Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Kenya

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

Abbott, Susan (1975): Women's importance for Kenyan rural development, in: Community Development Journal, vol. 10, no. 3, pp.179-182.[442]

About, Abdillahi / Sofranko, Andrew / Ndiaye, Serigne (1996): Effects of gender on adaptation of conservation practices by heads of farm households in Kenya, in: Society and Natural Resources, 9, pp.447-463.[443]

Adagala, Kavetsa (1991): Households and historical change on plantations in Kenya, in: Masini, Elenora / Stratigos, Susan (ed.): Women, households and change, United Nations University Press, Tokyo, pp.205-241.[444]

Adams, William / Watson, Elizabeth / Mutiso, Samuel (1997): Water rules and gender: Water rights in an indigenous irrigation system, Marakwet, Kenya, in: Development and Change, vol. 28, pp.707-730.[445]

Aliber, Michael / Walker, Cherryl et al. (2004): Impact of HIV/AIDS on land rights, Case studies from Kenya, Human Science Research Council, Pretoria. and published in: World Development, vol. 34, no. 4, 2006, pp.704-727.[446]

Asamba, Isabella / Thomas-Slayter (1995): From cattle to coffee: Transformation in Mbusyani and Kyevaluki, in: Thomas-Slayter / Rocheleau, Dianne (eds.): Gender, environment and development in Kenya, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp.105-131.[447]

Backes, Martina (1999): Ausverkauf der biologischen Vielfalt, DED-Brief, Nr. 4, pp.33-36.[448]

Baksh, Michael / Neumann, Charlotte et al. (1994): The influence of reproductive status on rural Kenyan women's time use, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 39, pp.345-354.[450]

Baksh, Michael / Thomas, J. (1989): Women’s agricultural work, child care and infant diarrhea in rural Kenya, in: Conley, Michael / Paolisso, Michael / Lesley, Joanne (eds.): Women, work and child welfare in the third world, boulder, Westview Press, pp.217-236.[449]

Barnes, Carolyn (1976): Women in Kenya’s rural economy, in: Pala, Achola / Awori, Thelma / Krystall, Abigail (eds.): The participation of women in Kenya society, Kenya Literature Bureau, Nairobi, pp.58-72.[451]

Barnes, Carolyn (1983): Differentiation by sex among small-scale farming households in Kenya, in: Rural Africana, no. 15/16, pp.41-61. [452]

Buswell, Clare (2003): Gender, power and protest in African farming, 1930-1950, in: Australasian Review of African Studies, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 23-35.[458]

Bülow, Dorothee von (1991): Reconsidering female subordination: Kipsigis women in Kenya, Centre for Development Research, Working Paper, 91.2, Copenhagen.[453]

Bülow, Dorothee von (1991): Transgressing gender boundaries: Kipsigis women in Kenya, Centre for Development Research, Working Paper 91.3, Copenhagen. [454]

Bülow, Dorothee von (1992): Bigger than men? Gender relations and their changing meaning in Kipsigis society, Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 62, no. 4, pp.523-545.[455]

Bülow, Dorothee von / Sorensen, Ann (1988): Gender dynamics in contract farming: Women’s role in smallholder tea production in Kericho district, Kenya, Centre for Development Research, Working Paper, 88.1, Copenhagen.[456]

Bülow, Dorothee von / Sorensen, Ann (1993): Gender and contract farming: Tea outgrower schemes in Kenya, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 56, pp.38-52.[457]

Clark, C.M. (1980): Land and food, Women and power in nineteenth century Kikuyu, in: Africa, vol. 50, no. 4, pp.357-370.[459]

Dankelman, Irene / Davidson, Joan (1988): Water for health in Kenya, in: Dankelman, Irene / Davidson, Joan (eds.): Women and the environment, Earthscan Publications, London, pp.37-39.[460]

Davison, Jean (1985): Achievements and constraints among rural Kenyan women, A case study, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 15, pp.268-279.[461]

Davison, Jean (1987): Without land we are nothing: The effects of land tenure politics and practices upon rural women in Kenya, in: Rural Africana, vol. 27, no. 1, pp.19-33.[462]

Davison, Jean (1988): Who owns what? Land registration and tensions in gender relations of production in Kenya, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, women and land, The African experience, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.157-174.[463]

Davison, Jean (1989): Voices from Mutira, Lives of rural Gikuyu women, Westview Press, Boulder. [464]

Dodoo, Nii-Amoo F. / Tempenis, Maria (2002): Gender, power, and reproduction, Rural-urban differences in the relationship between fertility goals and contraceptive use in Kenya, in: Rural Sociology, vol. 67, no. 1, pp.46-70.[465]

Dolan, Catherine (2001): ‘The good wife’: Struggles over resources in the Kenyan horticulture sector, in: Journal of Development Studies, vol. 37, no. 3, pp.39-70.[466]

Dolan, Catherine (2002): Gender and witchcraft in agrarian transition, The case of Kenyan horticulture, in: Development and Change, vol. 33, no. 4, pp.659-681.[467]

Drimie, Scott (2003): HIV/AIDS and land, Case studise from Kenya, Lesotho and South Africa, in: Development Southern Africa, vol. 20, no. 5, pp.647-658.[468]

Feldman, Rayah (1984): Women's groups and women's subordination: An analysis of policies towards rural women in Kenya, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 27, pp.67-85. [469]

Feldstein, Hilary Sims / Rocheleau, Dianne / Buck, Louise (1989): Agro-forestry extension and research: A case study from Siaya district, in: Feldstein, Hilary S. / Poats, Susan V. (eds.): Working together: Gender analysis in agriculture, vol. 1: Case Studies, Kumarian Presss,West Hartford, pp.167-208.[470]

Francis, Elizabeth (1995): Migration and changing division of labour: Gender relations and economic change in Koguty, Western Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 65, no. 2.[471]

Francis, Elizabeth (1998): Gender and rural livelihoods in Kenya, in: Journal of Development Studies, vol. 35, no. 2, pp.72-95.[472]

Geissler, Wenzel P. / Prince, Ruth J. et al. (1999): Perceptions of soil-eating and anaemia among pregnant women on the Kenyan coast, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 48, pp.1069-1079.[473]

Geissler, Wenzel P. / Prince, Ruth J. et al. (2004): Die Kuh stirbt lieber mit Gras im Maul! Verhandlungen über Beischlaf und Sex im westlichen Kenia, in: Sociologus, 54. Jahrgang, Heft 2, pp.101-141.[474]

George, Jacqueline (1999): Women and natural sustainability in East Africa, in: Teherani-Krönner, Parto / Hoffmann-Altmann, Uta / Schultz, Ulrike (Hg.): Frauen und nachhaltige ländliche Entwicklung, Centaurus Verlagsgesellschaft, Pfaffenweiler, pp.143-151.[475]

Githinji, Mwangi wa et al. (2011): Small and as productive, Female headed households and the inverse relationship between land size and output, Working Paper, no. 31, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.[476]

Greene, Pamela (1986): Approaches in rural women’s programmes in three African countries, Kenya, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Implications for training field development workers, FAO Publications, Rome.[477]

Hagenimana, Vital / Oyunga, Mary Anyango (1999): The effects of women farmers‘ adoption of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes: Raising Vitamin A intake in Kenya, ICRW Research Report Series, 3, Washington DC.[478]

Hakansson, Thomas (1988): Bridewealth, Women and land, Social change among the Gusii of Kenya, Almqvist and Wiksell, Uppsala.[479]

Hanger, Jane / Moris, Jon (1973): Women and the household economy, in: Chambers, Robert / Moris, John (eds.): Mwea, An irrigated rice settlement in Kenya, Weltforum Verlag, München, pp.209-244.[480]

Hay, Margaret J. (1976): Luo women and economic change during the colonial period, in: Hafkin, Nancy J. / Bay, Edna G. (eds.): Women in Africa, Studies in Social and Economic Change, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp.87-109.[481]

Hay, Margaret J. (1982): Women as owners, occupants and managers of property, Boston University Papers, No. 7, Boston. (an published in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston University Press, Boston, 1982, pp.110-123.)[482]

Horenstein, Nadine (1989): Women and food security in Kenya, Women in Development Working Paper, WPS 232, World Bank, Washington D.C.[483]

Hulsebosch, Joitske / Ombara, Doris (1995): Towards gender balance in irrigation management, Experiences in Kenya South West Kano Project, in: Irrigation and Drainage Systems, 9, pp.1-14.[484]

Huvendick, Julia (1997): Power and gender relations in women groups on Kenya’s Rusinga Island, in: Frey, Regina (ed.): Kenya, Aspects of development, Arbeitspapiere zu Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft und Politik in Entwicklungsländern, Nr. 15, Institut für Soziologie, FU-Berlin, Berlin, pp.29-47.[485]

Hyma, B. (1993): Women’s role and participation in farm and community tree growing activities in Kiambu District, Kenya, in: Momsen, Henshall Janet / Kinnaird, Vivian (eds.): Different places, different voices, Routledge Publications, London, pp.30-45.[486]

Ifjika Sperenza, Chinwe (2011): Promoting gender equality in response to climate change, The case of Kenya, Discussion Paper, no. 5, Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik, Bonn.[487]

Irungu, C. / Zeller, M. / Mburu, J. (2005): Assessing NGDO’s targeting performance and characteristics of households participating in child development programmes in rural Kenya, in: Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics, vol. 106, no. 2, pp.119-129.[488]

