Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Mozambique

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Arndt, Channing / Benfica, Rui / Thurlow, James (2011): Gender implications of biofuels expansion in Africa, The case of Mozambique, in: World Development, vol. 39, no. 9, pp.1649-1662.[717]

Arndt, Channing / Tarp, Finn (2000): Agricultural technology, risk and gender: A CGE analysis of Mozambique, in: World Development, vol. 28, no. 7, pp.1307-326.[716]

Ayisi, Ruth Ansah (1995): Supporting women farmers in the Green Zones of Mozambique, in: Leonard, Ann (ed.): Seeds 2: Supporting women’s work around the world, The Feminist Press, New York, pp.41-63.[718]

Bonate, Liazzat (2003): Women’s land rights in Mozambique, Cultural, legal and social contexts, in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land rights in Africa, Culture, religion and realizing women’s rights, Zed Books, London, pp.96-132.[719]

Crush, Jonathan (ed. (2011): Migration-induced HIV and AIDS in rural Mozambique and Swaziland, IDASA Publication, Cape Town.[720]

Davison, Jean (1987): Gender relations of production in collective farming in Mozambique, A case study from Sofala Province, Working Paper, no. 153, Women in International Development, Michigan State University, East Lansing.[721]

Davison, Jean (1988): Land redistribution in Mozambique and its effects on women’s collective production: Case studies from Sofala Province, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, women and land – The African experience, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 228-249.[722]

Gawaya, Rose (2008): Investing in women farmers to eliminate food insecurity in Southern Africa, Policy related research from Mozambique, in: Gender and Development, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 147-159.[723]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2019): From Cradle to Chain? Gendered meanings of cassava commercialization in Mozambique, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 224-242.[11856]

Gengenbach, Heidi (1998): ‘I’ll bury you in the border!’: Women’s land struggles in post-war Facazisse (Magude District), Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 1, pp.7-36.[724]

Gotschi, Elisabeth / Njuki, Jemimah / Delve, Robert (2009): Equal numbers, equal chances? A case study of gender differences in the distribution of social capital in smallholder farmer groups in Búzi District, Mozambique, in: European Journal of Development Research, vol. 21, pp.264-282.[725]

Heinrich Böll Stiftung (2010): Gender and Climate Change, Mozambique Case Study, Cape Town, Berlin.[726]

Jochems, Hiltrud / Hippler, Michael (1990): Frauen als Trägerinnen der Entwicklung. Genossenschaftliche Frauenförderung in Mosambik, in: Bornhorst, Bernd (Hg.): Entwicklungszusammenarbeit auf dem Land: Beispiele aus drei Kontinenten, Brimberg Druck, Aachen, pp.139-170.[727]

Kanji, Nazneen / Vijfhuizen, Carin (2004): Cracking cashew nut myths? The challenges of gendered policy research in the cashew sector in Mozambique, in: IDS Bulletin, vol. 35, no. 4, pp.51-59.[728]

Kruks, Sonia /Wisner, Ben (1984): The state, the party and female peasantry in Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 11, no. 1, pp.106-127.[729]

Oya, Carlos / Sender, John (2009): Divorced, separated, and widowed women workers in rural Mozambique, in: Feminist Economics, vol. 15, no. 2, pp.1-31.[730]

Penvenne, Jeanne Marie (2015): Women, Migration, and the Cashew Economy in Southern Mozambique 1945–1975, James Currey, Oxford.[11862]

Pitcher, Anne M. (1996): Conflict and cooperation: Gendered roles and responsibilities within cotton households in Northern Mozambique, in: African Studies Review, vol. 39, no. 3, pp.81-112.[731]

Rodet, Marie (2007): Gender und Landrechte, Mosambik, Genderbox, Internet-Recherche/Deskstudie zu Gender und Landrechten, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, Wien.[732]

Sender, John / Oya, Carlos / Cramer, Christopher (2006): Women working for wages, Putting flesh on the bones of a rural labour market survey in Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 32, no. 2, pp.313-334.[733]

Sheldon, Kathleen (2002): Pounders of grain, A history of women, work and politics in Mozambique, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth.[734]

UN Habitat (2006): Mozambique, Land tenure and gender review, UN Habitat, Nairobi.[735]

Vijfhuizen, Carin / Braga, Carla (2003): Gender, markets and livelihoods in the context of globalization, A study of the cashew sector in Mozambique, International Institute for Environment and Development, IIED, London.[736]

