Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Niger

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Creevey, Lucy (2002): Structural adjustment and the empowerment (or disempowerment) of women in Niger and Senegal, in: Datta, Rekha / Kornberg, Judith (eds.): Women in developing countries: Assessing strategies for empowerment, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp.93-112.[755]

Diarra, Mathe (2006): Landless women, hopeless women? Gender, land and decentralisation in Niger, IIED, London.[756]

Hopkins, Jane / Levin, Carol / Haddad, Lawrence (1994): Women’s income and household expenditure patterns: Gender or flow? Evidence from Niger, in: American Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 76, no. 5, pp.1219-1225.[757]

Hulshof, Marian / Sagnia, Sagnia (2003): Women, pesticide use and access to information: Experiences from Niger, in: Jacobs, Miriam / Dinham, Barbara (eds.): Silent invaders, Pesticides, livelihoods and women’s health, Zed Books, London, pp.58-68.[758]

Knissel-Weber, Anja (1989): Zwischen Subsistenz- und Marktwirtschaft - Haussa-Dorfgemeinschaften, Familienbudgets und Märkte in Niger, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg.[759]

Lamers, J.P.A. et al. (1994): Trees for agroforestry systems in Niger: Researchers' gains through local knowledge of men and women, in: Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.179-191.[760]

arts and culture

Cooper, Barbara (2001): The strength in the song, Muslim personhood, audible capital, and Hausa women’s performance of the Hajj, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Gendered modernities, Ethnographic perspectives, Palgrave Publications, New York, pp. 79-104.[1502]

Rasmussen, Susan (1997): Politics and poetics of Tuareg aging, Life course and personal dignity in Niger, Northern Illinois Press, De Kelb.[1503]

Rasmussen, Susan (2003): Gendered discourses and mediated modernities, Urban and rural performances of Tuareg smith women, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 59, pp. 487-509.[1504]

economy - formal and informal employment

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - Households

Hopkins, Jane / Levin, Carol / Haddad, Lawrence (1994): Women’s income and household expenditure patters: Gender or flow? Evidence from Niger, in: American Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 76, no. 5, pp. 1219-1225.[1975]

Turner, Matthew (2000): Drought, domestic budgeting and wealth distribution in Sahelian households, in: Development and Change, vol. 31, pp. 1009-1035.[1976]

economy - markets and traders

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - pastoralism

Baroin, C. (1987): The position of women in pastoral production, Daza Keshada, Republic of Niger, in: Ethnos, 52, 1-2, pp. 137-155.[2389]

Dupire, Marguerite (1993): The position of women in pastoral society (The Fulani WoDaaBe, Nomards of the Niger), in: Brettell, Caroline / Sargent, Carolyn (eds.): Gender in cross-cultural perspective, Englewood Cliffs, Prentice Hall, pp. 235-245.[2390]

Murphy, R. (1964): Social distance and the veil, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 66, pp. 1257-1274.[2391]

Murphy, R. (1967): Tuareg kinship, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 69, pp. 163-170.[2392]

Oxby, Clare (1986): Women and the allocation of herding labour in pastoral society: Southern Kel Ferwan Twareg, Niger, in: Bernus, S. et al. (eds.): Les fils et le neveu, Jeux et enjeux de la parenté touarèque, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[2393]

Oxby, Clare (1987): Women unveiled: Class and gender among Kel Ferwan Twareg (Niger), in: Ethnos, vol. 52, pp. 119-136[2394]