Izumi, Kaori (ed. (2007): Reclaiming our lives, HIV and AIDS, Women’s land and property rights and livelihoods in Southern and East Africa, HSRC Press, Pretoria. [489]

Jensen, Ann Margitt (1991): Economic change, marriage relations and fertility in a rural area of Kenya, in: Stolen, Kriti Ann / Vaa, Marike (eds.): Gender and change in developing countries, Oslo University Press, Oslo, pp.67-89.[490]

Kaduru, Rosemary Awino (1986): Kenya: Legal services for rural women, in: Schuler, Margaret (ed.): Empowerment and the law, OED Publications, Washington D.C., pp.235-248.[491]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2005): The land has his owners! Gender issues in land tenure under customary law in Kenya, IELRC Working Paper no. 9, Nairobi.[492]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2006): Women’s land rights and the environment, The Kenyan experience, in: Development, vol. 49, no. 3, pp.43-48.[493]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2009): What does it take to realize the promises? Protecting women’s rights in the Kenya National Land Policy of 2009, in: Feminist Africa, vol. 12, pp.87-94.[494]

Kaumbutho, P.G. (2000): Bridges, The impact on travel and market activities, Nkone River Bridge, Meru, Kenya, in: Fernando, Priyanthi / Porter, Gina (eds.): Balancing the load, Women, gender and transport, Zed Books, London, pp.65-77.[495]

Kavoi, M.M. (2003): Gender analysis of economic efficiency in smallholder tea production in Kenya, in: Eastern Africa Journal of Rural Development, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 33-40.[496]

Kennedy, Eileen / Cogill, Bruce (1988): The case of sugarcane in Kenya, Effects of cash crop production on women’s income, time allocation and child care practices, Working Paper, no. 167, Women in Development International, Michigan State University, East Lansing.[498]

Kennedy, Eileen / Haddad, Lawrence (1994): Are pre-schoolers from female headed households less malnourished? A comparative analysis of results from Ghana and Kenya, in: Journal of Development Studies, vol. 30, no. 3, pp.680-695.[500]

Kennedy, Eileen / Peters, Pauline (1992): Household food security and child nutrition: The interaction of income and gender of household head, in: World Development, vol. 20, No. 8, pp.1077-1085.[499]

Kennedy, Eileen / Reardon, Thomas (1994): Shift to non-traditional grains in the diets of East and West Africa, Role of women’s opportunity cost of time, in: Food Policy, vol. 19, no. 1, pp.45-56.[501]

Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (ed. (1998): Institutionalizing gender analyses into a National Agricultural Research System: Experiences from Kenya, KARI Publications, Nairobi.[497]

Kershaw, Greet (1975): The changing roles of men and women in the Kikuyu family by socio-economic strata, in: Rural Africana, no. 21, pp.173-194. [502]

Kilavuka, Muyoma Janet (2003): A comparative study of the socio-economic implications of rural women, men, and mixed self-help groups, A case study of Kakamega District, Gender Issues Research Report Series, no. 20, Organisation for Social Science Research in Eastern and Southern Africa, Addis Ababa.[503]

Kilel, Beatrice (2005): Women in agriculture in Kenya and impact of technology, in: Chepyator-Thomson, Jeporir Rose (ed.): African women and globalization, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp.183-194.[504]

Kimenye, L.N. (1998): Assessment of technology dissemination and utilization by women and men farmers: A case study of Embu and Mbeere Districts, in: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (ed.): Institutionalizing gender considerations and analyses into a National Agricultural Research System: Experiences from Kenya, KARI Publications, Nairobi.[505]

Kneerim, Jill (1989): Village women organize, The Mraru bus service, in: Leonard, Ann (ed.): Seeds – Supporting women’s work in the third world, The Feminist Press, New York, pp.15-30.[506]

Komma, Toru (1984): Women’s informal self-help association movement among the Kipsigis of Kenya, in: Senri Ethnological Studies, 15, pp.145-186.[507]

Kunguru, Julia (1988): Innovative approaches to poverty alleviation: Provision of water to rural women in Kenya, in: Development, vol. 4, pp.83-85.[508]

Kuria, Elizabeth / Wefwafwa, Terrie / Munyasi, Florence (1997): An investigation of the services provided by extension workers to women farmers on food storage/preservation and nutrition in Bugoma District, Abridged Research Report, no. 25, Academic Science Publishers, Nairobi.[509]

Lairap-Fonderson, Josephine (2002): The discipline power of microcredit, Examples from Kenya and Cameroon, in: Parpart, Jane / Rai, Shirin / Staudt, Kathleen (eds.): Rethinking empowerment, Gender and development in a global / local world, Routledge, London, pp.102-198.[510]

Lehmwald, Alexandra (2007): Gender und Landrechte, Genderbox, Internet-Recherche/Deskstudie zu Gender und Landrechten, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, Wien.[511]

Maarse, L. / Wentholt, W. / Chibudu, A. (1998): Making change strategies work, Gender sensitive, client oriented livestock extension in Coast Province, Kenya, Royal Tropical Institute, Amsterdam.[512]

Maas, Maria (1991): Women’s social and economic projects, Experiences from Coast Province, African Studies Centre, Leiden University, Leiden.[513]

Maathai, Wangari (1985): Kenya: The Green Belt Movement, in: IFDA Dossier, 49, pp.3-12.[514]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1986): Local initiatives and national policy: Gender and agricultural change in Murang'a District, Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 22, no. 3, pp.377-401.[515]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1990): Gender and land rights in Murang’a District, Kenya, in: Journal of Peasant Studies, vol. 17, no. 4, pp.609-643.[516]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1991): Political economy of the environment, gender and resistance under colonialism: Murang’a District, Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 25, no. 2, pp.226-256.[517]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1995): A farm is like a child who cannot be left unguarded - Gender, land and labour in Central Province, Kenya, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, (IDS Bulletin), vol. 26, no. 1, pp.12-23.[518]

Mackenzie, Fiona (2003): Land tenure and biodiversity, An exploration in the political ecology of Murang’a District, Kenya, in: Human Organization, vol. 62, no. 3, pp.255-266.[519]

Mbagaya, G.M. (2007): Gender differences in agricultural extension services and training programmes in Western Kenya, in: Global Approaches to Extension Practice, vol. 3, no. 2, pp.122-130.[520]

Meyer-Mansor, Dorothee (1985): Frauenselbsthilfegruppen in Kenia, Arbeiten aus dem Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg.[521]

Monstead, Mette (1978): Women’s groups in rural Kenya and their role in development, Centre for Development Research, CDR Paper A 78.2, Copenhagen.[522]

Moock, Peter (1976): The efficiency of women as farm managers: Kenya, in: American Journal of Agricultural Economics, vol. 56, no. 5, pp.831-835.[523]

Mulaa, M.A. / Cesol, C. / Wanyama, J. / Powon, M. (1998): Gender analysis in participatory evaluation of tomato varieties and pest control options by farmer research groups in Trans Nzoia District, in: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (ed.): Institutionalizing gender considerations and analyses into a National Agricultural Research System, KARI Publications, Nairobi.[524]

Mullins, G. / Wahome, L. / Tsangari, P. / Maarse, L. (1996): Impacts of intensive dairy production on smallholder farm women in Coastal Kenya, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp.231-253.[525]

Mutiso, Roberta (1987): Poverty, women and co-operatives in Kenya, Michigan State University, Working Paper no. 135, East Lansing.[526]

Mutoro, Basilida Anyona (1997): Gender aspects in small-scale farming in Kenya, A case study of Nothern Maragoli Location in Vihiga District, in: Bruijn, Miriam de / Halsema, Ineke van / Hombergh, Heleen van (eds.): Gender and land use – Diversity in environmental practices, Thela Publishers, Amsterdam, pp.107-124.[527]

Muzaale, Patrick J. / Leonard, David K. (1985): Kenya's experience with women's groups in agricultural extension: Strategies for accelerating improvements in food production and nutritional awareness in Africa, in: Agricultural Administration, vol. 19, pp.13-28. [528]

Mwagiru, Makumi / Njeri, Karuru (1998): Women’s land and property rights in conflict situations, Centre for Conflict Research and Women and Law in East Africa, Nairobi.[529]

Mwaniki, Nyaga (1986): Against many odds: The dilemmas of women's self-help groups in Mbeere, Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 56, no. 2, pp.210-227.[530]

Nasimiya, Ruth (1997): Changing women’s rights over property in Western Kenya, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp.283-298.[531]

Neitzert, Monica (1994): A woman’s place: Household labour allocation in rural Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. 15, no. 3, pp.401-427.[532]

Nelson, Nici (1992): The women who have left and those who have stayed behind: Rural-urban migration in central and western Kenya, in: Chant, Sylvia (ed.): Gender and migration in developing countries, Routledge Publications, London, pp.109-138.[533]

Ngigi, M. W. / Mueller, U. / Birner, R. (2016): Gender differences in climate change perceptions and adaptation strategies, An intra-household analysis from rural Kenya. ZEF-Discussion Papers on Development Policy No. 210, ZEF Center for Development Research, Bonn. [11641]

Nguthi, Faith (2008): Adoption of agricultural innovations by smallholder farmers in the context of HIV/AIDS, The case of tissue-cultured banana in Kenya, Academic Press, Wageningen.[534]

