]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London.[5924]

Jones, Eldred / Palmer, Eustance / Jones, Marjorie (eds.) (1987): Women in African literature today, special issue, African Literature Today, vol. 15, London.[5927]

Julien, Eileen (2007): When a man loves a woman, Gender and national identity in Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman and Mariama Ba’s Scarlet Song, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 205-222.[5925]

Katrak, K.H. (1987): Womanhood / Motherhood: Variations on a theme in selected novels of Buchi Emecheta, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 159-170.[5928]

Kohrs-Amissah, Edith (ed.) (1999): Aspects of feminism and gender in the novels of the three West African Writers: Aidoo, Emecheta, Darko, Books on African Stuies, Bayreuth.[5929]

Linton Umeh, Marie (1986): Reintegration with a lost self: A study of Cuchi Emecheta’s Double Yoke, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 173-180.[5930]

Mack, Beverly (1981): Hausa women poets, Ghost writers, in: Ba Shiru, 12, 2.[5931]

Mack, Beverly (1986): Songs from Silence: Hausa women’s poetry, in: Davies, Carole Boycs / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 181-190.[5932]

Mezu, Ure Rose (1997): Buchi Emecheta’s ‚the bride price’ and ‚the slave girl’, A schizoanalytic perspective, in: Ariel, A Review of International English Literature, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 131-146.[5933]

Moyola, Ibiyemi (1997): The onus of womanhood: Mariama Bâ and Zaynab Alkali, in: Newell, Stephanie (Hg.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 126-136.[5934]

Nandakumar, Premar (1971): An image of African womanhood: A study of Flora Nwapa’s Efuru, in: African Quarterly, 11, pp. 136-146.[5935]

Newell, Stephanie (ed.) (1988): Writing African women, Gender, popular culture and literature, Zed Books, London.[5936]

Nfah-Abbenyi, Juliana Makuchi (1997): Gender in African women’s writing, Identity, sexuality, and difference, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[5937]

Ngcobo, Lauretta (1988): African motherhood - myths and reality, in: Petersen, Kirsten (ed.): Criticism and Ideology, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 141-154.[5938]

Nwajiaku, Ijeoma (2009): Building bridges and shifting frontiers, Gender, culture and identity in Buchi Emecheta’s Kehinde and The new tribe, in: Korieh, Chima / Okeke-Ihejirika, Philomina (eds.): Gendering global transformations, Gender, culture, race, and identity, Routledge, London, pp. 135-149.[5939]

Nzegwu, Femi (2001): Love, motherhood and the African heritage, The legacy of Flora Nwapa, African Books Collective, Oxford.[5940]

Ogunjimi, Bayo (1997): Masculinity: The military, women and cultural politics in Nigeria, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African Women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 29-39.[5944]

Ogunyemi, Chikwenye Okonjo (1995): Flora Nwapa, in: Special issue: Research in African Literature, vol. 26, no. 2.[5942]

Ogunyemi, Chikwenye Okonjo (1996): Africa wo/men palava, The Nigerian novel by women, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[5943]

Oha, Obododimma (1997): Culture and gender semantics in Flora Nwapa’s poetry, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, London, Zed Books, pp. 105-116.[5945]

Ohaeto, Ezenwa (1988): The other voices: The poetry of three Nigerian writers, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no.3, pp. 662-668.[5941]

Ohaeto, Ezenwa (1988): The other voices: The poetry of three Nigerian writers, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 662-668.[5946]

Ojo-Ade, Femi (1988): Women and the Nigerian civil war, Buchi Emecheta and Flora Nwapa, in: Etudes Germano-Africaines, 6.[5947]

Olaogun, Modupe (2002): Slavery and etiological discourse in the writing of Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Buchi Emecheta, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.171-193.[5948]

Otokunefor, Henrietta C. / Nwodo, Obiageli, C. (eds.) (1989): Nigerian female writers, A critical perspective, Malthouse Press, Lagos.[5949]

Palmer, E. (1983): The feminine point of view: Buchi Emecheta’s „The joys of motherhood“, in: African Literature Today, vol. 13, pp. 38-55.[5950]

Pandey, Anita (2004): Woman 'palava' no be small, woman 'wahala' no be small: Linguistic gendering and patriarchal ideology in West African fiction, in: Africa Today, vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 113-138. [5951]

Pape, Marion (1997): Literacy representations of the Nigerian civil war and the case of Flora Nwapa’s Never Again, in: Meyer-Bahlburg, Hilke (ed.): Levels of perception and reproduction of reality in modern African literature, University of Leipzig Papers on Africa, No. 3/4, pp. 26-37.[5952]

Phillips, Maggi (1994): Engaging dreams: Perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, and Tsitsi Dangarembga writing, in: Research in African Literature, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 89-103.[5953]

Powell, Andrea (2008): Problematizing polygyny in the historical novels of Chinua Achebe: the role of the Western feminist scholar, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 166-184.[5954]

Raji-Oyelade, Aderemi (2008): Notes towards the bibliography of Nigerian women's poetry (1985-2006) / In: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 198-202.[5955]

Solberg, Rolf (1983): The women of black Africa, Buchi Emecheta: The woman’s voice in the new Nigerian novel, in: English Studies, 3, pp. 247-261.[5956]

Sougou, Omar (ed.) (2002): Writing accross cultures, Gender politics and difference in the fiction of Buchi Emecheta, Rodopi, Amsterdam.[5957]

Stratton, Florence (1994): Flora Nwapa and the female novel of development, in: dieselbe (ed.): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 80-107.[5958]

Stratton, Florence (1994): ’Their new sister’: Buchi Emecheta and the contemporary African literary tradition, in: dieselbe (ed.): Contemporary African literature and the politics of gender, Routledge, London, pp. 108-132.[5959]

Taiwo, Oladele (1984): Buchi Emecheta, in Taiwo, Oladele: Female novelists in modern Africa, London.[5960]

Tunca, Daria (2018): Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie as Chinua Achebe´s (unruly) literary daughter, The past, present, and future of ´Adichebean´ criticism, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 107-126.[11591]

Umeh, Linton Marie (1980): African women in transition in the novels of Buchi Emecheta, in: Presence Africaine, 4, pp. 190-201.[5961]

Umeh, Linton Marie (1986): Reintegration of the lost self: A study of Buchi Emecheta’s „double yoke“, in: Davies, Carole Boyc / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika - Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 173-180.[5962]

Umeh, Marie (ed.) (1994): Emerging perspectives of Buchi Emecheta, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5963]

Umeh, Marie (ed.) (1998): Emerging perspectives on Flora Nwapa, Africa World Pres, Trenton.[5964]

Uwakweh, Pauline Ada (1996): Female choices: The militant option in Buchi Emecheta’s Destination Biafra and Alice Walker’s Meridian, in: Egejuru, Phanuel / Katrak, Ketu (eds.): Nwanyibu, Womenbeing and African literature, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 47-59.[5965]

Uwakweh, Pauline Ada (1998): Carvig a niche, Visisons of gendered childhood in Buchi Emecheta’s The Bride Price and Tsitsi Dangarembga’s Nervous Conditions, in: African Literature Today, vol. 12, pp. 9-20.[5966]

Uzoamaka Ada Azodo / Maureen Ngozi Eke (eds.) (2006): Gender and sexuality in African literature and film, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5967]

Ward, Cynthia (1990): What they told Buchi Emecheta, Oral subjectivity and the joys of ‘otherhood’, in: PMLA, 105, pp. 83-97.[5968]

Whitsitt, Novian (2003): Islamic Hausa feminism meets Northern Nigerian romance, The cautious rebellion of Bilkisu Funtuwa, in: African Studies Review, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 137-155.[5970]

Wilnetz, Gay (1992): Flora Nwapa: Efuru, in: Wilentz, Gay (ed.): Binding cultures, Black women writers in Africa and the diaspora, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 3-19.[5969]

Zabus, Chantal (2008): Of female husbands and boarding school girls, Gender bending in Unoma Azuah’s fiction, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 93-107.[5971]

media

Anugwom, Edlyne (2007): Stuck in the middle, Women, ICTs and the struggle for survival in the oil degraded Niger Delta environment, Nigeria, vol. 72, pp. 58-68.[6547]

Bankole, Akinrinola (1996): Mass media messages and reproductive behaviour in Nigeria, in: Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 227-239.[6548]

Eboh, E.C. (1993): A household survey of farm women's access to agro-information and technology: Implications for extension training and rural development in Nigeria, in: Journal of Rural Development and Administration, vol. 25, no. 4, pp. 1-22[6549]

Emenyeonu, N.B. (1991): Motivation for choice of course and career preferences of Nigerian female journalism students: Implications for the status of media women in a developing nation, in: Africa Media Review, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 71-83.[6550]

Lyons, Harriet (1990): Nigerian television and the problems of urban African women, in: Arnold, Stephen et al. (eds.): Culture and development in Africa, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 107-118.[6551]

Ogundipe-Leslie, Molara (1990): The image of women and the role of the media in a new political culture in Nigeria, in: Africa Media Review, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 52-59.[6552]

Ogunleye, Foluke (2003): Female stereotypes in the Nigerian video film: A case for re-socialization, in: Humanities Review Journal, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 1-14.[6553]

Okunna, Chinyere (1992): Sources of development information among rural women in Nigeria: A case study, in: Africa Media Review, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 65-77.[6554]

Okunna, Chinyere (1996): Portrayal of women in Nigerian home video films: Empowerment of subjugation? in: Africa Media Review, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 21-36.[6555]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Condome use and the popular press in Nigeria, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 41-56.[6556]

Yusuf, Hadjia (1991): Mass media, women and politics, in: Chizea, Dora / Yusuf, Hadjia: Mass media, women and politics, in: Chizea, Dora / Njoku, Juliet (eds.): Nigerian women and the challenges of our time, in: Malthouse Press, Lagos.[6557]

politics - wars violent conflicts

Abimbola, Foluke Oluyemisi (2019): Women in Post-Conflict Niger-Delta of Nigeria, Amnesty versus Restorative Justice, in: Journal of Law and Criminal Justice, 7, 1, pp. 23-34.[11905]

Affi, Ladan / Tonnessen, Liv / Tripp, Aili Mari (2021): Women and peacebuilding in Africa, Boydell and Brewer, Rochester [11617]