Oxby, Clare (1990): The living milk runs dry, The decline of a form of joint ownership and matrilineal inheritance among the Twareg (Niger), in: Baxter, P.T. / Hogg, Richard (eds.): Property, poverty and people, Changing rights in property and problems of pastoral development, Manchester University Press, Manchester, pp. 222-228.[2395]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1987): Interpreting androgynous women, Female aging and personhood among the Kel Ewey Tuareg, in: Ethnology, vol. 26, pp. 17-29.[2396]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1990): Lack of prayer, Ritual restrictions, social experience and the anthropology of menstruation among the Tuareg, in: American Ethnologist, pp. 751-769.[2397]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1991): Veiled self, transparent meanings, in: Ethnology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 101-116.[2398]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1993): Creativity, conflict and power in Tuareg spirit possession, in: Anthropology and Humanism, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 21-30.[2399]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1994): Female sexuality, social reproduction, and the politics of medical intervention in Northern Niger, in: Culture, Medicine and Psychatry, vol. 19, pp. 1-20.[2400]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1994): The ‘head dance’, contested self, and art as a balancing act in Tuareg spirit possession, in: Africa, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 74-98.[2401]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1995): Spirit possession and personhood among the Kel Ewey Tuareg, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[2402]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1995): Zarraf, A Tuareg women’s wedding dance, in: Ethnology, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 1-16.[2403]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1996): Matters of taste: Food, eating, and reflections on „the body politics“ in Tuareg society, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 52, no. 1, pp. 61-84.[2404]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1997): Politics and poetics of Tuareg aging, Life course and personal dignity in Niger, Northern Illinois Press, De Kelb.[2405]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1997): Gender and ethnicity in health care, The case or Tuareg women in Niger, in: Rosander, Eva (ed.): Transforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 115-143.[2406]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1998): Only women know trees, Medicine women and the role of herbal healing in Tuareg culture, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 54, pp. 147-171.[2407]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1998): Within the tent and at the crossroads: Travel and gender identity among the Tuareg of Niger, in: Ethnos, 26, pp. 153-182.[2408]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): From childbearers to culture-bearers: Transition to postchildbearing among Tuareg women, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 91-116.[2409]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): Exhaulted mothers, Gender, aging and post childbearing experience in a Tuareg community, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 186-206.[2410]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2001): Wedding of calm and wedding of noise, Aging performed and aging misquoted in Tuareg rites of passage, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 277-304.[2411]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2003): Gendered discourses and mediated modernities, Urban and rural performances of Tuareg smith women, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 59, pp. 487-509.[2412]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2004): `These are dirty times': Transformations of gendered space and Islamic ritual protection in Tuareg herbalists and Marabouts' Albaraka blessing powers, in: Journal of Ritual Studies, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 43-60.[2413]

Ryffel-Gericke, Christiane (1989): Vom Gewinn und Verlust von Freiheit, Aspekte der Arbeitsteilung bei den Tuareg, in: Zeitschrift für Ethnologie, 114, pp. 139-160.[2414]

Worley, B.A. (1987): Property and gender relations among the Twareg nomads, in: Nomadic People, vol. 23, pp. 31-35.[2415]

Worley, B.A. (1988): Bed poats and broad swords, Twareg women’s work parties and the dialectics of sexual conflicts, in: Randolph, Richard / Schneider, David / Diaz, May (eds.): Dialectics and gender, Anthropological approaches, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 273-287.[2416]

education schooling and tertiary education

Brown, Lynn R. et al. (1994): Rural labor--Intensive public works: Impacts of participation on preschooler nutrition: Evidence from Niger, in: American Journal of Agricltural Economics, vol. 76, no. 5, pp. 1213-1218.[2733]

Hamza, Haoua (2004): Decolonizing research on gender disparity in education in Niger: Complexities of language, culture, and homecoming, in: Mutua, Kagendo / Swadener, Beth B. (eds.): Decolonizing research in cross-cultural contexts: Critical personal narratives, State University of New York Press, New York. [2734]

Wynd, Shona (1999): Education, schooling and fertility in Niger, in: Heward, Christine / Bunwaree, Sheila (eds.): Gender, education and development, Beyond access to empowerment, Zed Books, London, pp. 101-116.[2735]

health - fgc fgm

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - HIV AIDS and gender

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - reproduction and fertility

Cotten, Niki et al. (1992): Early discontinuation of contraceptive use in Niger and The Gambia, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 18, pp. 145-149.[4681]

Heller, Alison (2018): Fistula politics, Birthing inujuries and the quest for continence in Niger, Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick.[4682]

Jaffre, Yannick / Prual, Alain (1994): Midwives in Niger, An uncomfortable position between social behaviours and health care constraits, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 1069-1073.[4683]