Njuguna, E. / Kooijman, M. (1998): Gender considerations in farm characterisation and problem identification in the Hill Masses of Makueni District, in: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (ed.): Institutionalizing gender considerations and analyses into a National Agricultural Research System: Experiences from Kenya, KARI Publications, Nairobi.[535]

Nyamu-Musembi, Celestine (2002): Are local norms and practices fences or pathways? The example of women’s property rights, in: An-Na’im, Abdullahi (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp.126-150.[536]

Nzioki, Akinyi (2002): The effects of land tenure on women’s access and control of land in Kenya, in: An-Na’im, Abdullahi (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp.218-260.[537]

Nzioki, Akinyi (2010): Land grabbers and women’s rights in Kenya, in: Femina Politica, no. 2, pp.120-124.[538]

Obel, Elizabeth (1989): Women and afforestation in Kenya, in: Voices from Africa, vol. 1, pp.15-26.[539]

Odame, Hambly Helen (2002): Men in women’s groups, A gender and agency analyis of local institutions, in: Kimmel, Michael (ed.): Masculinities matter! Men, gender and development, Zed Books, London, pp.138-165.[540]

Odenda, Lumuba / Morara, George (1999): Land ownership, control and use, in: GAP Matters, 5, 1, pp.12-14.[541]

Ogutu, M.A. (1985): The changing role of women in the commercial history of Busia District in Kenya, 1900-1983, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 15, pp.74-90.[542]

Okeyo, Pala Achola (1980): Daughters of the lakes and rivers: Colonization and land rights of Luo women, in: Etienne, Mona / Leacock, Eleanor (eds.): Women and colonization, Praeger Publishers, New York, pp.186-213.[543]

Okoth-Ogendo, H.W.O. (1976): The changing system of land tenure and the rights of women, in: Pala, Achola / Awori, Thelma / Krystall, Abigail (eds.): The participation of women in Kenya society, Kenya Literature Bureau, Nairobi, pp.132-139.[544]

Olenja, Joyce (1991): Gender and agricultural production in Sami, Kenya: Strategies and constraints, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 21, pp.81-92. (und in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 26, no. 3-4, 1991, pp.267-275.)[545]

Ongile, Grace Atieno (1999): Gender and agricultural supply responses to structural adjustment programmes, A case study of smallholder tea-producers in Kericho District, Kenya, Research Report no. 10, The Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[547]

Ong’wen Okuro, Samwel (2008): Struggling with in-laws and corruption in Kombewa District, Kenya, in: Englert, Birgit / Daley, Elizabeth (eds.): Women’s land rights and privatization in East Africa, James Currey, Oxford, pp.121-137.[548]

Oniang’o, Ruth (1995): The impact of out-migration on household livelihood and the management of natural resources, A Kenya case study, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, (IDS Bulletin), vol. 26, no. 1, pp.54-60.[546]

Oosten, Cora van (1989): Farming systems and food security in Kwale District, Kenya, Food and Nutrition Programme, Report no. 30, African Studies Centre, Leiden.[549]

Opole, Monica (1991): Women’s indigenous knowledge base in the translation of nutritional and medical values of edible local plants in Western Kenya, in: Prah, Kwesi (ed.): Culture, gender, science and technology in Africa, Harp Publications, Windhoek, pp.81-95.[550]

Opondo, Patricia Achieng (2002): Strategies for survival by Luo female artists in the rural environment in Kenya, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americas, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp.205-226.[551]

Oyunga, M.A. / Hagenimana, V. / Kurz, K. / Low, J. (1998): Increasing Vitamin A intake through promotion of Orange Sweetpotatoes in Western Kenya: A women centered approach, in: Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (ed.): Institutionalizing gender considerations and analyses into a National Agricultural Research System, KARI Publications, Nairobi.[552]

Pala, Achola Okeyo (1980): Daughters of the lakes and rivers: Colonization and land rights of Luo women, in: Etienne, Mona / Leacock, Eleanor (eds.): Women and colonization, Routledge Publications, London, pp.186-213.[553]

Pala, Achola Okeyo (1983): Women’s access to land and their role in agriculture and decision-making on the farm: Experiences of the Joluo of Kenya, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 13, pp.69-87.[554]

Paolisso, Michael / Baksh, Michael / Thomas, Conley (1989): Women’s agricultural work, child care, and infant diarrhea in rural Kenya, in: Leslie, Joanne / Paolisso, Michael (eds.): Women, work and child welfare in the third world, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.217-236.[555]

Potash, Betty (1985): Female farmers, mothers in law and extension agents, Development planning in a rural Luo community, Michigan State University, Working Paper, 90, East Lansing.[556]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Black, white and read all over: Beans, women, and agricultural imperialism in twentieth-century Kenya, in: Agricultural History, vol. 71, no. 3, pp.259-299.[557]

Robertson, Claire (1987): Gender, resource management and rural landscape: Implications for agroforestry and farming systems research, in: Poats, pp. / Schmink, M. / Spring, A. (eds.): Gender issues in farming systems research and extension, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.149-169.[558]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Gender and biodiversity: A feminist political ecology perspective, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies, (IDS Bulletin), vol. 26, no. 1, pp.9-16.[559]

Rocheleau, Dianne / Schofield, Karen / Mbuthi, Njoki (1991): People, property, poverty and parks, A story of men, women, water and trees at Pwani, ECOGEN, Clark University, Virginia.[560]

Rutenberg, Naomi / Watkins, Susan Cotts (1997): The buzz outside the clinics, Conversations and contraception in Nyanza Province, Kenya, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 28, no. 4, pp.290-307.[561]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenzusammenschlüsse der Kikuyu, in: Schäfer, Rita: Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, Afrikanische Frauenorganisationen im zeitlichen und interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler, pp. 267-289.[562]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenzusammenschlüsse der Akamba, in: Schäfer, Rita: Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, Afrikanische Frauenorganisationen im zeitlichen und interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler, pp. 299-315.[563]

Schäfer, Rita (1996): Ressourcenmanagement und Frauenselbsthilfe: zur Frage der Akzeptanz brennholzsparender Herde durch kenianische Frauengruppen, in: Bliss, Frank / Neumann, Stefan (Hg.): Ethnologische Beiträge zur Entwicklungspolitik, 3, Beiträge zur Kulturkunde, 16, Horlemann Verlag, Bonn, pp.119-128.[564]

Silberschmidt, Margarete (1991): Rethinking men and gender relations. An investigation of men, their changing roles within the household, and the implications for gender relations in Kisii District, Kenya, Centre for Development Research, CDR Research Report 16, Copenhagen.[565]

Silberschmidt, Margarete (1999): Women forget that men are the masters, Gender antagonism and socio-economic change in Kisii District, Kenya, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[566]

Silberschmidt, Margarete (2001): Disempowerment of men in rural and urban East Africa, Implications for male identity and sexual behaviour, in: World Development, vol. 29, no. 4, pp.657-671.[567]

Sorensen, Anne (1990): The differential effects on women of cash crop production: The case of smallholder tea production in Kenya, CDR Project Paper 90.3, Copenhagen.[568]

Sorensen, Anne (1990): Women’s organization and changing gender relations among the Kipsigis of Kenya, CDR Project Paper, 90.5, Copenhagen.[569]

Sorensen, Anne (1992): Women’s organizations among the Kipsigis: Change, variety and different participation, in: Africa, vol. 62, no. 4, pp.547-563.[570]

Sorensen, Anne / Bülow, Dorothee von (1990): Gender and contract farming in Kericho, Kenya, Centre for Development Research Project, Working Papers, 90.4., Kopenhagen.[571]

Spring, Anita (2000): Agricultural commericalization and women farmers in Kenya, in: Spring, Anita (ed.): Small scale farmers and commercial ventures, Increasing food security in developing countries, Lynne Rienner Publishers, Boulder, pp.317-341.[572]

Stamp, Patricia (1975): Perceptions of change and economic strategy among Kikuyu women of Mitero, Kenya, in: Rural Africana, no. 29, pp.19-43.[573]

Stamp, Patricia (1986): Kikuyu women’s self-help groups, Toward an understanding of the relations between the sex-gender system and the mode of production in Africa, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Women and class in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.27-46.[574]

Staudt, Kathleen (1978): Agricultural productivity gaps: A case study of male preference in government policy implementation, in: Development and Change, vol. 9, no. 3, pp.439-457.[575]

Staudt, Kathleen (1978): Rural women leaders in late colonial and contemporary contexts, in: Rural Africana, no. 3, pp.5-21.[576]

Staudt, Kathleen (1980): The Umoja Federation, women’s co-optation into a local power structure, Western Political Quarterly, vol. 33, no. 2, pp.278-290.[577]

Staudt, Kathleen (1982): Women farmers and inequities in agricultural services, in: Bay, Edna G. (ed.): Women and Work in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.207-224. (und in Rural Africana, 29, 1975/76, pp.81-94.)[578]

Staudt, Kathleen (1985): Agricultural policy implementation: A case study from Kenya, Kumarian Press, West Hartford.[579]

Stichter, Sharon (1975): Women and the labour force in Kenya, 1895-1964, in: Rural Africana, no. 21, pp.45-65.[580]

Suda, Collette (1989): Different participation of men and women in production and reproduction in Kakamega District: Implications for equity, in: Journal of Developing Societies, vol. 5, no. 2, pp.234-244.[581]