Waterhouse, Rachel (2001): Women’s land rights in post-war Mozambique, in: Buregeya, Alfred / Garling, Marguerite et al. (eds.): Women’s land and property rights in situations of conflict and reconstruction, UNIFEM Publications, New York, pp.45-53. [737]

Waterhouse, Rachel / Vijfhuizen, Carin (eds. (2001): Strategic women - gainful men, Gender, land and natural resources in different rural contexts in Mozambique, UEM, Maputo.[738]

Young, Sherilyn (1977): Fertility and famine: Women’s agricultural history in Southern Mozambique, in: Palmer, Robin / Parsons, Neil (eds.): The roots of rural poverty in Central and Southern Africa, Heinemann Publishers, London, pp.66-81.[739]

arts and culture

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - formal and informal employment

Rutherford, Blair / Chemane-Chilemba, Laila (2020): The governance of artisanal and small-scale mining in Manica District, Mozambique, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 139-156. [11647]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1991): Sewing clothes and sorting cashew nuts: Factories, families and women in Beira, Mozambique, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 14, no. 1/2, pp. 27-36.[1705]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1991): A report on a ‘delicate problem’ concerning female garment workers in Beira, Mozambique, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 575-586.[1706]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1992): Chreches, titias, and mothers: Working women and child care in Mozambique, in: Hansen, Karen Tranberg (ed.): African encounters with domesticity, New Brunswick, pp. 290-310.[1707]

economy - Households

Pfeiffer, James (2003): Cash income, intrahousehold cooperative conflict, and child health in central Mozambique, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 87-130.[1972]

economy - markets and traders

Ahrends, Elke (2008): Lokale Märkte in Mosambik, Handel, Gender und Sozialbeziehungen, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[2172]

economy - pastoralism

no entries to this combination of country and topic

education schooling and tertiary education

Machel, Josina (2001): Unsafe sexual behaviour among schoolgirls in Mozambique, A matter of gender and class, in: Reproductive Health Matters, vol. 17, pp. 82-90.[2728]

Manuel, S. (2005): Obstacles to condome use among secondary school students in Maputo City, Mozambique, in: Health and Society, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 293-302.[2729]

Muianga, Lucena (1997): Gender, norms, and cultural values and the right to education, The example of three schools in Manhica District of Mozambique, in: Ncube, Welshman (ed.): Law, culture, tradition and children’s rights in Eastern and Southern Africa, Ashgate Publishers, Dartmouth, pp. 266-288.[2730]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1998): ‘I studied with the nuns, learning to make blouses’, Gender ideology and colonial education in Mozambique, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 595-625.[2731]

Silva, Teresa C.E. (2001): Reading consciousness from social biographies: Short life stories of men and women educated by the Swiss missionaries, in: Silva, Teresa C.E.: Protestant churches and the formation of political consciouness in Southern Mozambique (1930-1974). Schlettwein Publishers, Basel.[2732]

health - fgc fgm

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Agha, Soheil et al. (2001): The promotion of condome use in non-regular sexual partnerships in urban Mozambique, in: Health Policy and Planning, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 144-152.[3642]

Cossa, H.A. / Gloyd, S. et al. (1994): Syphilis and HIV infection among displaces pregnant women in rural Mozambique, in: International Journal of STD and AIDS, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 117-123.[3643]

Crush, Jonathan (ed.) (2011): Migration-induced HIV and AIDS in rural Mozambique and Swaziland, IDASA Publication, Cape Town.[3644]

De Walque, Damien (2011): Food crisis, household welfare and HIV/AIDS treatment, Evidence from Mozambique, Policy Research Working Paper, World Bank, Washington D.C.[3645]

Junior, Boia Efraime (2004): Armed conflict and sexual abuse of children in Mozambique, in: Richter, Linda / Dawes, Andrew / Higson-Smith, Craig (eds.): Sexual abuse of young children in Southern Africa, Publications of the Human Science Research Council, Pretoria, pp. 411-426.[3646]

health - reproduction and fertility

Agadjanian, Victor (1998): Economic security, Informational resources, and women's reproductive choices in urban Mozambique, in: Social Biology, vol. 45, pp. 60-79.[4665]

Agadjanian, Victor (1998): Women's choice between indigenous and western contraception in urban Mozambique, in: Women and Health, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 1-17.[4666]