Janssen, Gertie (2007): Solitary births in Téra, Niger, A local quest for safety, in: Bruijn, Miriam de / Dijk, Rijk van / Gewald, Jan-Bart (eds.): Strength beyond structure, Social and historical trajectoreis of agency in Africa, Brill Publishers, Leiden, pp. 240-262.[4684]

Peterson, Sara (1999): Marriage structure and contraception in Niger, in: Journal of Biosocial Science, vol. 31, pp. 93-104.[4685]

Rasmussen, Susan (1994): Female sexuality, social reproduction, and the politics of medical intervention in Northern Niger, in: Culture, Medicine and Psychatry, vol. 19, pp. 1-20.[4686]

Rasmussen, Susan (2000): From childbearers to culture-bearers: Transition to postchildbearing among Tuareg women, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 91-116.[4687]

Soulemane, M. / Aibatoure, B. (1996): High risk abortions and their prevention in Niger, in: African Journal of Fertility, Sexuality, and Reproductive Health, vol. 1, pp. 76-79.[4688]

Usman, Hajara (1997): Reproductive health and rights, The case of Northern Nigerian Hausa women, in: Africa Development, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 79-94.[4689]

Vangeenderhuysen, C. et al. (2001): Pregnancy among single women in Niamey (Niger), in: African Journal of Reproductive Health, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 98-104.[4690]

Wawer, Maria J. (1990): Results of a contraceptive prevalence survey in Niamey, Niger, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 16, pp. 90-96.[4691]

Wynd, Shona (1999): Education, schooling and fertility in Niger, in: Heward, Christine / Bunwaree, Sheila (eds.): Gender, education and development, Beyond access to empowerment, Zed Books, London, pp. 101-116.[4692]

health

Jaffre, Yannick / Prual, Alain (1994): Midwives in Niger, An uncomfortable position between social behaviours and health care constraits, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 38, no. 8, pp. 1069-1073.[5044]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1994): Female sexuality, social reproduction, and the politics of medical intervention in Northern Niger, in: Culture, Medicine and Psychatry, vol. 19, pp. 1-20.[5045]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1997): Gender and ethnicity in health care, The case or Tuareg women in Niger, in: Rosander, Eva (ed.): Transforming female identities, Women’s organisational forms in West Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 115-143.[5046]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1998): Only women know trees, Medicine women and the role of herbal healing in Tuareg culture, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 54, pp. 147-171.[5047]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): From childbearers to culture-bearers: Transition to postchildbearing among Tuareg women, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 91-116.[5048]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): Exhaulted mothers, Gender, aging and post childbearing experience in a Tuareg community, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 186-206.[5049]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2006): Those who touch, Tuareg medicine women in anthropological perspective, Northern Illionois University Press, De Kalb/Urbana.[5050]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Cooper, Barbara (1995): Reflections on slavery, seclusion and female labour in the Maradi region of Niger in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, in: Journal of African History, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 61-78. (and published in: Cornwall, Andrea (ed.). Readings in Gender in Africa. Bloomington, Indiana/Oxford: Indiana University Press/James Currey. 2005. pp. 156-164.)[5376]

Cooper, Barbara (1995): Women’s worth and wedding gift exchange in Maradi, Niger, 1907-1989, in: Journal of African History, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 121-140.[5377]

Cooper, Barbara (1997): Marriage in Maradi: Gender and culture in a Hausa society in Niger, 1900-1989, James Currey Publications, Oxford. [5378]

Cooper, Barbara (1993): Cloth, commodity production and social capital: Women in Maradi, Niger, 1890-1989, in: African Economic History, vol. 21, pp. 51-71.[5375]

Olivier de Sardan, Jean-Pierre (1983): The Songay-Zarma female slave, Relations of production and ideological status, in: Robertson, Claire / Klein, Martin (eds.): Women and slavery in Africa, University of Wisconsion Press, Madison, pp. 130-143.[5379]

Literature

Boyd-Buggs, Debra (2003): Confiscated flowers: Writing by and about women in Niger, in: Boyd-Buggs, Debra / Scott, Joyce H. (eds.): Camel tracks: Critical perspectives on Sahelian literatures, Africa World Press, Trenton. [5872]