Suda, Collette (1996): Gender relations in agricultural production in Kenya: Insights from Laikipia District, in: Ngware, Suleiman / Odgaard, Rie / Shayo, Rose / Wilson, Fiona (eds.): Gender and agrarian change in Tanzania, with case studies from Kenya, DUP Publishers, Dar es Salaam, pp.119-140.[582]

Suda, Collette (2000): Gender, culture and environmental conservation in Western Kenya, Contextualizing community participation and choice of techniques, in: Nordic Journal of African Studies, vol. 9, no. 1, pp.31-48.[583]

Suda, Collette (2000): The political economy of women’s work in Kenya, Chronic constraints and broken barriers, in: Ghorayshi, Parvin / Belanger, Clarie (eds.): Women, work and gender relations in developing countries, A global perspective, Greenwood Press, London, pp.75-90.[584]

Thomas, Barbara (1988): Household strategies for adaptation and change, Participation in Kenyan rural women’s associations, in: Africa, vol. 58, no. 4, pp.401-411.[585]

Thomas-Slayter, Barbara (1992): Politics, class, and gender in African resource management, The case of Rural Kenya, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 40, no. 4, pp.809-828. [586]

Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Rocheleau, Dianne (eds. (1996): Gender, environment and development in Kenya, A grassroots perspective, Lynne Riener Publishers, Boulder.[587]

Turner, Terisa / Kaara, Wahn / Brownhill, Leigh (1997): Social reconstruction in rural Africa: A gendered class analysis of women’s resistance to export crop production in Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. 18, no. 2, pp.213-238.[588]

Udvary, Monica (1988): Women’s groups near the Kenyan Coast: Patron-clientship in the development area, in: Brockensha, David / Little, Peter (eds.): Anthropology of development and change in East Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.217-235.[589]

Ventura-Dias, Vivianne (1985): Modernisation, production organisation and rural women in Kenya, in: Iftikhar, Ahmed (ed.): Technology and rural women: Conceptual and empirical issues, Allen and Unwin Publishers, London, pp.157-210.[590]

Wachtel, E. (1975): A Farm for One's Own: The rural orientation of women's group enterprises in Nakuru, Kenya, in: Rural Africana, no. 29, pp.69-81.[591]

Wacker, Corinne (1993): Participatory development planning for sustainable development with women’s groups in Kenya, in: Rodda, Annabelle (ed.): Women and the environment, Zed Books, London, pp.144-146.[592]

Wacker, Corinne (1994): Sustainable development through women’s groups: A cultural approach to sustainable development, in: Harcort, Wendy (ed.): Feminist perspectives on sustainable development, Zed Books, London, pp.128-142.[593]

Wamalwa, Betty (1991): Limits of women's groups as a viable channel for the development of women in Kenya, in: Wallace, Tine / March, Candida (eds.): Changing perceptions, Writings on gender and development, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp.245-252.[594]

Wangari, Esther / Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Rocheleau, Dianne (1996): Gendered visions for survival – Semi-arid regions in Kenya, in: Rocheleau, Dianne / Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Wangari, Ester (eds.): Feminist political ecology, Global issues and local experiences, Routledge Publications, London, pp.127-154.[595]

Wanjama, Leah / Thomas-Slayter, Barbara / Mbuthi, Njoki (1996): Adapting to resource constraints in Gikarangu, New livelihood strategies for women and men, ECOGEN, Clark University, Virginia.[596]

Wasonga, Luke (1985): A manual for extension workers in arid and semi arid zones, For promotion and management of women’s groups, Ministry of Finance and Planning Publications, Nairobi.[597]

Wawire, Violet (2003): Gender and the social and ecnomic impact of drought on the residents of Turkana District in Kenya, Gender Issues Research Report Series, no. 21, Organisation for Social Science Research in Eastern and Southern Africa, Addis Ababa.[598]

Whyte, Michael (1997): The social and cultural contexts of food production in Uganda and Kenya, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp.125-134.[599]

arts and culture

Frederikson, Bodil Folke (1994): Gender, ethnicity and popular culture in Kenya, in: European Journal of Development Research, 6, 2, pp. 52-62.[1468]

Frederikson, Bodil Folke (2000): Popular culture, gender relations and the democracy of everyday life in Kenya, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 26, no. 2, pp. 209-222.[1469]

Johnstone, Lyn (2021): Queer worldmaking in Wanuri Kahiu’s Film Rafiki, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 33, issue 1, pp.39-50.[11813]

Kapteijins, Lidwien (1999): Women`s voices in a men`s world, Women and the pastrol traditions in Northern Somali Orature, 1899-1980, Heinemann, London.[1474]

Ndati, Ndeti (2012): HIV and AIDS, Communication and secondary education in Kenya, Nairobi.[1470]

Ntarangwi, Mwenda (2003): Gender, identity and performance, Understanding Swahili cultural realities through song, Africa World Press, Trenton.[1471]

Opondo, Patricia Achieng (2002): Strategies for survival by Luo female artists in the rural environment in Kenya, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americas, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 205-226.[1472]

Prince, R.J. (2005): Popular music and Luo youth in western Kenya, Ambiguities of modernity, moral and gender relations in the era of AIDS, in: Christiansen, C. / Vigh, H. (eds.): Children and youth in contemporary Africa, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[1473]

Thiong’o, Ngugi wa (1982): Women in cultural work: The fate of Kamiriithu people’s theatre in Kenya, in: Development Dialogue, 1-2, pp. 115-133.[1475]

economy - formal and informal employment

Atumtabi, Maurice / Lutta-Mukhebi, Mary (2001): Gender and mining in Kenya, The case of Mukibira Mines in Vihiga District, in: Jenda, 2.[1666]

Buss, Doris / Katz-Lavigne, Sarah / Aluoka, Otieno / Alma, Eileen (2020): “Remembering the women of Osiri”, Women and gender in artisanal and small-scale mining in Migori County, Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 54, no. 1, pp. 177-195.[11652]

Dellantonio, Johanna (2005): “In Nairobi I have my house, upcountry I have my house” – Berufstätige Frauen zwischen Land und Stadt in Kenia, in: Stichproben, Wiener Zeitschrift für krititsche Afrikastudien, nr. 9, 5. Jg., pp. 23-36.[1667]

McCormick, Dorothy (1996): Women in business, Class and Nairobi’s small and medium-sized producers, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 193-211.[1668]

Nelson, Nici (1978): Women must help each other, The operation of personal networks among buzaa beer brewers in Mathare Valley, Kenya, in: Caplan, Pat / Bujra, J. (eds.): Women united, women divided, London, pp. 77-98.[1669]

Nelson, Nici (1978): Female centred families, Changing patterns of marriage and family among buzaa brewers of Mathare valley, in: African Urban Studies, n.s. 3, pp. 85-103.[1670]

Nelson, Nici (1979): How women and men get by: The sexual division of labour in the informal sector of a Nairobi squatter settlement, in: Gerry, C. / Bromley, R. (eds.): The casual poor in the third world cities, John Wiley and Sons Publishers, New York, pp. 283-302.[1671]

Nelson, Nici (1987): Selling her kiosk, Kikuyu women’s notion on sexuality and sex for sale in Mathere Valley, Kenya, in: Caplan, Pat (ed.): The cultural construction of sexuality, London, Routledge Publications, pp. 217-293.[1672]

Njeru, E.H.N. / Njoka, J.M. (2001): Women entrepreneurs in Nairobi: The socio-cultural factors influencing their investment patterns, in: Alila, Patrick O. / Pedersen, Poul O. (eds.): Negotiating social space: East African Micro-Enterprises, Africa World Press, Trenton.[1673]

Schloss, Johanna (1997): Dressed to „shine“: Work, leisure, and style in Malindi, Kenya, in: Hendickson, Hildi (ed.): Clothing and difference, Embodied identities in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Duke University Press, Durham, pp. 157-188.[1674]

Stichter, Sharon (1975): Women and the labour force in Kenya, 1895-1964, in: Rural Africana, 21, pp. 45-65.[1675]

Stichter, Sharon (1985): The middle class family in Kenya, changes in gender relations, in: African Urban Studies, vol. 21, pp. 39-52. (and published in: Stichter, Sharon / Parpart, Jane (eds.): Patriarchy and class, African women in the home and the work force, Boulder, pp. 177-203.)[1676]

Stichter, Sharon (1986): Women, employment and the family in Nairobi: The impact of capitalist development in Kenya, Working Papers in African Studies, no. 121, Boston University. Boston.[1677]

Stichter, Sharon (1987): Women and the family, The impact of capitalist development in Kenya, in: Schatzberg, Michael (ed.): The political economy of Kenya, New York, Praeger.[1678]

Suda, Colette (1996): The political economy of women’s work in Kenya, in: Chronic constraints and broken barriers, in: Ghorayshi, Parvin / Belanger, Claire (eds.): Women, work and gender relations in developing countries, A global perspective, Greenwood Publishers, Westport, pp. 75-70.[1679]

Suda, Colette (2002): Gender disparities in the Kenyan labour market, Implications for poverty reduction, in: Nordic Journal of African Studies, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 301-321.[1680]

Wachtel, E. (1976): Minding her own business, Women shop keepers in Nakuru, in: African Urban Notes, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 27-42.[1681]

Walz, Gabriele (1991): Nomadenfrauen als Unternehmerinnen, die Samburu Nord-Kenias als Beispiel, in: Scholz, Fred (Hg.): Nomaden, Berlin, pp. 355-369.[1682]