Agadjanian, Victor (1998): Trapped on the margins, Social characteristics, economic conditions and reproductive behaviour of internally displaced women in urban Mozambique, in: Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 284-303.[4667]

Agadjanian, Victor (2001): Negotiating through reproductive change, Gendered social interaction and fertility regulation in Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 291-310.[4668]

Agadjanian, Victor (2002): Men's talk about ‘women matters’: Gender, communication, and contraception in urban Mozambique, in: Gender and Society, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 194-215.[4669]

Chapman, Rachel (2004): A nova vida, The commoditization of reproduction in central Mozambique, in: Medical Anthropology, vol. 23, pp. 229-261.[4670]

Chapman, Rachel (2010): Family secrets, Risking reproduction in central Mozambique, Vanderbilt University Press, Nashville.[4671]

Connor, Teresa (2020): Reformulating identity in post war Mozambique, Sexuality and initiation of women in the Pafuri Triangle, in: New Contree, vol. 84, pp. 57-73. [11668]

Gerrits, Trudie (1997): Social and cultural aspects of infertility in Mozambique, in: Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 31, pp. 39-48.[4672]

Gerrits, Trudie (2002): Infertility and matrilineality: The exceptional case of the Macua of Mozambique, in: Inhorn, Marcia C. / Van Balen, Frank (eds.): Infertility around the globe: New thinking on childlessness, gender, and reproductive technologies, University of California Press, Berkeley.[4673]

Machungo, Fernando et al. (1997): Reproductive characteristics and post-abortion health consequences in women undergoing illegal and legal abortion in Maputo, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 45, pp. 1607-1613.[4674]

Manuel, S. (2005): Obstacles to condome use among secondary school students in Maputo City, Mozambique, in: Health and Society, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 293-302.[4675]

Potts, Deborah (2001): Fertility in Southern Africa, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 189-302.[4676]

health

no entries to this combination of country and topic

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Gengenbach, Heidi (2017): Provisions´ and Power on an Imperial Frontier, A Gendered History of Hunger in 16th c. Central Mozambique, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 50, no. 3, pp.409-437.[11857]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2000): Naming the Past in a `Scattered´ Land, Memory and the Powers of Women´s Naming Practices in Southern Mozambique, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 33, no. 3 pp. 523-542.[11858]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2002): `What My Heart Wanted´, Gendered Stories of Early Colonial Encounters in Southern Mozambique,” in: Geiger, Susan / Allman, Jean / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women and African Colonial History, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 19-47.[11859]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2005): Binding Memories, Women as Tellers and Makers of History in Magude, Mozambique, Columbia University Press, New York.[11861]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2002): “What my heart wanted”, Gendered stories of early colonial encounters in Southern Mozambique, in: Allman, Jean / Geiger, Susan / Musisi, Nakanyike (eds.): Women in colonial African histories, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 19-47.[5361]

Gengenbach, Heidi (2003): Boundaries of beauty: Tattooed secrets of women's history in Magude District, Southern Mozambique, in: Journal of Women's History, vol. 14, pp. 105-140.[5362]

Penvenne, Jeanne Marie (2015): Women, Migration, and the Cashew Economy in Southern Mozambique 1945–1975, James Currey, Oxford.[11863]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1994): Women and revolution in Mozambique, A luta continua, in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and the revolution in Africa, Asia and the New World, University of California Press, Columbia, pp. 33-59.[5363]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1998): ‘I studied with the nuns, learning to make blouses’, Gender ideology and colonial education in Mozambique, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 595-625.[5364]

Sheldon, Kathleen (2002): Pounders of grain, A history of women, work and politics in Mozambique, Heinemann Publishers, Portsmouth.[5365]

Sheldon, Kathleen (2003): Markets and gardens, Placing women in the history of urban Mozambique, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 37, no. 2-3, pp. 358-395.[5366]

Soares, da Costa Rosário Carmeliza (2015): Another time, another place, Memory of female power and authority from the Zambezi Valley, Mozambique, in: African Economic History, vol. 43, pp. 196-215.[5367]

Urdang, Stephanie (1982): Pre-conditions for victory, Women’s liberation in Mozambique and Guinea-Bisseau, in: Issue, A Journal of Opinion, vol. 8, no. 1, pp. 25-31.[5368]

Urdang, Stephanie (1989): And still they dance, Women, war and the struggle for change in Mozambique, London.[5369]