Ekhator-Mobayode, Uche Eseosa / Hanmer, Lucia C. et al. (2020): Effect of Armed Conflict on Intimate Partner Violence, Evidence from the Boko Haram Insurgency in Nigeria, Policy Research Working Paper, No. 9168, World Bank, Washington, DC.[11908]

International Crisis Group (2016): Nigeria, Women and the Boko Haram Insurgency, Africa report no. 242, Brussels.[11906]

Mikell, Gwendolyn (2005): Working from within: Nigerian women and conflict resolution, in: Georgetown Journal of International Affairs, vol. 6, no. 2 pp. 87-94. [11907]

Ogege, S.O. (2009): Conflict resolution and peace building, The gender question in the Niger delta crisis in Nigeria, in: African Research Review, vol. 3, no. 5.[11909]

politics

Abdullah, Hussaina (1993): Transitional politics and the challenge of gender in Nigeria, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 56, pp. 27-37.[7314]

Abdullah, Hussaina (1995): Wifeism and activism: the Nigerian women’s movement, in: Basu, Amrita (ed.): Women’s movement in global perspective, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 209-225.[7315]

Abdullah, Hussaina (1997): Multiple identities and multiple organizing strategies of female wage workers in Kano’s manufacturing sector, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women`s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 54-68.[7316]

Abdullah, Hussaina (2002): Religious revivalism, human rights activism and the struggle for women's rights in Nigeria, in: Na'im, Abd A.A. (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 151-191.[7317]

Abdullah, Hussaina (2007): Women as emergent actors A survey of new women’s organizations in Nigeria since the 1990s, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 150-167.[7318]

Aina, O.I. (1993): Mobilizing Nigerian women for national development: The role of the female elites, in: African Economic History, vol. 21, pp. 1-20.[7319]

Alliances for Africa (2005): Consolidated report on the women in governance and decision-making initiative in Imo State, Nigeria, unpublished study, Alliances for Africa, London/Lagos.[7320]

Amadiume, Ifi (1996): Beyond cultural performance, Women, culture and the state in contemporary Nigerian politics, in: Parkin, David / Caplan, Lionel / Fisher, Humphrey (eds.): The politics of cultural performance, Provinence Books, Berghahn, pp. 41-59.[7321]

Awe, Bonlande (1992): Women and politics in Nigeria, in: Hofmeier, R. / Tetzlaff, R. / Wegemud, R. (Hrsg.): Afrika - Überleben in einer ökologisch gefährdeten Umwelt, Hamburg, pp. 209-221.[7322]

Ayoade, J.A.A. /and Nwabuzor, E.J. / Sambo, A. (eds.) (1991): Women and politics in Nigeria, Malthouse Press, Lagos.[7323]

Babatope, Biola (1987): Women of our society with emphasis on economic and political problems facing women in Southern Nigeria, in: Presence Africaine, 141, pp. 15-27.[7324]

Barber, Karin (1996): Going to far in Okukù, Some ideas about gender, excess, and political power, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Münster - Hamburg, pp. 71-83.[7325]

Bogunjoko, Julius O. (1991): Poverty and women development strategies: Lessons from policy targeting and public transfers in Nigeria, in: Nigerian Journal of Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 105-123.[7326]

Callaway, Barbara (1987): Women and political participation in Kano City, in: Comparative Politics, vol. 19, pp. 379-393.[7327]

Callaway, Barbara (1988): Contrasting socialization of Igbo and Hausa women and political efficacy, in: Women and Politics, vol. 8, pp. 45-68.[7328]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1984): The heritage of Islam: Women, religion and politics in West Africa, Lynne Rienner, Boulder.[7329]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1989): Women and state in Islamic West Africa, in: Charlton, Ellen et al. (eds.): Women, state and development, Suny Press, St. Albany, pp. 96-113.[7330]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1994): Islam – Women, religion and politics in West Africa, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder.[7331]

Coulon, Virginia (1990): Women at war, Nigerian women writers and the civil war, in: Commonwealth, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 1-12.[7332]

Dennis, Carolyne (1987): Women and the state in Nigeria: The case of the Federal Military Government 1984-85, in: Haleh, Afshar (ed.): Women, state and ideology, Suny Press, London, pp. 13-27.[7334]

Denzer, La Ray (1989): Women in government service in colonial Nigeria, 1862-1945, Working Papers, no. 136, African Studies Centre, Boston.[7333]

Eames, Elizabeth (1988): Why women went to war, Women and wealth in Ondo town, Southwestern Nigeria, in. Clark, Garcia (ed.): Traders versus state, Anthropological approaches to unofficial economics, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 81-97.[7335]

Ebijuwa, Temisanren (1993): Abortion, women and the national development, The Nigerian example, in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 33-55.[7336]

Ekejuiba, Felicia (1993): Women’s participation in democratization process in Nigeria, Working Paper, no. 163, African Studies Centre, Boston University, Boston.[7337]

Elabor-Idemudia, Patience (1991): The impact of structural adjustment programs on women and their households in Bendel and Ogun State, Nigeria, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 128-139.[7338]

Emovon, Adesuwa (1997): Women of power, A study of market women`s associations in Benin City, Bendel State, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 203-214.[7339]

Fardon, Richard (1984): Sisters, wives, wards and daughters, A transformational analysis of the political organisation of the Tiv and their neighbours, in: Africa, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 2-21.[7340]

Gabriel, Amakievi (1994): A better life program for rural women in a developing nation, in: James, Valentine Udho (ed.): Environmental and economic dilemmas of developing countries, Africa in the twenty-first century, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 197-215.[7341]

Gilman, Lisa (2011): The dance of politics, Gender, performance, and democratization in Malawi, Temple Press, Philadelophia.[7342]

Hanna, J.L. (1990): Dance, protest and women’s wars: Cases from Nigeria and the United States, in: West, G. / Blumberg, R.L. (eds.): Women and social protest, Oxford University Press, New York - Oxford, pp. 333-345.[7343]

Ibeanu, Okechekwu (2001): Healing and changing, The changing identities of women in the aftermath of the Ogoni crisis in Nigeria, in: Meintjes, Sheila / Pillay, Anu / Turshen, Meredeth (eds.): The aftermath, Women in post-conflict transformation, Zed Books, London, pp. 189-209.[7344]

Ibrahim, Jibrin (2004): First lady syndrome and the marginalisation of women from power, Opportunities or compromises for gender equality? in: Feminist Africa, 3, pp. 48-69.[7345]

Ikelegbe, Augustine (2005): Engendering civil society, Oil, women`s groups and resource conflicts in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 241-270.[7346]

Ilesanmi, T.M. (1998): The significance of the myths of women in socio-political role sharing among Yoruba people, in: Kolawole, Mary E.M. (ed.): Gender perceptions and development in Africa, Arrabon Academic Publishers, Lagos.[7352]

Imam, Ayesha (1993): Women should neither be seen nor heard? Politics, Islam and women in Kano, Northern Nigeria, in: Moghadam, Valentine (ed.): Identity politics and women, cultural reassertions and feminism in international perspective, Boulder, pp.123-144.[7347]

Imam, Ayesha (1994): Politics, Islam and women in Kano, Northern Nigeria, in: Moghadam, Valentine (ed.): Identity politics and women, Cultural reassertions and feminism in international perspective, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 123-143.[7348]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): The dynamics of WINing: An analysis of women in Nigeria (WIN), in: Alexander, Jacqui M. / Mohnaty, Chandra Talpade (eds.): Feminist genealogies, colonial legacies, democratic futures, New York, pp. 280-307.[7349]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): `Il wan bi President...: Gender politics and discourses of democracy in Nigeria, in: Robinson, Pearl / Newbery, Catherine / Diouf, Mamadou (eds.): Transitions in Africa, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[7350]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): Muslim women in Nigerian politics, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 1.[7351]

Johnson, Christiana (2003): Nigeria: Illegal logging & forest women’s resistance, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 30, no. 95, pp. 156-162.[7353]

Jordan Smith, Daniel (2005): Legacies of Biafra, Marriage, ‘home people’ and reproduction among the Igbo of Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 30-45.[7354]

Mama, Amina (1995): Feminism or femocracy? State feminism and democratisation in Nigeria, in: Africa Development, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 37-58.[7355]

Mama, Amina (1998): Khaki in the family, Gender discourses and militarism in Nigeria, in: African Studies Review, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 1-18.[7356]

Mba, Nina Emma (1982): Nigerian women mobilized, women political activity in Southern Nigeria, 1900-1965, University of California Press, Berkeley.[7357]

Mba, Nina Emma (1990): Kaba and Khaki, Women and the militarized state in Nigeria, in: Parpart, Jane / Staudt, Kathleen (eds.): Women and the state in Africa, Lynne Reinner, Boulder, pp. 69-90.[7358]

Nna, Nkebari (2005): Gender and political disempowerment of women in Rivers State, Case study of Port Harcourt Local Government Area, in: Gender and Behaviour, vol. 3, pp. 423-441.[7359]

Nnaemeka, Obioma (1997): Fighting on all fronts: Gendered spaces, ethnic boundaries, and the Nigerian civil war, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 22, pp. 235-263.[7360]

Nnaemeka, Obioma / Korieh, Chima (2011): Shaping our struggles, Nigerian women in history, culture and social change, Africa World Press, Trenton.[7361]

Nwapa, Flora (1987): Women in politics, in: Présence Africaine, Nr. 141, pp. 115-121.[7362]

Nzegwu, Nkiru (1995): Recovering Igbo traditions: A case for indigenous women’s organizations in development, in: Nussbaum, Martin / Glover, Jonathan (eds.): Women, culture and development, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp. 444-465.[7363]

Nzegwu, Nkiru (2001): Gender equality in a dual-sex system: The case of Onitsha, in: Jenda: A Journal of Culture and African Women Studies, vol. 1[7364]

Ogonor, B.O. (2003): The impact of training on the conflict resolution ability of rural women in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, in: International Journal of Lifelong Education, vol. 22, pp. 172-181.[7365]

Okeke, Philomena (1999): The first lady syndrome, The (en)gendering of bureaucratic corruption in Nigeria, in: CODESRIA Bulletin, vol. 3-4, pp. 16-19.[7366]

Okeke-Ihejirika, Philomina / Franceschet, Susan (2002): Democratization and state feminism, Gendered politics in Africa and Latin America, in: Development and Change, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 439-466.[7367]