Wamuthenya, Wambui Rose (2010): Economic crisis and women’s employment rate in a Sub-Saharan African country, Explaining the rise in women’s employment rate in the urban area of Kenya, Working Paper no. 500, ISS, Den Haag.[1683]

Wamuthenya, Wambui Rose (2010): To what extend can disparities in compositional and structural factors account for the gender gap in unemployment in the urban areas of Kenya, Working Paper no. 502, ISS, Den Haag.[1684]

White, Luise (1987): Vice and vagrants, Prostitution, housing and casual labour in Nairobi in the mid 1930s, in: Snyder, Francis / Hay, Douglas (eds.): Struggle for the city, Migrant labour, capital and the state in urban Africa, Sage Publications, London, pp. 165-191.[1685]

White, Luise (1988): Domestic labour in a colonial city: Prostition in Nairobi, in: Stichter, Sharon / Parpart, Jane (eds.): Patriarchy and class, African women in the home and the work force, Boulder, pp.139-160.[1686]

Whiting, Beatrice (1974): The Kenyan career women: Traditional and modern, in: Kerndsin, R.B. (eds.): The anatomy of advancement, New York, William Morrow and Co.[1687]

Yieke, Felicia A. (2007): Gender and top management in discourse: The glass ceiling as a reality for women in corporate Kenya, in: Stichproben, Jg. 7, Nr. 13, pp. 31-47.[1688]

Zezela, Tiyambe (1988): Labour, unionisation and women’s participation in Kenya, Friedrich Ebert Foundation, Nairobi.[1689]

economy - Households

Clark, Mari H. (1984): Women-headed households and poverty: Insights from Kenya, in: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 338-354.[1949]

Neitzert, Monica (1994): A woman’s place: Household labour allocation in rural Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of Development Studies, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 401-427.[1950]

Oboler, R. (1994): The house-property complex in African social organization, in: Africa, 64, 3, pp. 342-375.[1951]

Oniang’o, Ruth (1995): The impact of out-migration on household livelihood and the management of natural resources, A Kenya case study, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies (IDS Bulletin), vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 54-60.[1952]

Ovis, S. (1985): Men and women in a household economy, Evidence from Kisii, Institute for Development Studies, Working Paper, no. 432, University of Nairobi.[1953]

Silberschmidt, Margarete (1991): Rethinking men and gender relations, An investigation of men, their changing roles within the household, and the implications for gender relations in Kisii District, Kenya, Centre for Development Research, CDR Research Report 16, Copenhagen.[1954]

Talle, Aud (1987): Women as Heads of Houses: The Organization of Production and the Role of Women among Pastoral Maasai in Kenya, in: Ethnos, 1-2, pp. 50-78.[1955]

Thomas, Barbara (1988): Household coping strategies for adaptation and change: Participation in Kenyan rural women's associations, in: Africa, vol. 58, no. 4, pp. 401-422.[1956]

economy - markets and traders

Akinboade, Oludele Akinloye (2005): A review of women, poverty and informal trade issues in East and Southern Africa, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 184, pp. 255-276.[2151]

Akinboade, Oludele Akinloye (2005): A review of women, poverty and informal trade issues in East and Southern Africa, in: International Social Science Journal, vol. 184, pp. 255-276.[2163]

Mitullah, Winnie (1991): Hawking as a survival strategy for the urban poor in Nairobi: The case of women, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 13-22.[2152]

Mitullah, Winnie (1991): Hawking as a survival strategy for the urban poor in Nairobi: The case of women, in: Environment and Urbanization, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 13-22.[2164]

Robertson, Claire (1993): Traders and urban struggle, Ideology and the creation of a female underclass in Nairobi, 1960-1990, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 9-42.[2153]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Comparative advantage: Women in trade in Accra, Ghana, and Nairobi, Kenya, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 99-119.[2154]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Trade, gender and poverty in the Nairobi area: Women’s strategies for survival and independence in the 1980s, in: Blumberg, Rae Lesser (eds.): Engendering wealth and well-being: Empowerment for global change, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 65-87.[2155]

Robertson, Claire (1996): Transitions in Kenyan patriarchy, Attempts to control women traders in Nairobi area, in: Sheldon, K. (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 47-71.[2156]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Gender and trade relations in Central Kenya in the late nineteent century, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 23-47.[2157]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Trouble showed the way, Women, men and trade in the Nairobi area, 1890-1990, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[2158]

Robertson, Claire (1998): Women entrepreneurs? Trade and the gender division of labour in Nairobi, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurs, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 109-127.[2159]

Robertson, Claire (1993): Traders and urban struggle, Ideology and the creation of a female underclass in Nairobi, 1960-1990, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 9-42.[2165]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Comparative advantage: Women in trade in Accra, Ghana, and Nairobi, Kenya, in: House-Midamba, Bessie / Ekechi, Felix (eds.): African market women and economic power, the role of women in African economic development, London, pp. 99-119.[2166]

Robertson, Claire (1995): Trade, gender and poverty in the Nairobi area: Women’s strategies for survival and independence in the 1980s, in: Blumberg, Rae Lesser (eds.): Engendering wealth and well-being: Empowerment for global change, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 65-87.[2167]

Robertson, Claire (1996): Transitions in Kenyan patriarchy, Attempts to control women traders in Nairobi area, in: Sheldon, K. (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 47-71.[2168]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Gender and trade relations in Central Kenya in the late nineteent century, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 23-47.[2169]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Trouble showed the way, Women, men and trade in the Nairobi area, 1890-1990, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[2170]

Robertson, Claire (1998): Women entrepreneurs? Trade and the gender division of labour in Nairobi, in: Spring, Anita / McDade, Barbara (eds.): African entrepreneurs, Theory and reality, University Press of Florida, Gainesville, pp. 109-127.[2171]

economy - pastoralism

Ahr, Christina (1991): Fruchtbarkeit und Respekt, Filmethnologische Untersuchung eines Geschlechterkonfliktes um ein Ritual bei den Maasai, Arbeiten aus dem Mainzer Institut für Ethnologie, Edition Re, Göttingen.[2327]

Best, Günther (1982): Zum Wandel der Endogamie und Exogamie zweier Nomadengruppen in Ost- und Westafrika: Turkana und Fulbe, in: Anthropos, 77, pp. 264-269.[2328]

Bianco, Barbara (1991): Women and things, Pokot motherhood as political destiny, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 18, pp. 770-785.[2329]

Bianco, Barbara (2000): Gender and material culture in West Pokot, Kenya, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 29-42.[2330]

Breman, AnneW. (1983): Women’s participation in pastoral economy, income maximation among the Rendille in: Nomadic People, vol. 12, pp. 20-35.[2331]

Broch-Due, Vigidis (1990): „Livestock speaks louder than sweet words“: Changing property and gender relations among the Turkana, in: Baxter, P.T.W. / Hogg, R. (eds.): Property, power and people, Changing rights in property and problems of pastoral development, University of Manchester Press, Manchster, pp. 147-163.[2333]

Broch-Due, Vigidis (1993): Making meaning out of matter: Perceptions of sex, gender and bodies among the Turkana, in: Broch-Due, Vigidis / Rudie, Ingrid / Bleie, Tone (eds.): Carved flesh, caste selves, Gendered symbols and social practices, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 53-82.[2334]

Broch-Due, Vigidis (1999): Creation and the multiple female body: Turkana perspectives on gender and cosmos, in: Moore, Henrietta / Sanders, Todd / Kaare, Bwire (eds.): Thoese who play with fire – Gender, fertility and transformation in East and Southern Africa, The Athlone Press, London, pp. 153-183.[2335]

Broch-Due, Vigidis (2000): The fertility of houses and herds, Producing kinship and gender among Turkana pastoralits, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 165-185.[2336]

Böhmer-Bauer, Kunigunde (1990): Nahrung, Weltbild und Gesellschaft, Ernährung und Nahrungsregeln bei den Maasai als Spiegel der gesellschaftlichen Ordnung, Saarbrücken, Breitenbach Verlag.[2332]

Chieni, Telelia / Spencer, Paul (1993): The worlds of Telelia, Reflections of a Maasai woman in Matapato, in: Spear, Thomas / Waller, Richard (eds.): Being Maasai, Ethnicity and identity in East Africa, James Currey, London, pp. 157-173.[2337]

Curry, John / Huss-Ashmore, Rebecca / Perry, Brian / Mukhebi, Adrian (1996): A framework for the analysis of gender, intra-household dynamics and lifestock disease control in Uasin Gishu District, Kenya, in. Human Ecology, vol. 24, no.2, pp. 161-190.[2338]

Dahl, Gudrun (1990): Mats and milk pots, The domain of Borana women, in: Jacobson-Widding, Anita / van Beek, Walter (eds.): The creative communication, African folk models of fertility and the regeneration of life, Alquist and Wiksell, Stockholm, pp. 129-136.[2339]

Dryson-Hudson, Rada / Meekers, Dominique (1993): The universality of marriage reconsidered: Evidence from Turkana males, in: Ethnology, 35, 4, pp. 301-302.[2340]

Dyson-Hudson, Rada / Meekers, Dominique (1998): Children of the dancing ground, children in the house, costs and benefits of marriage rules (South Turkana, Kenya), in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 54, pp. 19-47.[2341]