Literature

Chizane, Paulina (2003): Das siebte Gelöbnis, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[5870]

Chiziane, Paulina (1997): Wind der Apokalypse, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[5868]

Chiziane, Paulina (2001): Liebeslied an den Wind, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[5869]

Owen, Hilary (2007): Mother Africa, father Marx, Women’s writing of Mozambique, 1948-2002, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg.[5871]

media

no entries to this combination of country and topic

politics - wars violent conflicts

Ager, A. / Ager, W. / Long, L. (1995): The differential experience of Mozambican refugee women and men, in: Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 265-287.[6775]

Arnfeld, Signe (1988): Women in Mozambique: Gender struggle and gender politics, in: Review of African Political Economy, 41, pp. 5-16.[6776]

Baden, Sally (1998): Post-conflict Mozambique, Women’s special situation, Population issues and gender perspectives, IDS Report, no. 44, Brighton.[6777]

Cliffe, Julie (1991): The war on women in Mozambique: Health consequences of South African destabilization, economic crisis, and structural adjustment, in: Meredeth, Trushen (ed.): Women and health in Africa, Trenton, pp. 15-34.[6778]

Cliffe, Julie (1992): Destabilisation, Economic adjustment and the impact on women, in: Agenda, vol. 14, pp. 25-38.[6779]

Connor, Teresa (2020): Reformulating identity in post war Mozambique, Sexuality and initiation of women in the Pafuri Triangle, in: New Contree, vol. 84, pp. 57-73. [11669]

De Abreu, Alcinda Antonio (1998): Mozambican women experiencing violence, in: Trushen, Meredeth / Twagiramariya, Clotilde (eds.) What women do in wartime: Gender and conflict in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 73-84.[6780]

Dzimbiri, L.B. (1995): Challenging gender stereotypes in training: Mozambican refugees in Malawi, in: Development in Practice, 5, 2, pp. 154-157.[6781]

Feijo, Joao (2021): The role of women in the conflict in Cabo Delgado, Understanding vicious cycles of violence, FES, Dakar/Maputo.[11918]

Gengenbach, Heidi (1997): ‘I’ll bury you in the border!: Women’s land struggle in post- war facazisse (Magude District), Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 7-36.[6782]

Igreja, Victor (2008): Gamba spirits, Gender relations, and healing in post-civil war Gorongosa, Mozambique, in: Journal of Royal Anthropological Institute, n.s. 14, pp. 350-367. [6783]

Igreja, Victor (2009): Christian religious transformation and gender relations in postwar Mozambique, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 39, pp. 262-294.[6784]

Igreja, Victor / Lambranca, Béatrice (2009): The Thursdays as they live, Christian religious transformation and gender relations in postwar Gorongosa, Central Mozambique, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 262-294.[6785]

Jacobson, Ruth (1999): Complicating complexity, Integrating gender into the analysis of the Mozambiquan conflict, in: Third World Quarterly, vol. 20, 1, pp. 175-187.[6786]

Jacobson, Ruth (2005): Gender, war, and peace in Mozambique and Angola: Advances and absences, in: Mazurana, Dyan E. / Raven-Roberts, Angela / Parpart, Jane L. (eds.): Gender, Conflict and Peacekeeping, Rowman and Littlefield Lanham.[6787]

Jose, Marie Arthur (1998): Mozambique, Women in armed struggle, in: MacFadden, Patricia (ed.): Southern Africa in Transtition, A gendered perspective, SAPES Publications, Harare, pp. 67-82.[6788]

Junior, Boia Efraime (2004): Armed conflict and sexual abuse of children in Mozambique, in: Richter, Linda / Dawes, Andrew / Higson-Smith, Craig (eds.): Sexual abuse of young children in Southern Africa, Publications of the Human Science Research Council, Pretoria, pp. 411-426.[6789]

Katto, Jonna (2020): Women’s lived landscapes of war and liberation in Mozambique, Bodily memory and the gendered aesthetics of belonging, Routledge, London.[11581]

Katto, Jonna (2014): Landscapes of belonging, Female ex-combatants remembering the liberation struggle in urban Maputo, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 40, no. 3, pp. 539-557.[6790]

Machel, Graca Simbine (1988): The terror and the resistance, in: African Women, Autumn, pp. 6-9.[6791]