Okonjo, Kamene (1976): The dual sex political system in operation: Igbo women and community politics in Midwestern Nigeria, in: Hafkin, Nancy /Bay, Edna (eds.): Women in Africa, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 45-48.[7368]

Okonjo, Kamene (1983): Sex roles in Nigerian politics, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, George Allen and Unwin, Boston, pp. 211-222.[7369]

Okonjo, Kamene (1985): Women's political participation in Nigeria, in: Steady, F.Ch. (ed.): Black women cross-culturally, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (Mass.), pp. 79-106.[7370]

Okonjo, Kamene (1991): Nigerian women's participation in national politics: legitimacy and stability in an era of transition / - East Lansing: Michigan State University (WID working papers, 221).[7371]

Okonjo, Kamene (1994): Reversing the marginalization of invisible and silent majority: Women in politics in Nigeria, in: Nelson, B. / Chowdhury, N. (eds.): Women and politics worldwide, Yale University Press, New Haven, pp. 285-297.[7372]

Okonkwo, Amaechi (2016): Gender and corruption in Nigerian politics, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 111-146.[7373]

Osinulu, Clara / Mba, Nina (ed.) (1998): Nigerian women in politics, 1986-1993, Malthouse Publishers, New York.[7375]

Osiruemu, Edith (2003): The feminisation of poverty and its alleviation in Nigeria, An appraisal of some government programmes, in: Humanities Review Journal, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 58-72.[7374]

Pereira, Charmaine (2005): Domesticating women? Gender, religion and the state in Nigeria under colonial military rule, in: African Identities, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 69-94.[7376]

Shettima, Kole Ahmed (1983): Women’s movement and visions in Africa development, The Nigeria Labour Congress Women’s Wing, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Male and female in West Africa, George Allen and Unwin, London. (und in: Africa Development, vol. 14, no. 3, 1989, pp. 81-98)[7377]

Shettima, Kole Ahmed (1995): Engendering Nigeria’s Third Republic, in: African Studies Review, vol. 38, no. 3, pp. 61-98.[7378]

Soetan, Funmi (1993): Mobilizing Nigerian women for national development, The role of female elites, in: African Economic History, vol. 21, pp. 1-20.[7379]

Tinuoye, M.O. (1992): The political emancipation of Nigerian women from independence to the year 2000, in: Savanna, vol. 13, no. 1 pp. 67-72.[7380]

Turner, Terisa / Oshare, M.O. (1993): Women’s uprising agrainst the Nigerian oil industry in the 1990s, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. XIV, no. 3, pp. 329-357.[7381]

Turner, Terisa / Oshare, M.O. (1994): Women’s uprising agrainst the Nigerian oil industry in the 1980s, in: Turner, Terisa (ed.): Arise y mighty people! Gender, class and race in popular struggle, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 123-160.[7382]

Uchendu, Egodi Turner, Terisa / Oshare, M.O. (2007): Women and conflict in Nigerian civil war, Africa World Press, Trenton.[7383]

Williams, Pat (1997): State, women and democratisation in Africa: The Nigerian experience (1987-1993), in: Africa Development, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 141-182.[7384]

Williams, Pat (1998): Religious fundamentalism and women's political behaviour in Nigeria, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 68-82.[7385]

Williams, Pat (2003): Federalism and the woman question in Nigeria: From submission to diversion, in: Gana, Aaron / Egwu, Samuel (eds.): Federalism in Africa, vol. 2, Africa World Press, Trenton.[7386]

WIN (1985): Women in Nigeria today, Zed Books, London.[7387]

Religion - Christianity

Bastian, Misty (2000): Young convents, Christian missions, gender and youth in Onitsha, Nigeria, 1880-1929, in: Anthropological Quarterly, vol. 73, no. 3, pp. 145-158.[7680]

Callaway, Helen (1980): Women in Yoruba tradition and in the Cherubim and Seraphin society, in: Kalu, O.U.S. (ed.): History of christianity in West Africa, London, pp. 321-332.[7681]

Crumbley, Deidre Helen (1992): Impurity and power, Women in the Aladura churches, in: Africa, vol. 62, no. 4, pp. 505-522.[7682]

Crumbley, Deidre Helen (2003): Patriarchies, prophets, and procreation, Sources of gender practices in three African churches, in: Africa, vol. 73. no. 4, pp. 585-605.[7683]

Crumbley, Deidre Helen (2008): Spirit, structure and flesh, Gendered experiences in African instituted churches among the Yoruba of Nigeria, University of Wisconsin Press, New York. [7684]

Dennis, Carolyne (1992): The christian churches and women’s experience of structural adjustment in Nigeria, in: Afshar, Haleh / Dennis, Carolyn (eds.): Women and adjustment policies in the third world, St. Martin’s Press, New York, pp. 179-204.[7685]

Erlandsson, Ulrika Bamidele (1997): In search for women`s dignity and greater freedom, Fieldwork on women and identity among the Catholic Fatima Sisters of Jos, Nigeria, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 136-147.[7686]

Gundert-Hock, Sibylle (1994): Prophetin oder Köchin? Frauenrollen in unabhängigen und in mainline-Kirchen in Nord Nigeria, in: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, vol. 119, pp. 201-248.[7687]

Hackett, R.I. J. (1985): Sacred paradoxes, Women and religious plurality in Nigeria, in: Haddad, Y. / Findley, E.B. (eds.): Women, religion, and social change, State University of New York Press, Albany.[7688]

Hock, Sibylle (1994): Prophetin oder Köchin? Frauenrollen in unabhängigen und main-line Kirchen in Nord-Nigeria, in: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, Bd. 119, pp. 201-228.[7689]

Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Wurster, Gabriele (1991): Spirual church participation as a survival strategy among urban migrant women in Southern Nigeria, in: Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (ed.): New religious movements and society in Nigeria, Bayreuth African Studies Series 17, Bayreuth.[7690]

Mann, Kristin (1983): The daughters of dependence, Christian marriage among elite women in Lagos colony, 1880-1915, in: Journal of African History, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 37-56.[7691]

Matory, Lorand (1994): Sex and the empire that is no more: Gender and the politics of metaphor in Oyo Yoruba religion, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[7692]

Matory, Lorand (1997): The kings male order bride, The modern making of a Yoruba priest, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 381-400.[7693]

Newell, Stephanie (2005): Devoting to domesticitiy, The reconfiguration of gender in popular christian pamphlets from Ghana and Nigeria, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 296-323.[7694]

Para-Mallam, Oluwafunmilayo Josephine (2006): Faith, gender and development agendas in Nigeria, Conflicts, challenges and opportunities, in: Gender and Development, vol. 14, pp. 409-421.[7695]

Peel, J. (2002): Gender in Yoruba religious change, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 1-31.[7696]

Pereira, Charmaine (2005): Domesticating women? Gender, religion and the state in Nigeria under colonial and military rule, in: African Identities, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 69-94.[7697]

Religion - Islam

Abdullah, Hussaina (1995): Wifeism and activism: the Nigerian women’s movement, in: Basu, Amrita (ed.): Women’s movement in global perspective, Boulder, Westview Press, pp. 209-225.[7879]

Abdullah, Hussaina (2002): Religious revivalism, human rights activism and the struggle for women's rights in Nigeria, in: Na'im, Abd A.A. (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 151-191.[7880]

Adamu, Abdalla Uba (1990): Balancing the equation: Girls, tradition and science educatino in Northern Nigeria, in: Ahfad Journal, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 14-31.[7878]

Adamu, Fatima (1998): Gender myth about secluded women in Hausa society of Northern Nigeria, in: Kolawole, Mary (ed.): Gender perceptions and development in Africa, Arrabon Academic Publishers, Lagos.[7881]

Adamu, Fatima (1999): A double-edged sword, Challenging women’s oppression within Muslim society in Northern Nigeria, in: Gender and Development, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 56-81.[7882]

Adamu, Fatima (2004): Haushaltsstrategien, Frauen und Sharia-Gerichtshöfe in Sokoto/Nordnigeria, in: Peripherie, Nr. 95, pp. 284-305.[7883]

Adamu, Muhammad (1993): The Muslim woman and technical education in Nigeria, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 37, pp. 287-290.[7884]

Barkow, Jerome (1972): Hausa women and Islam, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 318-328.[7885]

Besmer, Fremont (1977): Initiation into the Bori cult: A case study in Ningi town, in: Africa, vol. 47, no. 1, pp.1-13.[7886]

Beverly, Mack (1991): Royal wives in Kano, in: Coles, Catherine / Beverly, Mack (ed.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, London, pp. 100-129.[7887]

Bivins, Mary (1997): Daura and gender in the creation of a Hausa national epic, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 1-28.[7888]

Bivins, Mary (2007): Telling stories, Making histories, Women, words, and Islam in nineteenth century Hausaland and the Sokoto Caliphate, Heinemann Publishers, London.[7889]

Bossaller, Anke (1994): Kwatacce- ‘Schlafende Schwangerschaft’ bei den Hausa, in: Curare, 17, pp. 171-180.[7890]

Bossaller, Anke (2005): Nigeria - Steinigungsurteile, in: Inamo, Nr. 41, pp. 27-29.[7891]

Bovin, Mette (1983): Muslim women at the peripherie, The West African Sahel, in: Utas, Bo (ed.): Women in islamic societies, Social attitudes and historical perspectives, London, Curson Press, pp. 66-99.[7892]

Boyd, Jean (1986): Conflicting interests which influence Hausa women, in: Breitinger, Eckhard / Sander, Reinhard (eds.): Language and education in Africa, African Studies Series, Bayreuth University, Bayreuth, pp. 25-46.[7893]

Boyd, Jean (1989): The caliph’s sister, Nana Asmau, 1793-1865, Teacher, poet and Islamic leader, Frank Cass, London.[7894]

Boyd, Jean (1997): We teach girls that it is wrong to carry babies on their backs! Or how inappropriate policies damaged girls' education in colonial era, in: Tsiga, Ismaila / Adamu, Abdalla (eds.): Islam and the history of learning in Katsina, Spectrum Books/African Books Cooperative, Ibadan.[7895]

Boyd, Jean / Last, Murry (1985): The role of women as „agents religieux“ in Sokoto, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 283-300.[7896]