Niandu, Aissatou (2003): Deconstructing the stereotype of the passive and voiceless African woman: An analysis of Zarma poetry by women, in: Boyd-Buggs, Debra / Scott, Joyce H. (eds.): Camel tracks: Critical perspectives on Sahelian literatures, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5873]

Sidikou, Aissata (2001): Recreating worlds, reshaping worlds, The verbal art of women from Niger, Mali and Senegal, Africa World Press, Trenton.[5874]

media

Rasmussen, Susan (2003): Gendered discourse and mediated modernities, Urban and rural performances of Tuareg smith women, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 487-509.[6546]

politics - wars violent conflicts

no entries to this combination of country and topic

politics

Cooper, Barbara (1995): The politics of difference and women's associations in Niger: Of "prostitutes", the public and politics, in: Signs, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 851-882. und in: Hodgson, Dorothy / McCurdy, Sheryl (eds.): „Wicked“ women and the reconfiguration of gender, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 255-273. (Heinemann, Portmouth 1997)[7312]

Villalon, Leonardo A. (1996): The moral and the political in African democratization: The code de la famille in Niger's troubled transition, in: Democratization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 41-68.[7313]

Religion - Christianity

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - Islam

Alidou, Hassana / Alidou, Ousseina (2008): Women, religion and discourse of legal ideology in Niger Republic, in: Africa Today, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 21-36.[7853]

Alidou, Ousseina (2005): Engaging modernity: Muslim women and the politics of agency in postcolonial Niger, University of Wisconsin Pres, Madison.[7854]

Beik, Janet (1987): Women’s roles in contemporary Hausa theatre of Niger, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 232-244.[7855]

Bergstrom, Kari (2002): Legacies of colonialism and Islam for Hausa women: An historical analysis, 1804 to 1960, Working Paper no. 276, Women in Development, Michigan State University, Michigan.[7856]

Bisilliat, Jeanne (1983): The feminine sphere in the institutions of the Songhay-Zarma, in: Oppong, Christine (ed.): Female and male in West Africa, London, pp. 99-106. [7857]

Cooper, Barbara (1997): Gender, movement, and history, Social and spatial transformations in 20th century Maradi, Niger, in: Environment and Planning, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 195-221.[7858]

Cooper, Barbara (1997): Marriage in Maradi: Gender and culture in a Hausa society in Niger, 1900-1989, James Currey Publications, Oxford. [7859]

Cooper, Barbara (2003): Anatomy of a riot, The social imaginary, single women, and religious violence in Niger, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 37, no. 2-3, pp. 467-512.[7860]

Cooper, Barbara (1998): Gender and religion in Hausaland, Variations in Islamic practice in Niger and Nigeria, in: Bodman, Herbert / Tohidi, Nayereh (eds.): Women in Muslim societies, Diversity within unity, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp. 21-37.[7861]

Cooper, Barbara (2001): The strength in the song, Muslim personhood, audible capital, and Hausa women’s performance of the Hajj, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Gendered modernities, Ethnographic perspectives, Palgrave Publications, New York, pp. 79-104.[7862]

Dunbar, Roberta (1991): Islamic values, the state, and `the development of women´, The case of Niger, in: Coles, Catherine / Mack, Beverly (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 69-89.[7863]

Echard, N. (1991): The Hausa possession cult in the Ader region of Niger: Ist origins and present-day function, in: Lewis, I. / Al-Safi, A. / Hurreiz, S. (eds.): Women’s medicine: The Zar-Bori cult in Africa and beyound, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, pp. 64-80.[7864]

Echard, N. (1991): Gender relations and religion: Women in the Hausa bori cult of Ader, Niger, in: Coles, C. / Mack, B. (eds.): Hausa women in the twentieth century, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.[7865]

Masquelier, Adeline (1995): Consumption, prostitution and reproduction, The poetics of sweetness in Bori, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 22, pp. 883-906.[7866]

Masquelier, Adeline (1996): Mediating threads: Clothing and the texture of spirit/medium relations in Bori (Southern Niger), in: Hendickson, Hildi (ed.): Clothing and difference, Embodied identities in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 66-94.[7867]