Madzokere, C. (1993): Gender and work, Past, present and future, The situation of rural Mozambican women at Mazowe River Bridge Camp in Zimbabwe, in: Journal of Social Development in Africa, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 23-32.[6792]

Nordstrom, Carolyn (1997): Girls and warzones, Troubling questions, Publications of theLife and Peace Institute, Uppsala.[6793]

Nordstrom, Carolyn (1998): Girls behind the (front) lines, in: Lorentzen, Lois Ann / Turpin, Jennifer (eds.): The women and war reader, New York University Press, New York, pp. 80-89.[6794]

Nordstrom, Carolyn (1999): Visible wars and invisible girls, Shadow industries, and the politics of not-knowing, in: International Feminist Journal of Politics, vol. 1, pp. 14-33.[6795]

Rodriguez, Anabella (1983): Mozambican women after the revolution, in: Davies, Miranda (ed.) Third World - second sex. Women's struggles and national liberation, Zed Books, London, pp. 127-134.[6796]

Schäfer, Rita (2008): Frauen und Kriege in Afrika, ein Beitrag zur Gender-Forschung, Brandes und Apsel Verlag, Frankfurt a.M.[11882]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1994): Women and revolution in Mozambique, A luta continua, in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and the revolution in Africa, Asia and the New World, University of California Press, Columbia, pp. 33-59.[6797]

Tranberg Hansen, Karen / Ashbaugh, Leslie (1991): Women on the front line: development issues in Southern Africa, in: GALLIN, Rita S. / FERGUSON, Anne (eds.): The women and international development annual, vol. 2, Boulder Westview Press, pp. 205-240.[6798]

Urdang, Stephanie (1988): And still they dance, Women, war and the struggle for change in Mozambique, London.[6799]

West, Harry (1997): Power, hope, and suspicion in post-war Mozambique, in: Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, 3, pp. 675-698.[6800]

West, Harry (2000): Girls with guns, Narrating the experience of war of Frelimo’s female detachment, in: Anthropology Quarterly, vol 73, no. 4, pp. 180-194.[6801]

Wilson, Zoe (2005): State making, Peacemaking, and the inscription of gendered politics into peace: Lessons from Angola, in: Mazurana, Dyan E. / Raven-Roberts, Angela / Parpart, Jane L. (eds.): Gender, conflict and peacekeeping, Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham.[6802]

politics

Bauer, Gretchen (2006): Loosing ground without mandatory quotas, in: Bauer, Gretchen / Britton, Hannah (eds.): Women in African parliament, Lynne Rienner, Boulder.[7303]

Becker, Heike (1992): Zwischen Parteipolitik und Autonomie, Erfahrungen der namibischen Frauenbewegung, in: Peripherie, Nr. 47/48, pp. 49-73.[7304]

Becker, Heike (1995): Namibian women’s movement 1980-1992, Form anti-colonial resistance to reconciliation, IKO-Verlag, Frankfurt.[7305]

Becker, Heike (2001): „We want women to be given an equal chance“, Post independence rural politics in Northern Namibia, in: Meredeth, Sheila / Pillay, Anu / Turshen, Meredeth (eds.): The aftermath, Women in post-conflict transformation, Zed Books, London, pp. 225-242.[7306]

Disney, J.L. (2006): Mozambique, empowering women through family law, in: Bauer, Gretchen / Britton, Hannah (eds.): Women in African parliament, Lynne Rienner, Boulder.[7297]

Frank, Liz / Khaxas, Elizabeth (2004): A case study of the 50/50 campaign in Namibia, Focusing on women’s grass-roots participation, in: Valk, Minke (ed.): Gender, citizenship and subject, Kit-Publishers, Amsterdam, pp. 61-73.[7307]

Jacobson, Ruth (1995): Women’s political participation, Mozambique’s democratic transition, in: Gender and Development, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 29-36.[7298]

Karberg, Sindy (2015): Female political empowerment, FES, Maputo/Berlin. [11579]

Kruks, Sonya / Wisner, Ben (1984): The state, the party and female peasantry in Mozambique, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 11, pp. 106-127.[7299]

Kruks, Sonya / Wisner, Ben (1989): Ambigious transformations: Women, politics and production in Mozambique, in: Kruks, Sonya / Rapp, Rayna Youns, Marilyn (eds.): Promissory notes: Women in the transition to socialism, New York, Monthly Review Press.[7300]