Boyd, Jean / Mack, Beverly (1996): Women's Islamic literature in Northern Nigeria, 150 years of tradition, in: Harrow, Kenneth W. (ed.): The marabout and the muse: New aspects of Islam in African literature, Heinemann, Portsmouth. [7897]

Boyd, Jean / Mack, Beverly (1997): Collected works of Nana Asmau, Daughter of Usman dan Fodio (1793-1864), University of Michigan Press, East Lansing.[7898]

Callaway, Barbara (1984): Ambigiuos consequences of the socialization and seclusion of Hausa women, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, 22, pp. 429-450.[7899]

Callaway, Barbara (1986): Education and participation of Hausa Muslim women in Nigeria, Women and International Development Working Papers no. 129, Michigan State Univerity, East Lansing.[7900]

Callaway, Barbara (1987): Muslim Hausa women in Nigeria - Tradition and change, Syracuse University Press, Syracuse / New York.[7901]

Callaway, Barbara (1987): Women and political participation in Kano City, in: Comparative Politics, vol. 19, pp. 379-393.[7902]

Callaway, Barbara (1994): Hausa socialisation, in: Brettell, Caroline / Sargent, Carolyn (eds.): Gender in cross-cultural perspective, Prentice Hall, pp.116-129 (aus: Callaway, Barbara: Muslim Hausa women in Nigeria - Tradition and change, New York, 1987, pp. 28-25.)[7903]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1984): The heritage of Islam: Women, religion and politics in West Africa, Lynne Rienner, Boulder.[7904]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1989): Women and state in Islamic West Africa, in: Charlton, Ellen et al. (eds.): Women, state and development, Suny Press, St. Albany, pp. 96-113.[7905]

Callaway, Barbara / Creevey, Lucy (1994): Islam – Women, religion and politics in West Africa, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder.[7906]

Callaway, Barbara / Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Law, education and social change, Implications of Muslim Hausa women in Nigeria, in: Iglitzin, Lynne / Ross, Ruth (eds.): Women in the world, 1975-1985, Clio Press, Oxford, pp. 181-195.[7907]

Coles, Catherine (1983): Urban Muslim women and social change in Northern Nigeria, Women and International Development Working Papers no. 19, Michigan State Univerity, East Lansing.[7908]

Coles, Catherine (1990): The older women in Hausa society, Power and authority in urban Nigeria, in: Sokolovsky, Jay (ed.): The cultural context of aging, World-wide perspectives, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, New York, pp. 57-81.[7909]

Coles, Catherine (1996): Three generations of Hausa women in Kaduna, Nigeria, 1925-1985, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 73-102.[7910]

Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.) (1991): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.[7911]

Cooper, Barbara (1998): Gender and religion in Hausaland, Variations in Islamic practice in Niger and Nigeria, in: Bodman, Herbert / Tohidi, Nayereh (eds.): Women in Muslim societies, Diversity within unity, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp. 21-37.[7912]

Cooper, Barbara (2001): The strength in the song, Muslim personhood, audible capital, and Hausa women’s performance of the Hajj, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Gendered modernities, Ethnographic perspectives, Palgrave Publications, New York, pp. 79-104.[7913]

Csapo,Marg (1981): Religious, social and economic factors hindering the education of girls in Northern Nigeria, in: Comparative Education, 17, pp. 311-319.[7914]

Dangana, Muhammad (1999): The intellectual contribution of Nana Asma'u to women's education in nineteenth-century Nigeria, in: Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 285-290.[7915]

Fisher, Humphrey (1991): Slavery and seclusion in Northern Nigeria, A further note, in: Journal of African History, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 123-135.[7916]

Hill, Polly (1969): Hidden trade among the Hausa, in: Man, 4, pp. 392-409.[7917]

Hutson, A.S. (1999): The development of women’s authority in the Kano Tijaniyya, 1894-1963, in: Africa Today, voo. 46, 3-4, pp. 43-64.[7918]

Imam, Ayesha (1991): The development of women’s seclusion in Hausaland, Northern Nigeria, in: Women Living under Muslim Law Dossier, vol. 9/10, pp. 4-18.[7919]

Imam, Ayesha (1993): Women should neither be seen nor heard? Politics, Islam and women in Kano, Northern Nigeria, in: Moghadam, Valentine (ed.): Identity politics and women, cultural reassertions and feminism in international perspective, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 123-144.[7920]

Imam, Ayesha (1994): Politics, Islam and women in Kano, Northern Nigeria, in: Moghadam, Valentine (ed.): Identity politics andwomen, Cultural reassertionis and feminism in international perspective, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 123-143.[7921]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): The dynamics of WINing: An analysis of women in Nigeria (WIN), in: Alexander, Jacqui M. / Mohnaty, Chandra Talpade (eds.): Feminist genealogies, colonial legacies, democratic futures, Routledge Publishers, New York, pp. 280-307.[7922]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): `Il wan bi President...: Gender politics and discourses of democracy in Nigeria, in: Robinson, Pearl / Newbery, Catherine / Diouf, Mamadou (eds.): Transitions in Africa, Oxford University Press, Oxford. [7923]

Imam, Ayesha (1997): Muslim women in Nigerian politics, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 41, no. 1.[7924]

Imam, Ayesha (2002): Of laws, religion and women’s rights, Women’s rights in Muslim laws (Sharia), Islamisation in secular Nigeria, Implications for women’s rights, Women living under Muslim Law, London.[7925]

Kleiner-Bossaller, Anke (1995): Die Stellung der Frau in der Hausagesellschaft, Ein brüchig gewordener Konsens, in: Abu-Nasr, J.M. (ed.): Muslime in Nigeria, Religion und Gesellschaft im politischen Wandel seit den 1950er Jahren, Beiträge zur Afrikaforschung, 4, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 269-284.[7927]

Kleiner-Bossaller, Anke (2005): Nigeria - Steinigungsurteile, in: Inamo, Nr. 41, pp. 27-29.[7928]

Kleiner-Bossaller, Anke / Loimeier, Roman (1995): Radical Muslim women and male politics in Nigeria, in: Reh, Mechthild / Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Lit-Verlag, Münster, pp. 61-70.[7929]

Kleis, Gerald / Abdullahi, Salisu (1983): Masculine power and gender ambiguity in urban Hausa society, in: African Urban Studies, vol. 16, pp. 39-53.[7930]

Krings, Matthias (1998): Geister des Feuers, Zur Imagination des Fremden im Bori-Kult der Hausa, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[7931]

Lewis, I.M. / Al-Safi, A. / Hurreiz, S. (eds.) (1991): Women’s medicine, The Zar-Bori cult in Africa and beyond, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.[7926]

Mack, Beverly (1991): Royal wives of Kano, in: Coles, C. / Mack, B. (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 109-129.[7936]

Mack, Beverly (1997): Authority and influence in Kano Harem, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 159-172.[7937]

Mack, Beverly (1983): ‘Waka daya ba ta kare nika’, one song will not finish the grinding, Hausa women’s oral literature, in: Wylie, Hal (ed.): Contemporary African literature, Three Continents Press, Washington, D.C., pp. 15-46.[7932]

Mack, Beverly (1986): Songs from silence, Hausa women’s poetry, in: Davies Boyce, Carole / Graves, Anne Adams (eds.): Ngambika, Studies of women in African literature, Africa World Press, New Jersey, pp. 181-190.[7933]

Mack, Beverly (1988): Hahjiya Ma’daki: A royal Hausa woman, in: Romero, Patricia (ed.): Life histories of African women, Ashfield Press, London, pp. 47-77.[7934]

Mack, Beverly (1990): Services and status, Slaves and concubines in Kano, Nigeria, in: Sanjek, Roger / Colen, Shellee (eds.): At work in homes, Household workers in world perspective, Publications of the American Anthropological Association, Washington, pp. 14-34.[7935]

Mack, Beverly / Boyd, Jean (2000): One women’s Jihad, Nana Asma’u, Scholar and scribe, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[7938]

Nast, Heidi (2004): Concubines and power: Five hundred years in a Northern Nigerian palace, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[7939]

Ogungbile, David (2004): Religious experience and women leadership in Yoruba (Nigeria) Islam: A case study of Alhaja Sheidat Mujidat Adeoye, Founder and Leader of the Fadilullah Muslim Mission, Osogbo, Nigeria, in: Gender and Behaviour, vol. 2, pp. 117-140.[7941]

Onwuejeogwu, Michaeal (1969): The cult of the Bori spirits among the Hausa, in: Douglas, M. / Kaberry, Ph. (eds.): Man Africa, Tavistock Publications, London, pp. 279-305.[7942]

O’Brien, M. (2001): Gender, Islam and hierarchies of treatment in post-colonial Northern Nigeria, in: Interventions, International Journal of Post-Colonial Studies, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 222-241.[7940]

Pierce, Steven (2003): Farmers and ‘prostitutes’: Twentieth-century problems of female inheritance in Kano Emirate, Nigeria, in: Journal of African History, vol. 44, pp. 463-486.[7943]

Pittin, Rene (1983): Houses of women: A focus on alternative life-styles in Katsina city, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, Allan and Unwin Publications, London, pp. 291-302.[7944]

Pittin, Rene (1990): Selective education: Issues of gender, class and ideology in Northern Nigeria, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 48, pp. 7-25.[7945]

Platte, Editha (2000): Frauen in Amt und Würden, Handlungsspielräume muslimischer Frauen im ländlichen Nordostnigeria, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[7946]

Porter, Gina (1989): A note on slavery, Seclusion and agrarian change in Northern Nigeria, in: Journal of African History, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 487-491.[7947]

Renne, Elisha (2004): Gender roles and women’s status, What they mean to Hausa Muslim women in Northern Nigeria, in: Szreter, S. / Dharmalingam, A. / Sholkamy, H. (eds.): Qualitative demography, Categoreis and contexts in population studies, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[7948]

Renne, Elisha (2018): Veils, turbans, and Islamic reform in Northern Nigeria, Indiana University Press, Bloomington. [7949]

Robson, Elsbeth (2000): Wife seclusion and the special praxis of gender ideology in Nigerian Hausaland, in: Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 179-199.[7950]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Children as entrepreneurs - Case studies from Kano, Nigeria, in: Greenfield, S. / Stickon, A. (eds.): Entrepreneurs and social change, University Press of America, Lanham, pp. 195-223.[7951]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Widows in Hausa society, Ritual phase or social status, in: Potash, B. (eds.): Widows in African societies, Choises and constraints, Stanford, Stanford University Press, pp. 131-152.[7952]