Masquelier, Adeline (1999): The invention of anti-tradition, Dodo spirits in Southern Niger, in: Behrend, Heike / Luig, Ute (eds.): Spirit possession, Modernity and power in Africa, James Currey, London, pp. 34-50.[7868]

Masquelier, Adeline (2008): When spirits are veiling, The case of the veiled she-devil in a Muslim Town of Niger, in: Africa Today, vol. 54, no. 3, pp.39-64.[7869]

Masquelier, Adeline (2009): Women and Islamic revival in a West African Town, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[7870]

Rasmussen, Susan (1990): Lack of prayer, Ritual restrictions, social experience and the anthropology of menstruation among the Tuareg, in: American Ethnologist, pp. 751-769.[7871]

Rasmussen, Susan (1991): Veiled self, transparent meanings, in: Ethnology, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 101-116.[7872]

Rasmussen, Susan (1993): Creativity, conflict and power in Tuareg spirit possession, in: Anthropology and Humanism, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 21-30.[7873]

Rasmussen, Susan (1994): The `head dance', contested self, and art as a balancing act in Tuareg spirit possession, in: Africa, vol. 64, no. 1, pp. 74-98.[7874]

Rasmussen, Susan (1995): Spirit possession and personhood among the Kel Ewey Tuareg, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[7875]

Rasmussen, Susan (2004): `These are dirty times': Transformations of gendered space and Islamic ritual protection in Tuareg herbalists and Marabouts' Albaraka blessing powers, in: Journal of Ritual Studies, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 43-60.[7876]

Saunders, Margaret (1990): Women’s role in a Muslim Hausa town (Mirria, Republic of Niger), in: Bourgoignon, Erica (ed.): A world of women - Anthropological studies in the societies of the world, Routledge Publishers, New York, pp. 57-86.[7877]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Alidou, Hassana (2008): Women, religion and discourse of legal ideology in Niger Republic, in: Africa Today, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 21-36.[11161]

Boyd, Lydia / Burrill, Emily (eds.) (2020): Legislating gender and sexuality in Africa, Human rights, society, and the state, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.[11162]

Soulas de Russel, Dominique (1999): Die Frauenförderung als Teilauftrag eines Rechtsberatungsprojekts – Erfahrungen im Sahel / Niger, 1995-97, in: Recht in Afrika, Heft 2, pp. 187-199.[11163]

Vicari, Marianne (2007): Auswirkungen der Handelsliberalisierung auf Frauenrechte in Niger, in: Menschenrechtsmagazin, Heft 2, pp. 194-200.[11164]

society - families marriages

Cooper, Barbara (1995): Women’s worth and wedding gift exchange in Maradi, Niger, 1907-1989, in: Journal of African History, vol. 36, no. 1, pp. 121-140.[8744]

Cooper, Barbara (1997): Marriage in Maradi: Gender and culture in a Hausa society in Niger, 1900-1989, James Currey Publications, Oxford. [8745]

Masquelier, Adeline (2005): The scorpions sting: Youth, marriage and the struggle for social maturity in Niger, in: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, vol. 11, pp. 59-83.[8746]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1987): Interpreting androgynous women, Female aging and personhood among the Kel Ewey Tuareg, in: Ethnology, vol. 26, pp. 17-29.[8747]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1994): Female sexuality, social reproduction, and the politics of medical intervention in Northern Niger, in: Culture, Medicine and Psychatry, vol. 19, pp. 1-20.[8748]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (1997): Politics and poetics of Tuareg aging, Life course and personal dignity in Niger, Northern Illinois Press, De Kelb.[8749]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): From childbearers to culture-bearers: Transition to postchildbearing among Tuareg women, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 91-116.[8750]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2000): Exhaulted mothers, Gender, aging and post childbearing experience in a Tuareg community, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 186-206.[8751]

Rasmussen, Susan J. (2001): Wedding of calm and wedding of noise, Aging performed and aging misquoted in Tuareg rites of passage, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 277-304.[8752]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - masculinities

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - migration and urbanisation

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - women's organisations

no entries to this combination of country and topic

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