Ensminger, Jean (1987): Economic and political differentiation among Galole Orma women, in: Ethnos, 1-2, pp. 28-49.[2342]

Ensminger, Jean (1991): Structural transformation and its consequences for Orma women pastoralists, in: Gladwin, Christina (ed.): Structural adjustment and African women farmers, University of Florida Press, Gainesville, pp. 281-302.[2343]

Fratkin, Elliot (1989): Household variation and gender inequality in Ariaal pastoral production, Results of a stratified time-allocation survey, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 91, no. 2, pp. 430-440.[2344]

Fratkin, Elliot / Smith, Kevin (1995): Women’s changing economic roles with pastoral sedentarization: Varying strategies in alternate Rendille communities, in: Human Ecology, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 433-455.[2345]

Huss-Ashmore, Rebecca (1996): Livestock, nutrition, and intrahousehold resource control in Uasin Gishu District, Kenya, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no.2, pp. 191-214.[2346]

Kettel, Bonnie (1987): The commoditizaiton of women in Tugen (Kenya) social organisation, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Women and class in Africa, Africana Publishing Company, New York, pp. 47-61.[2347]

Kipuri, Ole Naomi (1991): The impact on the roles of pastoral women: The case of the Maasai of East Africa, in: Prah, Kwesi (ed.). Culture, gender, science, and techology in Africa, Windhoek, Harp Publications, pp. 66-79.[2348]

Kratz, Corinne / Pido, Donna (2000): Gender, ethnicity and social aesthetics in Maasai and Okiek beadwork, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 43-71.[2351]

Kratz, Corinnne (1990): Sexual solidarity and the secrets of sight and sound, Shifting gender relations and their ceremonial constitution, in: American Ethnologist, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 31-51.[2349]

Kratz, Corinnne (2003): Foraging unions and negotiating ambivalence, Personhood and complex agency in Okiek marriage arrangement, in: Masolo, Dismas / Karp, Ivan (eds.): African philosophy and cultural inquiry, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 183-228.[2350]

Little, Peter D. (1987): Women as Ol Payian (Elder): The status of widows among Il Chamus (Njemps) of Kenya, in: Ethnos, vol. 52, I-II, pp. 81-102.[2352]

Moore, Henrietta (1986): Space, text and gender, an anthropological study of the Marakwet of Kenya, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[2353]

Mullins, G. / Wahome, L. / Tsangari, P. / Maarse, L. (1996): Impacts of intensive dairy production on smallholder farm women in Coastal Kenya, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 231-254.[2354]

Nduma, Immaculate / Kristjanson, Patti / McPeak, John (2001): Diversity in income-generating Activities for sedentarized pastoral women in Northern Kenya, in: Human Organization, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 319-325.[2356]

Nestel, P. (1986): A society in transition: Developmental and seasonal influences on the nutrition of Maasai women and children, in: Food and Nutrition, vol. 8, pp. 2-18.[2355]

Ott, Elisabeth (1998): Legitimität, Angst und Schmerzen, Zwei Beispiele über physische Alltagsgewalt in Samburu, Kenia, in: Koehler, Jan / Heyer, Sonja (Hrsg.): Anthropologie der Gewalt, Chancen und Grenzen der sozialwissenschaftlichen Forschung, Verlag für Wissenschaft und Forschung, Berlin, pp. 235-244.[2359]

Ott, Elisabeth (2004): Nkanyit und Gewalt, Häusliche Gewalt gegen Frauen in Samburu zwischen Tradition und Willkür, Weißensee Verlag, Berlin.[2360]

Ott, Elisabeth (2004): Theoretische Überlegungen zur Alltagsgewalt in Samburu, in: Dilger, Hansjörg / Wolf, Angelika / Frömming, Urte Undine / Volker-Saad, Kerstin (Hrsg.): Moderne und postkoloniale Transformation, Weißensee Verlag, Berlin, pp. 88-100.[2361]

Roberts, Bruce (1996): Livestock production, age, and gender among the Keiyo of Kenya, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 215-230.[2362]

Saidi, K. (1988): Smallbusiness credit for Samburu women’s groups in Kenya, in: Rural Development in Practice, vol. 1, no. 1,pp. 9-10.[2363]

Schultz, Ulrike (1996): Von gutem und schlechtem Geld, Geldverwendung und Symbolik bei den Turkana, in: Peripherie, Nr. 62, pp. 72-94.[2364]

Schultz, Ulrike (1996): Turkana Frauen in der Stadt, Überlebensökonomie der Turkana Frauen in Lodwar, Nord Kenia, Reimer Verlag, Berlin.[2365]

Schultz, Ulrike / Scholz, Vera (1994): Wir wollen Turkana Frauen bleiben, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[2366]

Shell-Duncan, B. (1994): Child fosterage among Turkana Normadic pastoralists, in: Fratkin, E. / Galvin, K.A. / Roth, E.A. (ed.): African pastoral systems, An integrated approach, Lynne Reinner Publishers, Boulder.[2367]

Sindiga, Isaac (1987): Fertility control and population growth among the Maasai, in: Human Ecology, vol. 15, pp. 53-66.[2368]

Smith Oboler, Regina (1985): Women, power and economic change, The Nandi of Kenya, Stanford University Press, Stanford.[2357]

Smith Oboler, Regina (1996): Whose cows are they, anyway? Ideology and behaviour in Nandi cattle „ownership“ and control, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 255-272.[2358]

Smith Oboler, Regina (1996): Whose cows are they, anyway? Ideology and behaviour in Nandi cattle „ownership“ and control, in: Human Ecology, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 255-272[2370]

Smith, Kevin (1998): Sendentarisation and market integration, New opportunities for Rendille and Ariall women of Northern Kenya, in: Human Organisation, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 459-468.[2369]

Straight, Bilinda (1997): Gender, work and change among Samburu pastoralists of northern Kenya, in: Research in Economic Anthropology, vol. 18, pp. 65-91.[2371]

Straight, Bilinda (2000): Development ideologies and local knowledge among Samburu women in Northern Kenya, in: Hodgson, Dorothy (ed.): Rethinking pastoralism in Africa, Gender, culture and the myth of the patriarchal pastoralist, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 227-248.[2372]

Talle, Aud (1987): Women as Heads of Houses: The Organization of Production and the Role of Women among Pastoral Maasai in Kenya, in: Ethnos, 1-2, pp. 50-78.[2373]

Talle, Aud (1988): Women at a loss, Changes in Maasai pastoralism and its effects on gender relations, Studies in Social Anthropology, No.19, University of Stockholm.[2374]

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Nyambedha, Erick Otieno / Simiyu, Wandibba / Aargaard-Hansen, Jens (2003): Changing patterns of orphan care due to the HIV epidemic in Western Kenya, in: Social Science and Medicine, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 301-311.[4579]

Nzioka, Charles (2004): Unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection among young women in rural Kenya, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 31-44.[4580]

Nzioka, Charles (2009): Willing fathers, reluctant parents, Young men’s perspectives on unwanted pregnancies and abortion in Kenya, OSSREA, Addis Abeba.[4581]

Omondi, Odhiambo Charles / Ayiemba, E.H.O. (1997): Men’s participation in family planning decisions in Kenya, in: Population Studies, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 29-40.[4582]

Omondi, Odhiambo Charles / Ayiemba, E.H.O. (2003): Contraceptive use dynamics among migrant women in Kenya, in: African Population Studies, vol. 18, pp. 69-90.[4583]

Omwanda, Lewis (2000): Beyond the economic calculus: Risk factors associated with high order births among Kenyan women up to the 1990s, in: African Population Studies, vol. 15, pp. 1-21.[4584]

Paolisso, Michael / Braksh, Michael / Thomas, Conley (1989): Women’s agricultural work, child care and infant diarrhea in rural Kenya, in: Leslie, Joanne / Paolisso, Michael (eds.): Women, work, and child welfare in the third world, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 217-236.[4585]

Pedersen, Susan (1991): National bodies, unspeakable acts, The sexual politics of colonial policy making, in: Journal of Modern History, vol. 63, pp. 647-680.[4586]

Price, Neil (1996): The changing value of children among the Kikuyu of central province, Kenya, in. Africa, vol. 66, no. 3, pp. 411-436.[4587]

Reynolds, H.W. / Toroitich-Ruto, C. / Nasution, M. et al. (2008): Effectiveness of training supervisors to improve reproductive health quality of care, A cluster randomized trial in Kenya, in: Health Policy and Planning, vol. 23, pp. 56-66.[4588]

Rubin, D.S. (1990): Women’s work and children’s nutrition in south-western Kenya, in: Food and Nutrition Bulletin, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 269-281.[4589]

Rutenberg, Naomi / Watkins, Susan Cotts (1997): The buzz outside the clinics, Conversations and contraception in Nyanza Province, Kenya, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 290-307.[4590]

Stoskopf, Carleen et al. (2002): Factors related to condome use among young people in Kenya, in: International Quarterly of Community Health Education, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 193-208.[4591]

Talle, Aud (1998): Female and male in Maasai life, Aging and fertility, in: Aguilar, Mario (ed.): The politics of age and gerontocracy in Africa, Ethnographies of the past and memories of the present, Africa World Press, Trenton, pp. 125-137.[4592]

Talle, Aud (2007): 'Serious games', Licences and prohibitions in Maasai sexual life, in: Africa, vol. 77, no. 3, pp. 351-370.[4593]