Schildkrout, Enid (1987): Age and gender in Hausa society: Socio-economic roles of children in urban Kano, in: Fontaine, J.S. (ed.): Sex and age as priniciples of social differentiation, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 109-137.[7953]

Schildkrout, Enid (1982): Dependency and autonomy: The economic activities of secluded Hausa women in Kano, Nigeria, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 55-82.[7954]

Schildkrout, Enid (1988): Hajiya Hussaina, Notes on the life history of a Hausa woman, in: Romero, Patricia (ed.): Life histories of African women, London, pp. 78-95.[7955]

Smith, Mary (1965): Baba of Kano: A women of the Muslim Hausa, Farber and Farber Press, New York.[7956]

Sow, Fatou (1985): Muslim families in contemporary black Africa, in: Current Anthropology, vol. 26, no.5, pp. 563-570.[7957]

Stephans, Connie (1991): Marriage in the Hausa Tatsuniya tradition, a cultural and cosmic balance, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 221-231.[7958]

Steven Pierce (2007): Identity, performance, and secrecy, Gendered life and the modern in Northern Nigeria, in: Feminist Studies, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 539-565. [11698]

Sullivan, Joanna (2005): Exploring 'bori' as a site of myth in Hausa culture, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 271-282.[7959]

Tertsakian, Carina (2004): Nigeria: `Political shari'a'? Human rights and Islamic law in Northern Nigeria Human Rights Watch, New York.[7960]

Thomas-Emeagwali, Gloria (1994): Islam and gender: The Nigerian case, in: Fawzi El Solh, Camilla / Mabro, Judy (eds.): Muslim women’s choises, Religious belief and social reality, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 73-84.[7961]

Umah, M.S. (2004): Mass Islamic education and emergence of a female ‘ulama’ in Northern Nigeria, Backgrounds, trends and consequences, in: Reese, S.S. (eds.): The transmission of learning in Islamic Africa, Brill Publishers, Leiden.[7962]

VerEecke, Catherine (1989): From pasture to purdah: The transformation of women’s roles and identities among the Adamawa Fulbe, in: Ethnology, vol. 28, pp. 53-73.[7963]

VerEecke, Catherine (1993): ‘It is better to die than to be shamed’, Cultural and moral dimensions of women’s trading in an Islamic Nigerian society, in: Anthropos, 88, pp. 403-417.[7964]

VerEecke, Catherine (1995): Muslim women traders of Northern Nigeria: Perspectives from the city of Yola, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, James Currey Publishers, London, pp. 59-79.[7965]

Werthmann, Katja (1995): Eingeschlossene Frauen? Seklusion in Nordnigeria, Ideologie und Alltagspraxis, in: Fleisch, A. / Otten, D. (eds.): Sprachkulturelle und historische Forschungen in Afrika, Beiträge des 11. Afrikanistentage in Köln, Köppe Verlag, Köln, pp. 327-334.[7966]

Werthmann, Katja (1995): Die Frauen der Baracks, Identitätsmanagement in einer nordnigerianischen Grossstadt, in: Sociologus, no. 45, 2, pp. 169-180.[7967]

Werthmann, Katja (1997): Nachbarinnen - Die Alltagswelt muslimischer Frauen in einer nigerianischen Großstadt, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[7968]

Werthmann, Katja (1997): „Strebe nach Wissen, selbst wenn es in China ist!“ Muslimische Frauen und säkulare Bildung in Nordnigeria, Arbeitspapiere zu afrikanischen Gesellschaften, No. 20, Institut für Ethnologie, FU-Berlin, Berlin.[7969]

Werthmann, Katja (1998): Handel, Handwerk, Herumsitzen, Arbeit und Statusproduktion bei muslimischen Frauen in Nord-Nigeria, in: Schmidt, Heike / Wirz, Albert (Hg.): Afrika und das Andere, Alterität und Innovation, Lit-Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 94-102.[7970]

Werthmann, Katja (2000): ‚Seek for knowledge, even if it is in China’, Muslim women and secular education in Northern Nigeria, in: Salter, Thomas / King, Kenneth (eds.): Africa, Islam, and development, Islam and Development in Africa - African Islam, African development, Publications of the Centre for African Studies, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, pp. 253-270.[7971]

Werthmann, Katja (2002): Matan Bariki, “Women of the Barraks”, Muslim Hausa women in an urban neighbourhood in Northern Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 112-130.[7972]

Werthmann, Katja (2005): Das Vorbild Nana Asmau, in: E und Z, Jg. 46, Nr. 3, pp. 108-111.[7973]

Werthmann, Katja (2006): Urban space, gender, and identity, A neighbourhood of Muslim women in Kano (Nigeria), in: Dijk, Rijk van / Foeken, Dick (eds.): Crisis and creativity, Exploring the wealth of the African neighbourhood, Brill Publishers, Leiden, pp. 119-141.[7974]

Whitsitt, Novian (2003): Islamic Hausa feminism meets Northern Nigerian romance, The cautious rebellion of Bilkisu Funtuwa, in: African Studies Review, vol. 46, no. 1, pp. 137-155.[7975]

Williams, Pat (1997): State, women and democratisation in Africa: The Nigerian experience (1987-1993), in: Africa Development, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 141-182.[7976]

Williams, Pat (1998): Religious fundamentalism and women's political behaviour in Nigeria, in: Islamic Quarterly, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 68-82.[7977]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Abdullah, Hussaina (2002): Religious revivalism, human rights activism and the struggle for women's rights in Nigeria, in: Na'im, Abd A.A. (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 151-191.[10258]

Abiodun, Rowland (1989): Women in Yoruba religious images, in: African Languages and Cultures, vol. 2, pp. 1-18.[10259]

Amadiume, Ifi (1997): Re-inventing Africa, Matriarchy, religion and culture, Zed-Books, London.[10260]

Bastian, Misty (1997): Married in the water, Spirit kin and other afflictions of modernity in Southeastern Nigeria, in: The Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 116-134.[10261]

Beneduce, Roberto / Taliani, Simona (2006): Embodied powers, deconstructed bodies, Spirit possession, sickness, and search for wealth in Nigerian immigrant women, in: Anthropos, vol. 101, no. 2, pp. 429-450.[10262]

Besmer, Fremont (1977): Initiation into the Bori cult: A case study in Ningi town, in: Africa, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 1-13.[10263]

Chiwuzie, J.C. / Okolocha, C. (2001): Traditional belief systems and maternal mortality in a semi-urban community in Southern Nigeria, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 5, pp. 75-82.[10264]

Drewal, Henry (1968): Art and the perception of women in Yoruba culture, in: Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 545-567.[10265]

Drewal, Henry (1988): Mermaids, mirrors and snake charmers, Igbo Mammi Water shrines, in: African Arts, vol. XXI, no. 2, pp. 38-45.[10266]

Drewal, Henry (1988): Performing the other, Mammy Water worship in West Africa, in: Drama Review, 118, pp. 160-185.[10267]

Drewal, Henry (1989): Dancing for Ogun in Yorubaland and in Brazil, in: Barnes, Sandra T. (ed.): Africa's Ogun: Old world and new, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 199-234.[10268]

Drewal, Henry John / Drewal, Margaret Thompson (1983): Gelede, Art and female power among the Yoruba, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[10269]

Driesen, I.H. van den (1972): Some observations on the family unit, religion and the practice of polygyny in the Ife division of Western Nigeria, in: Africa, no. 42, pp. 44-56.[10270]

Frank, Barbara (1995): Permitted and prohibited wealth, Commodity processing spirits, Economic morals, and the goddess Mami Wata in West Africa, in: Ethnology, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 331-346.[10271]

Frank, Barbara (2004): Gendered ritual dualism in a partilineal society, Opposition and complementary in Kulere fertility cults, in: Africa, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. 217-240.[10272]

Hoch-Smith, Judith (1978): Radical Yoruba female sexuality, The witch and the prostitute, in: Hoch-Smith, Judith /Spring, Anita (eds.): Women in ritual and symbolic roles, New York, pp. 245-267.[10273]

Jell-Bahlsen, Sabine (1997): Eze Mrimi Di Egwu, The water monarch is awesome, Reconsidering Mammy Water myths, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 103-134.[10274]

Jell-Bahlsen, Sabine (1997): Female power, Water pristresses of the Oru Igbo, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): Sisterhood, feminism, and power, Africa World Press, Trenton.[10275]

Kalu, Ogbu (1991): Gender ideology in Igbo religion: The changing religious role of women in Igboland, in: Africa (Rome),vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 184-202.[10276]

Kassam, Aneesa / Bashuna, Ali Balla (2004): Gendered ritual dualism in a patrilineal society, Opposition and complementary in Kulere fertility cults, in: Africa, vol. 74, no. 2, pp. 217-240[10277]

Lewis, I.M. / Al-Safi, A. / Hurreiz, S. (eds.) (1991): Women’s medicine, The Zar-Bori cult in Africa and beyond, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh.[10278]

Lincoln, Bruce (1975): The religious significance of women’s scarification among the Tiv, in: Africa, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 45-61.[10279]

Matory, Lorand (1994): Sex and the empire that is no more, Gender and the politics of metaphor in Oyo Yoruba religion, Minneapolis University Press, Minneapolis.[10280]

Matory, Lorand (1997): The kings male order bride, The modern making of a Yoruba priest, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 381-400.[10281]

Matory, Lorand (2003): Gendered agendas, The secrets scholars keep about Yorùbá Atlantic religion, in: Gender and History, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 409-439.[10282]

Odugbesan, Clara (1969): Femininity in Yoruba religious art, in: Douglas, Mary / Kaberry, Phyllis (esd.): man in Africa, London, pp. 199-211.[10283]

Olajube, Oyeronke (2003): Women in the Yoruba religious sphere, State University of New York Press, New York.[10285]

Olaoba, O.B. (2002): The female factor in Yoruba traditional festivals, in: Humanities Review Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 21-31.[10284]

Omari-Obayemi, Mikelle (1996): An indigenous anatomy of power and art, a new look at Yoruba women in society and religion, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 21, pp. 89-98.[10286]

Peel, J.D. (2002): Gender in Yoruba religious change, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 32, no. 2, pp. 1-31.[10287]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Ilika, A. /Anthony, I. (2005): Women’s perception of partner violence in a rural Igbo community, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 77-88.[10493]