Lideke, William / Wanzala, Winnie (1994): Regional elections in Namibia, Deeping democracy and gender inclusion, in: Africa Today, 3, pp. 5-14.[7308]

Lorch, Jasmin / Bunk, Bettina (2016): Gender politics, authoritarian regime resilience, and the role of civil society in Algeria and Mozambique GIGA - German Institute of Global and Area Studies, Working Paper No. 292, Hamburg.[11580]

Morna, Coleen Lowe / Tolmay, Susan (2007): At the coalface, Gender and local government in Southern Africa, Gender Links, Johannesburg.[7309]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1994): Women and revolution in Mozambique, a luta continua, in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and revolution in Africa, Asia and the new world, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 33-61.[7301]

Wanzala, Winnie (1994): Regional elections in Namibia, Deepening democracy and gender inclusion, in: Africa Today, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 5-14.[7310]

Wanzala, Winnie (1995): Women and elections in Namibia after five years of independence, in: Southern African Feminist Review, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 49-59.[7311]

Religion - Christianity

Agadjanian, Victor (2005): Gender, religious involvement, and HIV/AIDS prevention in Mozambique, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 61, pp. 1529-1539.[7671]

Gaitskell, Deborah (1998): Religion embracing science? Female missionary ventures in Southern African Anthropology, Dora Earthy and Mozambique, 1917-1933, BAB Working Papers, no .5, Basler Afrika Bibliographien, Basel.[7672]

Igreja, Victor / Lambranca, Béatrice (2009): The Thursdays as they live, Christian religious transformation and gender relations in postwar Gorongosa, Central Mozambique, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 262-294.[7673]

Macamo, Elísio (2003): Frauen als moralischer Körper der Gesellschaft, Schweizer Mission in Mosambik und die Erfingung der Tsonga, in: Lienemann, C. / Strahm, D. / Walz, H. (Hrsg.): Als hätten sie uns neu erfunden, Beobachtungen zu Fremdheit und Geschlecht, Edition Exodus, Luzern, pp. 153-164.[7674]

Pfeiffer, James / Gimbel-Sherr, Kenneth / Augusto, Orvalho Joaquim (2008): The holy spirit and the household, Pentecosalism, gender, and neoliberalism in Mozambique, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 109, no. 4, pp. 688-700.[7675]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1998): ‘I studied with the nuns, learning to make blouses’, Gender ideology and colonial education in Mozambique, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 595-625.[7676]

Silva, Teresa C.E. (2001): Reading consciousness from social biographies: Short life stories of men and women educated by the Swiss missionaries, in: Silva, Teresa C.E.: Protestant churches and the formation of political consciouness in Southern Mozambique (1930-1974). Schlettwein Publishers, Basel.[7677]

Religion - Islam

Bonate, Liazaat (2006): Matriliny, Islam and gender in Northern Mozambique, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 139-166.[7852]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Agadjanian, Victor (2005): Gender, religious involvement, and HIV/AIDS prevention in Mozambique, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 61, pp. 1529-1539.[10256]

Macamo, Elísio (2003): Frauen als moralischer Körper der Gesellschaft, Schweizer Mission in Mosambik und die Erfingung der Tsonga, in: Lienemann, C. / Strahm, D. / Walz, H. (eds.): Als hätten sie uns neu erfunden, Beobachtungen zu Fremdheit und Geschlecht, Edition Exodus, Luzern, pp. 153-164.[10257]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Osório, Conceicao / Andrade, Ximena et al. (2001): Power and violence, Femicide and homicide in Mozambique. WLSA Publications, Maputo.[10486]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Berg, Nina / Gundersen, Aase (1991): Legal reform in Mozambique - Equality and emancipation for women through popular justice?, in: Stolen, Kristi Ann / Vaa, Mariken (eds.): Gender and change in developing countries, Norwegean University Press, Oslo, pp. 223-246.[11124]

Bonate, Liazaat (2003): Women’s land rights in Mozambique - Cultural, legal and social contexts, in: Wanyeki, Muthoni (ed.): Women and land in Africa: Culture, religion and realizing women's rights, Zed Books, London, pp. 96-132.[11125]

Bonate, Liazaat (2005): Muslim women and the discourse of Islamic law in Northern Mozambique, unpublished paper presented at the international conference “Writing African Women”, 19-22.1.2005, University of the Western Cape, Bellville.[11126]