Thomas, Lynn (1997): Ngaitana (I will circumcise myself): The gender and generational politics of the 1956 ban on clitoridectomy in Meru, Kenya, in: Hunt, Nancy Rose / Lui, Tessie / Quataert, Jean (eds.): Gendered colonialisms in African history, pp. 16-41. (und in: Gender and History, 8, 1996, pp. 338-363).[4594]

Thomas, Lynn (1998): Imperial concerns and „women’s affairs“: State efforts to regulate clitorydectomy and eradicate abortion in Meru, Kenya, c.1910-1950, in: Journal of African History, vol. 39, pp. 121-145.[4595]

Thomas, Lynn (2003): Politics of the womb - Women, reproduction and the state in Kenya, University of California Press, Berkeley.[4596]

Udvary, Monica (1991): Gender, power and fragmentation of fertility among the Giriama of Kenya, in: Jacobson-Widding, Anita (ed.): Body and space, Symbolic models of unity and division in African cosmology and experience, Stockholm - Uppsala, pp. 143-173.[4597]

Way, Ann A. / Cross, Anne R. / Kumar, Sushil (1987): Family planning in Botswana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 13, pp. 7-11.[4598]

Westhoff, Charles (1995): The mass media and family planning in Kenya, in: International Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 26-31.[4599]

Zulu, Eliya M. / Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo / Ezeh, Alex (2004): Urbanization, poverty and sex, Roots of risky sexual behaviour in slum settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel / Craddock, Susan et al. (eds.): HIV & AIDS in Africa, Beyond epidemiology, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, pp. 167-174.[4600]

health

Amuyunzu-Nyamongo, Mary (1998): Willing the spirits to reveal themselves: Rural Kenyan mother's responsibility to restore their children's health, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 12, pp. 490-502.[5037]

Kanogo, Tabitha (2001): The medicalization of maternity in colonial Kenya, in: Odhiambo, Atieno (ed.): African historians and African voices, Basler Afrika Bibliographien, Basel, pp. 75-113.[5038]

Opole, Monica (1991): Women`s indigenous knowledge base in the translation of nutritional and medical value of ediable local plants in Western Kenya, in: Prah, Kwesi (ed.): Culture, Gender, Science and technology in Africa, Harp Publishers, Windhoek, pp. 81-95.[5039]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Anderson, D. M. (2010): ‘Sexual threat and settler society, “black perils” in Kenya, c.1907–30’, in: Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History vol. 38, no. 1, pp. 47–74.[11675]

Blacker, John (2007): The demography of Mau Mau, Fertility and mortality in Kenya in the 1950s, A demographer’s viewpoint, in: African Affairs, 106, pp. 205-227.[5272]

Bujra, Janet (1975): Women entrepreneurs in early Nairobi, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, 9, 2, pp. 213-234. (and published in: Sumner, Colin (ed.): Crime, justice and underdevelopment, Heinemann, London 1982).[5273]

Davison, Jean (1996): Voices from Mutira, Changes in lives of Rural Gikuyu Women, 1900-1995, Westview Press, Boulder.[5274]

Eastman, Carol (1988): Women, slaves, and foreigners, African cultural influences and group processes and the formation of the Northern Swahili Coast, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 1-20.[5275]

Hay, Margaret J (1982): Women as owners, occupants and managers of property in colonial Western Kenya, in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston University Publications, Boston, pp. 110-124.[5277]

Hay, Margaret J. (1976): Luo women and economic change during the colonial period, in: Hafkin, Nancy J. / Bay, Edna G. (ed.): Women in Africa, Studies in social and economic change, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 87-109.[5276]

Hetherington, Penelope (1998): The politics of female circumcision in the Province of Colonial Kenya, 1920-1930, in: Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 93-126.[5278]

Hetherington, Penelope (2001): Generational changes in marriage pattern in the Central Province of Kenya, 1930-1990, in: Journal of African and Asian Studies, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 163-179.[5279]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2002): Gender dimensions of law, colonialism and inheritance in East Africa, Kenyan women’s experiences, in: Verfassung und Recht in Übersee, 35, 3, pp. 373-387.[5280]

Kanogo, Tabitha (2004): African womanhood in colonial Kenya, 1900-1950, James Currey, Oxford.[5281]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1991): Political economy of the environment, gender and resistance under colonialism: Murang’a District, Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 226-256.[5282]

Martin, Carolyn (1995): Colonial inscriptions, Race, sex and class in Kenya, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[5283]

McClintock, Anne (1991): The scandal of the whorearchy: Prostitution in colonial Nairobi, in: Transition, vol. 52, pp. 92-99.[5284]

Mutongi, Kenda (1999): Worries of the heart: Widowed mothers, daughters and masculinities in Maragoli, Western Kenya, 1950-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 67-86.[5285]

Nasimiyu, Ruth (1985): Women in the colonial economy of Bungoma: The role of women in agriculture, 1902-1960, in: Journal of African Research and Development, vol. 15, pp. 56-73.[5286]

Nasimiyu, Ruth (1997): Changing women’s rights over property in Western Kenya, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp. 283-298.[5287]

Natsoulas, Theodore (1998): The politization of the ban of female circumcision and the rise of the independent school movement in Kenya, the KCA, the missions and the government, 1929-1932, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 137-158.[5288]

Ochwada, Hannington (1995): Gender analysis: The stunted discourse in Kenya’s historiography, in: Africa Development, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 11-28.[5289]

Ochwada, Hannington (1997): Politics and gender relations in Kenya, A historical perspective, in: Africa Development, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 123-139.[5290]

Ogutu, M.A. (1985): The changing role of women in the commercial history of Busa District in Kenya, 1900-1983, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 15, pp. 74-90.[5291]

Okeyo, Pala Achola (1980): Daughters of the lakes and rivers: Colonization and land rights of Luo women, in: Etienne, Mona / Leacock, Eleanor (eds.): Women and colonization, Praeger Publishers, New York, pp. 186-213.[5292]

Otieno, Wamuio Waiyaki (1998): Mau Mau’s daughter: The life history of Wambui Waiyaki Otieno, Lynne Rienner Publications, Boulder.[5293]

Pedersen, Susan (1991): National bodies, unspeakable acts, The sexual politics of colonial policy making, in: Journal of Modern History, vol. 63, pp. 647-680.[5294]

Presley, Cora Ann (1986): Kikuyu women in Mau-Mau rebellion, in: Okihiro, Gary (ed.): In resistance, Studies in African, Afro-American, and Carribean resistance, University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst.[5295]

Presley, Cora Ann (1986): Labour unrest among Kikuyu women in colonial Kenya, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Women and class in Africa, New York, Africana Publishing, pp. 216-236.[5296]

Presley, Cora Ann (1988): Mau Mau rebellion, Kikuyu women and social change, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, 22, pp. 503-527.[5297]

Presley, Cora Ann (1990): Kikuyu women, the Mau Mau rebellion, and social change in Kenya, Westview Press, Boulder.[5298]

Presley, Cora Ann (1994): The Mau Mau rebellion, Kikuyu women, and social change, in: Crenshaw, Martha (ed.): Terrorism in Africa, G.K. Hall Publishers, New York, pp. 205-230.[5299]

Presley, Cora Ann (2002): Gender and political struggle in Kenya, 1948-1998, in: Higgs, Catherine / Moss, Barbara / Ferguson, Earline (eds.): Stepping forward, Black women in Africa and the Americas, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 173-188.[5300]

Robertson, Claire (1993): Traders and urban struggle, Ideology and the creation of a female underclass in Nairobi, 1960-1990, in: Journal of Women’s History, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 9-42.[5301]

Robertson, Claire (1996): Grassroots in Kenya: Women, genital mutilation and collective action, 1920-1990, in: Signs, Journal of Culture and Society, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 615-642.[5302]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Gender and trade relations in Central Kenya in the late nineteenth century, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 23-47.[5303]

Robertson, Claire (1997): Trouble showed the way, Women, men and trade in the Nairobi area, 1890-1990, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[5304]

Shadle, Brett (1999): Changing traditions to meet current alterning conditions: Customary law, African courts, and the rejection of codification in Kenya, 1930-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, pp. 411-431.[5305]

Shadle, Brett (2006): Girls cases, Marriage and colonialism in Kenya, 1890-1970, Heinemann,Oxford.[5306]

Shaw, Carolyn Martin (1995): Colonial Insriptions, Race, Sex and class in Kenya, University of Minnesota Press, Minneapolis.[5307]

Staudt, Kathleen A. (1978): Rural women leaders, Late colonial and contemporary contexts, in: Rural Africana, no. 2, pp. 5-21.[5308]

Stichter, Sharon (1975): Women and the labour force in Kenya, 1895-1964, in: Rural Africana, 21, pp. 45-65.[5309]

Strobel, Margaret (1983): Slavery and reproductive labour in Mombasa, in: Robertson, Claire / Klein, Martin (eds.): Women and slavery in Africa, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 111-129.[5310]

Thomas, Lynn (1997): Ngaitana (I will circumcise myself): The gender and generational politics of the1956 ban on clitoridectomy in Meru, Kenya, in: Hunt, Nancy Rose / Lui, Tessie / Quataert, Jean (eds.): Gendered colonialisms in African history, pp. 16-41. (und in: Gender and History, 8, 1996, pp. 338-363).[5311]