Ladebo, Olubgenga Jelil (2003): Sexual harassment in academic in Nigeria, How real? in: African Sociological Review, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 117-161. [10494]

Ogunjuyibge, O. Akinlo, Ambrose / Ebigboa, Joshua (2005): Violence against women, An examination of men’s attitudes and perceptions about wife beating and contraceptive use, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 40, pp. 219-229.[10495]

Sa’ad, Abdul-Mumin (2001): Traditional institutions and the violence of women’s human rights in Africa: The Nigerian case, in: Rwomire, Apollo (ed.): African women and children, Crisis and response, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 67-90.[10496]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Abdullah, Hussaina (2002): Religious revivalism, human rights activism and the struggle for women's rights in Nigeria, in: Na'im, Abd A.A. (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 151-191.[11165]

Abdullah, Hussaina / Hamza, Ibrahim (2003): Women and land in Northern Nigeria, The need for independent ownership rights in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land in Africa: Culture, religion and realizing women's rights, Zed Books, London, pp. 133-175.[11166]

Adamu, Fatima (2004): Haushaltsstrategien, Frauen und Sharia-Gerichtshöfe in Sokoto/Nordnigeria, in: Peripherie, Nr. 95, pp. 284-305.[11167]

Akande, Jade / Kuye, Priscilla (1986): Nigeria – Family law project, in: Schuler, Margaret (ed.): Empowerment and the law, Strategies of Third World Women, OEF Publications, Washington D.C., pp. 335-342.[11168]

Bossaller, Anke (2005): Nigeria, Steinigungsurteile, in: Inamo, Nr. 41, pp. 27-29.[11169]

Callaway, Barbara / Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Law, education and social change, Implications of muslim Hausa women in Nigeria, in: Iglitzin, Lynne / Ross, Ruth (eds.): Women in the world, 1975-1985, Clio Press, Oxford, pp. 181-195.[11170]

Christelow, Alan (1991): Women and the law in early twentieth century Kano, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 130-144.[11171]

Dawuni, Jarpa (ed.) (2021): Gender, Judging and the Courts in Africa, Selected studies, Routledge, London.[11638]

Ene, Ebele (1998): Family planning, fertility control and the law in Nigeria, The choices for a new century, in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 2, pp. 82-95.[11172]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1997): “Runaway wives”, Native law and custom in Benin, and early colonial courts, Nigeria, in: Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (ed.): Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestresses, and power, Case studies in African gender, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, New York, pp. 245-314.[11173]

Mann, Kristin (1981): Marriage choices among the educated African elite in Lagos colony, 1880-1915, in: Journal of African Historical Studies, 14, 2, pp. 37-56.[11174]

Mann, Kristin (1982): Women’s land rights in law and practice, Marriage dispute settlement in colonial Lagos, in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston University Papers, Boston, pp. 151-171.[11175]

Ngwake, J. (2002): Researching women’s economic, social and cultural rights, Challenges and strategies in Nigeria, in: Candian Journal of Women and Law, 14, pp. 1-42.[11176]

Nzegwu, N. (2002): Gender equality in dual sex system, The case of Onitsha, in: Jenda, A Journal of Culture and Women`s Studies, vol. 1, 1.[11177]

Okeke, Philomena (2000): Reconfiguring tradition: Women’s rights and social status in contemporary Nigeria, in: Africa Today, vol. 47, no. 1, pp. 49-63.[11178]

Okome, Mojbol O. (2002): Domestic, regional and international protection of Nigerian women against discrimination, Constraints and possibilities, in: African Studies Quarterly, vol. 6, issue 3, pp. 1-12.[11179]

Pierce, Steven (2003): Farmers and ‘prostitutes’: Twentieth-century problems of female inheritance in Kano Emirate, Nigeria, in: Journal of African History, vol. 44, pp. 463-486.[11180]

Sa’ad, Abdul-Mumin (2001): Traditional institutions and the violence of women’s human rights in Africa: The Nigerian case, in: Rwomire, Apollo (ed.): African women and children, Crisis and response, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp. 67-90.[11181]

Tertsakian, Carina (2004): Nigeria: `Political shari'a'? Human rights and Islamic law in Northern Nigeria Human Rights Watch, New York.[11182]

Zabel, Shirley (1969): Legislative history of the Gold Coast and Nigerian Marriage Ordinance, part 1 and 2, in: Journal of African Law, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 64-79 and vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 158-217.[11183]

society - families marriages

Aborampah, Osei-Mensah (1987): Plural marriage and fertility differentials: A study of the Yoruba of Western Nigeria, in: Human Organization, vol. 46, 1, pp. 28-38.[8753]

Adeoku, Lawrence (1982): Marital sexual relationships and birth spacing among two Yoruba sub-groups, in: Africa, vol. 52, no. 4, pp. 1-14.[8754]

Akande, Jade / Kuyu, Priscilla (1986): Nigeria, Family law project, in: Schuler, Margaret (ed.): Empowerment and the law, Strategies of third world women, OEF Publications, Washington, pp. 335-341.[8755]

Akpan, Eno-Obong (2003): Early marriage in Eastern Nigeria and the health consequences of vesico-vaginal fistulae (VVF) among young mothers, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, marriage and development, Focus on Gender, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 70-76.[8756]

Amnesty International (2005): Nigeria: Unheard voices, Violence against women in the family, London.[8757]

Andrae, Gunilla (1997): A women worker in a Lagos factory, Her power base in family, community, labour market, and union, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 69-84.[8758]

Bender, Donald, R. (1971): De facto families and de jure households in Ondo, (Yoruba), in: American Anthropologist, vol. 73, pp. 223-241.[8759]

Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Giles (eds.) (1994): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York.[8760]

Byfield, Judith (1996): Women, marriage, divorce and the emerging colonial state in Abeokuta (Nigeria) 1892-1914, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 32-51. (and published in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, 2001, pp. 27-46.)[8761]

Caldwell, J.C. / Caldwell, P. (1977): The role of marital sexual abstinence in determing fertility, A study of the Yoruba in Nigeria, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 7, pp. 193-253.[8762]

Callaway, Barbara (1984): Ambigiuos consequences of the socialization and seclusion of Hausa women, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, 22, pp. 429-450.[8763]

Callaway, Barbara (1988): Contrasting socialization of Igbo and Hausa women and political efficacy, in: Women and Politics, vol. 8, pp. 45-68.[8764]

Callaway, Barbara (1994): Hausa socialisation, in: Brettell, Caroline / Sargent, Carolyn (eds.): Gender in cross-cultural perspective, Prentice Hall, pp. 116-129 (aus: Callaway, Barbara: Muslim Hausa women in Nigeria - Tradition and change, New York, 1987, pp. 28-25.)[8765]

Chalifoux, Jean-Jacques (1980): Secondary marriage and levels of seniority among the Abisi (PITI), Nigeria, Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. XI, no. 3, pp. 325-338.[8766]

Coles, Catherine (1990): The older women in Hausa society, Power and authority in urban Nigeria, in: Sokolovsky, Jay (ed.): The cultural context of aging, World-wide perspectives, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, New York, pp. 57-81.[8767]

Coles, Catherine (1996): Three generations of Hausa women in Kaduna, Nigeria, 1925-1985, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 73-102.[8768]

Di Domenico, Catherine / de Cola, Lee / Leishman, Jennifer (1989): Urban Yoruba mothers, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth, pp. 118-132.[8769]

Driesen, I.H. van den (1972): Some observations on the family unit, religion and the practice of polygyny in the Ife division of Western Nigeria, in: Africa, no. 42, pp. 44-56.[8770]

Ekong, Sheilah Clarke (1984): Continuity and change in Nigerian family patterns, in: Afonja, Simi / Olu Pearce, Tola (eds.): Social change in Nigeria, Longman, London.[8771]

Emenyonu, Ernest N. (1988): Technique and language in Buchi Emecheta’s The Bride Price, The Slave Girl and The Joys of Motherhood, in: Journal of Commonwealth Literature, vol. 23, 1, pp. 130-141.[8772]

Eno-Obong, Akpan (2003): Early marriage in Eastern Nigeria and the health consequences of vesico-vaginal fistulae (VVF) among young mothers, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, marriage and development, Focus on Gender, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 70-76.[8773]

Ewelukwa, Uche (2002): Post-colonialism, gender, customary injustice, Widows in African societies, in: Human Rights Quarterly, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 424-486.[8774]

Ezeokana, Jude Obinna (1999): Divorce, It’s psychological effects on the divorced women and their children, A study on the Igbos of Southern Nigeria, Lang Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[8775]

Fapohunda, Eleanor / Todaro, M. (1988): Family structure, implicit contracts, and the demand for children in Southern Nigeria, in: Population and Development Review, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 571-596.[8776]

Imam, A. / Pittin, R. / Omole, H. (eds.) (1989): Women and the family in Nigeria, CODESRIA Publications, Dakar.[8777]

Ipaye, Oluwatoyin (1998): The changing pattern of family structure in Nigeria: Issues, problems and strategies for family support, in: Eekelaar, J. / Nhlapo, R.T. (eds.): The changing family: International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford.[8778]

Isiugo-Abanihe, Uche (1994): Consequences of bridewealth changes on nuptiality patterns among the Ibo of Nigeria, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Gilles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Contemporary anthropological and demographic perspectives, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp. 74-91.[8779]

Iyam, D. (1996): „Full“ men and powerful „women“: The reconstruction of gender status among the Biase of Southeastern Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 30, pp. 387-408.[8780]

Izzett, Alison (1961): Family life among the Yoruba, in: Southall, Aidan (ed.): Social change in Modern Africa, Oxford University Press, London.[8781]

Karanja, Wambui Wa (1983): Conjugal decision-making: Some data from Lagos, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and Male in West Africa, Routledge Publishers, London, pp. 236-241.[8782]

Karanja, Wambui Wa (1987): ‘Outside wives’ and ‘inside wives’ in Nigeria, A study of changing perceptions in marriages, in: Parkin, David / Nyamwaya, David (eds.): Transformations of African marriage, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp. 247-261.[8783]

Lawuyi, Olatunde (1987): Ethnic identity and sex, in: Anthropos, 82, pp. 226-232.[8784]