Francisco, Maria Noemia (1988): Women in the context of legal reform in Mozambique, Working Papers in Women’s Law, Working Paper no. 14, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11127]

Pelzer, Kathrin (2007): Frauenrechte, Länderprofil, Mosambik, Genderbox, Internet-Recherche/Deskstudie zu Gender und Landrechten, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, Wien.[11128]

Pinto, Ana Maria Pessoa (1995): Sexual division of labour and developments in the law of Mozambique, in: Ludwar-Ene, Gudrun / Reh, Mechthild (eds.): Gender and identity in Africa, Beiträge zur Afrikaforschung 8, Münster - Hamburg, pp. 187-196.[11129]

Rodet, Marie (2007): Gender und Landrechte, Mosambik, Genderbox, Internet-Recherche/Deskstudie zu Gender und Landrechten, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, Wien.[11130]

UN Habitat (2006): Mozambique, Land tenure and gender review, Southern Africa, UN Habitat, Nairobi.[11131]

Welch, Gita H. et al. (1987): Transforming family law: New directions in Mozambique, in: Armstrong, Alice K. (ed.): Women and law in Southern Africa, Zimbabwe Publishing House, Harare, pp. 105-124.[11132]

Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (WLSA) (1997): Families in a changing environment in Mozambique. Written by Ximena Andrade & Ana Maria Loforte et al.: WLSA Publications, Maputo.[11133]

Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (WLSA) (2001): Power and violence. Femicide and homicide in Mozambique. Written by Conceicao Osório & Ximena Andrade et al.: WLSA Publications, Maputo.[11134]

Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (WLSA) (2001): A critical analysis of women’s access to land in the WLSA countries, Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, WLSA Publication, Harare.[11135]

Women and Law in Southern Africa Research Trust (WLSA) (2002): Lobola, Its implications for women’s reproductive rights in Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe, Weaver Press, Harare.[11136]

society - families marriages

Arnaldo, Carlos (2004): Ethnicity and marriage patterns in Mozambique, in: African Population Studies, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 143-164.[8733]

Bentzon, Agnete (1994): European family law confronting the extended family in developing countries: The cases of Greenland and Mozambique, in: Law and Anthropology, vol. 7, pp. 311-329.[8734]

Oya, Carlos / Sender, John (2009): Divorced, separated, and widowed women workers in rural Mozambique, in: Feminist Economics, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 1-31.[8735]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1991): Sewing clothes and sorting cashew nuts: Factories, families and women in Beira, Mozambique, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 14, no. 1/2, pp. 27-36.[8736]

Sheldon, Kathleen (1992): Chreches, titias, and mothers: Working women and child care in Mozambique, in: Hansen, Karen Tranberg (ed.): African encounters with domesticity, New Brunswick, pp. 290-310.[8737]

Welch, Gita H. et al. (1987): Transforming family law: New directions in Mozambique, in: Armstrong, Alice K. (ed.): Women and law in Southern Africa, Zimbabwe Publishing House, Harare, pp. 105-124.[8738]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Human Rights Council - United Nations (2019): Visit to Mozambique, Report of the Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, A/HRC/41/45/Add.2, Geneva. [11958]

society - masculinities

Agadjanian, Victor (2002): Men's talk about `women matters': Gender, communication, and contraception in urban Mozambique, in: Gender and Society, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 194-215.[9281]

Agadjanian, Victor (2002): Men doing `women's work': Masculinity and gender relations among street vendors in Maputo, Mozambique, in: Journal of Men, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 329-342.[9282]

Groes-Green, Christian (2009): Hegemonic and subordinated masculinities, Class, violence and sexual performance among young Mozambican men, in: Nordic Journal of African Studies, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 286-304.[9283]

society - migration and urbanisation

Dodson, Belinda (2000): Women on the move, Gender and cross-border migration to South Africa from Lesotho, Mozambique and Zimbabwe, in: Mcdonald, David (ed.): On borders, Perspectives on international migration in Southern Africa, St. Martin`s Press, New York, pp. 119-150.[9715]

Sheldon, Kathleen (2003): Markets and gardens, Placing women in the history of urban Mozambique, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 37, no. 2-3, pp. 358-395.[9716]

society - women's organisations

Wischermann, Jörg / Bunk, Bettina et al. (2018): Do associations support authoritarian rule? Evidence from Algeria, Mozambique, and Vietnam, in: Journal of Civil Society, vol. 14, pp. 95-115[11582]

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