Lloyd, Peter (1968): Divorce among the Yoruba, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 70, pp. 67-81.[8785]

Mann, Kristin (1982): Women’s land rights in law and practice, Marriage dispute settlement in colonial Lagos, in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston University Papers, Boston, pp. 151-171.[8787]

Mann, Kristin (1983): The daughters of dependence, Christian marriage among elite women in Lagos colony, 1880-1915, in: Journal of African History, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 37-56.[8788]

Mann, Kristin (1985): Marrying well: Marriage, status and social change among the educated elite in colonial Lagos, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[8789]

Mann, Kristin (1994): The historical roots and cultural consequences of outside marriage in colonial Lagos, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Pison, Giles (eds.): Nuptiality in Sub-Saharan Africa, Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 167-193.[8790]

McCarthy, J. / Oni, G. (1987): Desired family size and its determinants among urban Nigerian women, A two-stage analysis, in: Demography, vol. 24, pp. 279-290.[8786]

Muller, Jean-Claude (1972): Ritual marriage, symbolic fatherhood and initiation among the Rubuka, Plateau-Benue State, Nigeria, in: Man, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 283-295.[8791]

Muller, Jean-Claude (1975): Preferential / rescriptive marriage and the function of kinship systems, The Rukuba case (Benue-Plateau State) Nigeria, in: American Anthropologist, 75, pp. 1563-1576.[8792]

Muller, Jean-Claude (1978): On bridewealth and meaning among the Rukuba, Plateau State, Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 161-175.[8793]

Muller, Jean-Claude (1980): On the relevance of having two husbands, Contribution to the study of polygynous/polyandrous marital forms of the Jos Plateau, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 359-369.[8794]

Netting, Robert (1969): Marital relations among the Jos Plateau of Nigeria, The politics of domesticity among the Kofyar, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 71, pp. 1037-1047.[8795]

Newell, Stephanie (2005): Devoting to domesticitiy, The reconfiguration of gender in popular christian pamphlets from Ghana and Nigeria, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 296-323.[8796]

Nwakeze, Ngozi M. (2007): The demand for children in Anambra State of Nigeria: A logit analysis, in: African Population Studies, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 167-193[8797]

Nwokocha, Ezebunwa E. (2007): Maternal crises and the role of African men: The case of a Nigerian community, in: African Population Studies, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 39-62.[8798]

Obikeze, D.S. (1987): Education and the extended family ideology: The case of Nigeria, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 18, pp. 25-45.[8799]

Okpala, Amon (1989): Female employment and family size among urban Nigeria women, in: Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 439-456.[8800]

Oppong, Christine (ed.) (1989): Sex roles, population and development, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth.[8801]

Oruwari, Yomi (1991): The changing role of women in families and their housing needs: A case study of Port Harcourt, Nigeria, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 6-12.[8802]

Renne, Elisha (1990): If men are talking, they blame it on women: A Nigerian woman’s comments on divorce and child custody, in: Feminist Issues, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 37-49.[8803]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Gender ideology and fertility strategies in an Ekiti Yourba village, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 343-353.[8804]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Condome use and the popular press in Nigeria, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 41-56.[8805]

Renne, Elisha (1993): Changes in adolescent sexuality and the perception ofvirginity in a southwestern Nigerian village, in: Health Transition Review, vol. 3, pp. 121-133.[8806]

Renne, Elisha (1996): The pregnancy that doesn't stay: The practice and perception of abortion by Ekiti Yoruba women, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 42, pp. 483-494.[8807]

Renne, Elisha (2005): Childhood memories and contemporary parenting in Ekiti, Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 75, no. 1, pp. 63-82.[8808]

Robson, Elsbeth (2000): Wife seclusion and the special praxis of gender ideology in Nigerian Hausaland, in: Gender, Place and Culture, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 179-199.[8809]

Salamone, F.A. (1976): The arrow and the bird, Proverbs in the solution of Hausa conjugal conflict, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 32, pp. 358-371.[8810]

Sangree, Walter (1969): Going home to mother, Traditional marriage among the Irigwe of Benue-Plateau State, Nigeria, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 71, no. 6, pp. 1046-1057.[8811]

Sangree, Walter (1972): Secondary marriage and tribal solidarity in Iringwe, Nigeria, in: American Anthropologist, 74, pp. 1234-1243.[8812]

Sangree, Walter (1992): Grandparenthood and modernization: The changing status of male and female elders in Tiriki, Kenya, and Irigwe, Nigeria, in: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, vol. 7, pp. 331-361.[8813]

Schildkrout, Enid (1986): Widows in Hausa society, Ritual phase or social status, in: Potash, B. (eds.): Widows in African societies, Choises and constraints, Stanford, Stanford University Press, pp. 131-152.[8814]

Schildkrout, Enid (1982): Dependency and autonomy: The economic activities of secluded Hausa women in Kano, Nigeria, in: Bay, Edna (ed.): Women and work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 55-82.[8815]

Smith, Daniel Jordan (2001): Romance, parenthood and gender in a modern African society, in: Ethnology, vol. 40, no. 2, pp. 129-152.[8817]

Smith, Daniel Jordan (2010): Promiscous girls, good wives, and cheating husbands, Gender inequality, transitions to marriage, and infidelity in Southeastern Nigeria, in: Anthropological Quarterly, vol. 83, no. 1, pp. 123-152.[8818]

Smith, Mary (1953): Secondary marriage in Northern Nigeria, in: Africa, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 298-323.[8819]

Solivetti, L.M. (1994): Family, marriage and divorce in a Hausa community, in: Africa, vol. 64, no. 2, pp. 252-271.[8816]

Southall, A.W. (1961): The position of women and the stability of marriage, in: Southall, A.W. (ed.): Social change in modern Africa, London, pp. 46-66.[8820]

Stephans, Connie (1991): Marriage in the Hausa Tatsuniya tradition, a cultural and cosmic balance, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 221-231.[8821]

Togonu-Bickersteth, Funmi (1997): Gender differences in expressed satisfaction with care from adult children among older rural Yoruba, in: Southern African Journal of Gerontology, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 3-6.[8822]

Trevor, Jean (1975): Family change in Sokoto, a traditional Fulani/Hausa city, in: Caldwell, John (ed.): Population growth and socio-economic change in West Africa, Columbia University Press, New York, pp. 236-253.[8823]

Uchendum, Victor (1965): Concubinage among Ngwa Igbo of Southern Nigeria, in: Afirca, vol. 35, pp. 187-196.[8825]

Udegbe, Bola (2004): Female (in)dependence and male dominance in contemporary Nigerian families, in: Therborn, Goran (ed.): African families in a global context, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 79-97.[8824]

Uyanga, Joseph (1976): Family size and participation of women in the labour force, A Nigerian case study, in: African Urban Notes, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 59-72.[8826]

Uzoma, A.C. (1971): The changing position of married women of one Ibo community (Nkwerre) in township and village - A socio-economic analysis, in: Vierteljahresberichte, vol. 44, pp. 58-81.[8827]

Verdon, Michael (1982): Divorce in Abutia, in: Africa, vol. 52, pp. 48-66.[8828]

Wa Karanja, Wambui (1983): Conjugal decision-making, Some data from Lagos, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, Allen and Unwin, London, pp. 236-241.[8829]

Wall, Lewis (1998): The social context of maternal mobidity and morality among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 61-89.[8830]

Ware, Helen (1979): Polygyny, Women’s views in a transitional society, Nigeria, 1975, in: Journal of Marriage and the Family, vol. 41, pp. 185-195.[8831]

Watts, Susan (1983): Marriage migration, a neglected factor of long-term mobility: A case study from Ilorin, Nigeria, in: International Migration Review, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 682-698.[8832]

Zabel, Shirley (1969): Legislative history of the Gold Coast and Nigerian Marriage Ordinance, part 1 and 2, in: Journal of African Law, vol. 13, no. 2, pp. 64-79 and vol. 13, no. 3, pp. 158-217.[8833]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Amusan, Lere / Saka, Luqman / Muinat, Adekeye (2019): Gay rights and the politics of anti-homosexuality legislation in Africa, Insights from Uganda and Nigeria, in: Journal of African Union Studies, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 45-66.[9066]

Azuah, Unoma (2016): Blessed body, The secret lives of Nigerian lesbians, gay, bisexual and transgender, Cooking Pot Publishing, Jackson TN.[9067]

Gaudio, Rudolf (2005): Male lesbians and other queen notions in Hausa, in: Cornwall, Andrea (ed.): Readings in gender in Africa, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 47-52.[9068]

Green-Simms, Lindsey (2016): The emergent queer, Homosexuality and Nigerian fiction in the 21st Century, in: Research in African Literatures, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 139-161.[11745]

Hawley, John C. (ed.) (2018): Queer theory in film and fiction, African Literature Today, ALT 36, James Currey, Melton.[9069]

Matebeni, Zethu / Munro, Surya / Reddy, Vasu (eds.) (2018): Queer in Africa, LGBTQI Identities, Citizenship, and Activism, Routledge, London.[11843]

Munro, Brenna (2017): States of emergence, Writing African female same-sex sexuality, in: Journal of Lesbian Studies, vol. 21, issue 2, pp. 186-203[11688]

Oloruntoba-Oju, Diekara (2021): ‘Like a drag or something’, Central texts as the pioneering forefront of contemporary Nigerian queerscapes, in: Africa, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 418-433. [11686]

Pierce, Steven (2016): “Nigeria can do without such perverts”, Sexual anxity and political crisis in postcolonial Nigeria, in: Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East, vol. 36, no, 1, pp. 3-20.[9070]

Sogunro, Ayodele (2018): Citizenship in the shadows, Insights on Queer advocacy in Nigeria, in: College Literature, A Journal of Critical Literary Studies vol. 45, no. 4, pp. 632-40[11734]

society - masculinities

Isigu-Abanihe, Uche (1994): Reproductive motivation and family-size preference among Nigerian men, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 163-174.[9289]

Iyam, D. (1996): „Full“ men and powerful „women“: The reconstruction of gender status among the biase of Southeastern Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 30, pp. 387-408.[9290]

Kaplan, Flora Edouwaye (1990): Männerdienst und Geheimnis am Königshof von Benin, in: Völger, Gisela / von Welck, Karin (eds.): Ethnologica, vol. 15, no. 1, Cologne, pp. 25-32.[9291]

Kleis, Gerald / Abdullahi, Salisu (1983): Masculine power and gender ambiguity in urban Hausa society, in: African Urban Studies, vol. 16, pp. 39-53.[9297]

Lindsay, Lisa (1998): ‘No need ... to think of home’? Masculinity and domestic life on the Nigerian railway, c.1940-1961, in: Journal of African History, vol. 39, pp. 439-466.[9292]

Lindsay, Lisa (1999): Domesticity and difference, Male breadwinners, working women and colonial citizenship in the 1945 Nigerian strike, in: American Historical Review, vol.104, no. 3, pp. 783-812.[9293]

Lindsay, Lisa (2003): Money, marriage and masculinity on the colonial Nigerian railway, in: Lindsey, Lisa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Men and masculinities in modern Africa, Heinemann Publishers, London.[9294]

Lindsay, Lisa (2003): Working with gender, Wage labour and social change in Southwestern Nigeria, Heinemann, Porthmouth.[9295]

Lindsay, Lisa (2007): Working with gender, The emergence of the ‘male breadwinner’ in colonial Southwestern Nigeria, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp. 241-252.[9296]

Njung, George (2020): Amputated men, colonial bureaucracy, and masculinity in post-World War I colonial Nigeria, in: Journal of Social History, vol. 53, no. 3, pp. 620-643.[9298]

Ogunjimi, Bayo (1997): Masculinity: The military, women and cultural politics in Nigeria, in: Newell, Stephanie (ed.): Writing African Women: Gender, popular culture and literature in West Africa, Zed Books, London.[9299]

Orobaton, Nosa (2000): Dimensions of sexuality among Nigerian men, Implications for fertility and reproductive health, in: Bledsoe, Caroline / Lerner, Susana / Guyer, Jane (eds.): Fertility and the male life-cycle in the era of fertility decline, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[9300]

Smith, Daniel Jordan (2017): To be a man is not a one-day job, Masculinity, money, and intimacy in Nigeria, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[11654]

society - migration and urbanisation

Adepoju, Aderanti (1984): Migration and female employment in Southwestern Nigeria, in: African Urban Studies, vol. 18, pp. 59-75.[9717]

Hollos, Marida (1991): Migration, education, and the status of women in Southern Nigeria, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 93, pp. 852-870.[9718]

Okojie, Christina (1984): Female migrants in the urban labour market: Benin City, Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 3, pp. 547-562.[9719]

Olurode, Lai (1995): Women in rural-urban migration in the town of Iwo in Nigeria, in: Baker, Jonathan / Aina, Tade Akin (eds.): The migration experience in Africa, Nordic Africa Institute Publications, Uppsala, pp. 289-302.[9720]

Oruwari, Yomi (1991): The changing role of women in families and their housing needs: A case study of Port Harcourt, Nigeria, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 6-12.[9721]

Oruwari, Yomi (2003): Planners, officials, and low income women and children in Nigerian cities: Divergent perspectives over housing and neighborhoods, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 37, no. 2-3, pp. 396-410.[9722]

Pittin, Rene (1983): Houses of women: A focus on alternative life-styles in Katsina city, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, Allan and Unwin Publications, London, pp. 291-302.[9723]

Pittin, Rene (1984): Migration of women in Nigeria, the Hausa case, in: International Migration Review, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 1293-1313.[9724]

Platte, Editha (2000): ‘Pioneers in the lake’, Female migrants in the Lake Chad region of North-Eastern Nigeria, in: Knörr, Jacqueline / Meier, Barbara (eds.): Women and migration, Anthropological perspectives, Campus Verlag, Frankfurt a.M, pp. 197-211.[9725]

Trager, Lillian (1995): Women migrants and rural-urban linkages in South-Western Nigeria, in: Baker, Jonathan / Aina, Tade Akin (ed.): The migration experience in Africa, Nordic Africa Institute Publications, Uppsala, pp. 269-288.[9726]

Watts, Susan (1983): Marriage migration, a neglected factor of long-term mobility: A case study from Ilorin, Nigeria, in: International Migration Review, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 682-698.[9727]

society - women's organisations

Abaraonye, Felicia Ihuoma (1997): Gender relations in Ibibio traditional organisations, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 22, pp.205-222.[10026]

Abdullah, Hussaina (1993): Transitional politics and the challenge of gender in Nigeria, in: Review of African Political Economy, no. 56, pp.27-37.[10027]

Abdullah, Hussaina (1995): Wifeism and activism: the Nigerian women’s movement, in: Basu, Amrita (ed.): Women’s movement in global perspective, Boulder, Westview Press, pp.209-225.[10028]

Abdullah, Hussaina (1997): Multiple identities and multiple organizing strategies of female wage workers in Kano’s manufacturing sector, in: Rosander, Eva Evres (ed.): Tranforming female identities, Women`s organisational forms in West Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp.54-68.[10029]

Abdullah, Hussaina (2002): Religious revivalism, human rights activism and the struggle for women's rights in Nigeria, in: Na'im, Abd A.A. (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 151-191.[10030]

Abdullah, Hussaina (2007): Women as emergent actors, A survey of new women’s organizations in Nigeria since the 1990s, in: Cole, Catherine / Manuh, Takyiwaa / Miescher, Stephan (eds.): Africa after gender? Indiana Unviersity Press, Bloomington, pp.150-167.[10031]

Aina, O.I. (1993): Mobilizing Nigerian women for national development: The role of the female elites, in: African Economic History, vol. 21, pp.1-20.[10032]

Awe, Bolanle (1977): The Iyaloda in the traditional Yoruba political system, in: Schlegel, Alice (ed.), Sexual Stratification, A cross-cultural view, Columbia University Press, New York, pp.144-160.[10033]

Drewal, Henry John / Drewal, Margaret Thompson (1983): Gelede, Art and female power among the Yoruba, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[10034]

Ikelegbe, Augustine (2005): Engendering civil society, Oil, women`s groups and resource conflicts in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 43, no. 2, pp.241-270.[10035]

International Alert (2004): Enhancing the capacity of women leaders of community organisations to contribute towards peace building in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria, International Alert, London.[10036]

Iweriebor, Ifeyinwa (1998): Carrying the baton: Personal perspectives on the modern women's movement in Nigeria, in: Nnaemeka, Obioma (ed.): Sisterhood, feminisms and power: From Africa to Diaspora, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 297-322.[10037]

Jeffreys, M.D.W. (1956): The Nyama society of Ibibio women, in: African Studies, vol. 15, no. 1, pp.15-28.[10038]

Ladipo, Patricia (1981): Developing women’s cooperatives: An experiment in rural Nigeria, in: Nelson, Nici (ed.): African women in the development process, Routledge Publishers, London, pp.123-136.[10039]

Ladipo, Patricia (1987): Women in a maize storage co-operative in Nigeria, Family planning, credit and technological change, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Sex roles, population and development in West Africa: Policy related studies on work and demographic issues, Portsmouth, pp.101-117.[10040]

Lucas, Emma (2001): Social development strategies of a non-governmental grassroots women's organization in Nigeria, in: International Journal of Social Welfare, vol. 10, pp.185-193[10041]

Madunagu, Bene (2008): The Nigerian feminist movement: Lessons from 'Women in Nigeria', in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 35, no. 118, pp.666-672.[10042]

Nzegwu, Nkiru (1995): Recovering Igbo traditions: A case for indigenous women’s organizations in development, in: Nussbaum, Martin / Glover, Jonathan (eds.): Women, culture and development, Claredon Press, Oxford, pp.444-465.[10043]

Osinulu, Clara / Mba, Nina (eds.) (1998): Nigerian women in politics, 1986-1993, Malthouse Publishers, Lagos/New York.[10044]

Osirim, Mary (1997): Barriers and opportunities, The role of women`s organisations in Nigerian quest of empowerment, in: Siddiqui, Rukhsana (ed.): Subsaharan Africa in the 1990s, Challenges for democracy and development, Praeger Publishers, Westport, pp.158-174.[10045]

Osirim, Mary (1998): Vehicles for change and empowerment, Urban women’s organizations in Nigeria and Zimbabwe, in: Scandinavian Journal of Development Alternatives and Area Studies, vol. 17, no. 2-3, pp.145-164.[10046]

Owoh, Kenna (2004): Democratic development: Gender insights from the grassroots in Nigeria, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 293-310.[10047]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, Traditionelle und moderne Frauenzusammenschlüsse im interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler/Herbholzheim.[10048]

Shawalu, R. (1990): Women’s movement and visions, The Nigerian Labour Congress Women’s Wing, in: Africa Development, vol. 14, no. 3.[10052]

Shebi, Esther (1997): A Nigerian sisterhood in the transformation of female identity, in: Rosander, Eva (ed.): Transforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp.123-135.[10049]

Shettima, Kole Ahmed (1983): Women’s movement and visions in Africa development, The Nigeria Labour Congress Women’s Wing, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Male and female in West Africa, George Allen and Unwin, London. (und in: Africa Development, vol. 14, no. 3, 1989, pp.81-98)[10050]

Shettima, Kole Ahmed (1995): Engendering Nigeria’s Third Republic, in: African Studies Review, vol. 38, no. 3, pp.61-98.[10051]

Sudarkasa, Niara (1973): Where women work: A study of Yoruba women in the market place and in the home, University of Michigan Press, East Lansing.[10053]

Tarfa, Sintiki (1999): Why rural technologies fail to meet the needs of Nigerian women, Evidence from Hausa women’s groups in Kano State, Nigeria, in: Afshar, Haleh (ed.): Women, globalisation and fragmentation in the developing world, St. Martin Press, New York, pp.215-225.[10054]

Trager, Lillian (1991): New women’s organizations in Nigeria, one response to structural adjustment, in: Gladwin, Christine (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp.339-358.[10055]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1987): Marktfrauen in Nigeria, Ökonomie und Politik im Leben der Yoruba-Händlerinnen, Veröffentlichungen aus dem Institut für Afrikakunde, Hamburg.[10056]

Zdunnek, Gabriele (1990): Tendenzen struktureller Veränderungen im informellen Sektor am Beispiel von Frauenarbeitsbereichen in Ibadan (Nigeria), in: Boehm, Ulrich / Kappek, Robert (Hg.): Kleinbetriebe des informellen Sektors und Ausbildung im subsaharischen Afrika, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg, pp.55-68[10057]

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