Thomas, Lynn (1998): Imperial concers and „women’s affairs“: State efforts to regulate clitorydectomy and eradicate abortion in Meru, Kenya, c.1910-1950, in: Journal of African History, vol. 39, pp. 121-145.[5312]

Thomas, Lynn (2003): Politics of the womb - Women, reproduction and the state in Kenya, University of California Press, Berkeley.[5313]

Tibbetts, Alexandra (1994): Mamas fighting for freedom in Kenya, in: Africa Today, no. 4, pp. 27-48.[5314]

White, Luise (1983): A colonial state and an African petty bourgeoise: Population, property and class struggle in Nairobi, 1936-1940, in: Cooper, Fred (ed.): Struggle for the city, ULA Press, Beverly Hills, pp. 167-194.[5315]

White, Luise (1986): Prostitution, identity and class consciousness in Nairobi during World War II, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 255-273.[5316]

White, Luise (1987): Vice and vagrants, Prostitution, housing and casual labour in Nairobi in the mid 1930s, in: Snyder, Francis / Hay, Douglas (eds.): Struggle for the city, Migrant labour, capital and the state in urban Africa, Sage Publications, London, pp. 165-191.[5317]

White, Luise (1988): Domestic labour in a colonial city: Prostition in Nairobi, in: Stichter, Sharon / Parpart, Jane (eds.): Patriarchy and class, African women in the home and the work force, Boulder, pp. 139-160.[5318]

White, Luise (1990): The comforts of home, Prostition in colonial Nairobi, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[5319]

White, Luise (1990): Body fluids and usufruct, Controlling property in Nairobi, 1917-1939, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 418-438.[5320]

White, Luise (1992): Separating the men from the boys, Construction of gender, sexuality and territorism in Central Kenya, 1939-1959, in: International Journal of Afrian Historical Research, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 1-25[5321]

Wipper, Audrey (1985): Riot and rebellion among African women: Three examples of political clout, Working Paper 108, Michigan State University. (and in: O’Barr, Jean F. (eds.): Perspectives on power: Women in Africa, Asia and Latin America, Durham, pp. 50-72.)[5322]

Wipper, Audrey (1989): Kikuyu women and the Harry Thuku disturbances, Some uniformities of female militancy, in: Africa, 59, 3, pp. 300-337.[5323]

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Nzomo, Maria (1997): Kenyan women in politics and public decision making, in: Mikell, Gwendolyn (eds.): African feminism, The politics of survival in Sub-Saharan Africa, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, pp. 282-256.[7241]

Nzomo, Maria (1998): Kenya, The women’s movement and democratic change, Villalón, Leonardo / Huxtable, Phillip (eds.): The African state at a critical juncture, Between disintegration and reconfiguration, Lynne Rienner Publishers, London, pp. 167-184.[7242]

Nzomo, Maria / Staudt, Kathleen (1994): Man made political machinery in Kenya, Political space for women? in: Nelson, B.J. / Chowdhury, N. (eds.): Women and politics world wide, New Haven, Yale University Press, pp. 415-435.[7243]

Ochwada, Hannington (1997): Politics and gender relations in Kenya, A historical perspective, in: Africa Development, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 123-139.[7244]

Sabar-Friedman, Galia (1995): „Politics“ and „power“ in the Kenyan public discourse and recent events: The church of the Province of Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 429-453.[7245]

Sahle, Eunice Njeri (1998): Women and political participation in Kenya, Evaluating the interplay of gender, ethnicity, class and state, in: Mbaku, John (ed.): Multiparty democracy and political change, Ashgate Publishers, Aldershot, pp. 171-183.[7246]

Stamp, Patricia (1991): Burying Otieno: The politics of gender and ethnicity in Kenya, in: Signs, Journal of Women in Culture and Society, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 808-845.[7247]

Stamp, Patricia (1995): Mothers of invention, Women’s agency in the Kenyan state, in: Gardiner, J.K. (ed.): Provoking agents, Gender and theory in practice, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, pp. 69-92.[7248]

Staudt, Kathleen A. (1978): Administrative resources, political patrons, and redressing sex inequalities, The case from Western Kenya, in: The Journal of Developing Areas, vol. 12, no. 4, pp. 399-314.[7249]

Staudt, Kathleen A. (1978): Rural women leaders, Late colonial and contemporary contexts, in: Rural Africana, no. 2, pp. 5-21.[7250]

Staudt, Kathleen A. (1982): The Umoja Federation, The cooptation into a local power structure, in: Western Political Quarterly, 33, 2, pp. 278-290.[7251]

Thomas, Lynn (2003): Politics of the womb - Women, reproduction and the state in Kenya, University of California Press, Berkeley.[7252]

Thomas-Slayter, Barbara (1992): Politics, class, and gender in African resource management, The case of rural Kenya, in: Economic Development and Cultural Change, vol. 40, no. 4, pp. 809-828.[7253]

Thomas-Slayter, Barbara (1997): Gender, resources, local institutions: New identities for Kenya's rural women, in: Collins, Robert O. (ed.): Problems in the history of modern Africa, Markus Wiener Publishers, New Yersey.[7254]

Religion - Christianity

Dolan, Catherine (1998): Conflict and compliance, Cristianity and the occult in horticultural exporting, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, religion and spirituality, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 23-30.[7644]

Hodgeson, Dorothy (2005): The church of women, Gendered encounters between Maasai and missionaries, Indiana University Press, Bloomington.[7645]

Hoehler-Fatton, Cyntia (1996): Women of fire and spirit, History, faith, and gender in Roho religion in Western Kenya, Oxford University Press, Oxford.[7646]

Kanogo, Tabitha (1993): Mission impact on women in colonial Kenya, in: Bowie, Fiona / Kirkwood, Deborah / Ardener, Shirley (eds.): Women and missions, Past and present, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 165-186.[7648]

Koevering, Helen van (2005): Dancing their dreams, The Lakeshore Nyanja women of the Anglican diocese of Niassa, Kachere Books, Blantyre.[7647]

Murray, Joycelyn (1977): The church missionary society and the „female circumcision issue“ in Kenya, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 8, pp. 92-104.[7649]

Natsoulas, Theodore (1998): The politization of the ban of female circumcision and the rise of the independent school movement in Kenya, the KCA, the missions and the government, 1929-1932, in: Journal of Asian and African Studies, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 137-158.[7650]

Sabar-Friedman, Galia (1995): „Politics“ and „power“ in the Kenyan public discourse and recent events: The church of the Province of Kenya, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 429-453.[7651]

Spencer, Leon (1973): Defence and protection of converts, Kenya mission and the inheritance of Christian widows, 1912-1931, in: Journal of Religion in Africa, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 107-124.[7652]

Thomas, Samuel (2000): Transforming the gospel of domesticity, Luhya girls and the Friends Africa Mission, 1917-1925, in: African Studies Review, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 1-27.[7653]

Religion - Islam

Alidou, Ousseina (2013): Muslim women in postcolonial Kenya, Leadership, representation, and social change, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.[7829]

Alidou, Ousseina D. (2013): Muslim Women in Postcolonial Kenya, Leadership, Representation, and Social Change, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison. [11855]

Beck, Rose-Marie / Schmidt, Elenore (1993): Leso, Spiegel islamischer Frauenkultur in Mombasa, in: Forkl, Hermann (Hg.): Die Gärten des Islam, Edition Mayer, Stuttgart, pp. 315-316.[7830]

Brown, Beverly (1993): Islamic laws, Qadhi's courts and Muslim women's legal status: The case of Kenya, in: Journal of the Institute of Muslim Minority Affairs, vol. 14.[7831]

Caplan, Patricia (1984): Cognatic descent, Islamic law and women’s property on the East African coast, in: Hirshon, René (eds.): Women and property, women as property, London, pp. 23-43.[7832]

Curtin, Patricia Romero (1984): Weddings in Lamu, Kenya, An example of social and economic change, in: Cahiers d’ Etudes Africaines, 94, 24, pp. 131-145.[7833]

Fuglesang, Minou (1994): Veils and videos, Female youth culture on the Kenyan coast, Stockholm Studies in Social Anthropology, Stockholm.[7834]

Giles, I. (1987): Posession cults of the Swahili Coast, a re-examination of theories of marginality, in: Africa, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 234-258.[7835]

Gomm, R. (1975): Bargaining from weakness, Spirit possession on the South Kenya Coast, in: Man, 10, pp. 530-543.[7836]

Hirsch, Susan (1998): Pronouncing and perserving, Gender and the discourses of disputing in an African Islamic court, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[7837]

Strobel, Margaret (1975): Women’s wedding celebrations in Mombasa, Kenya, in: African Studies Review, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 35-45.[7838]

Strobel, Margaret (1976): From Lelemama to lobbying: Women’s associations in Mombasa, in: Hafkin, Nancy / Bay, Edna (eds.): Women in Africa, Studies in Social and Economic Change, Stanford.[7839]

Strobel, Margaret (1979): Muslim women in Mombasa, 1890-1975, Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn.[7840]

Swartz, Marc (1982): The isolation of men and the happiness of women, Sources and uses of power in Swahili marital relations, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 38, pp. 26-44.[7841]

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

Amuyunzu-Nyamongo, Mary (1998): Willing the spirits to reveal themselves: Rural Kenyan mother's responsibility to restore their children's health, in: Medical Anthropology Quarterly, vol. 12, pp. 490-502.[10243]

Behrend, Heike (1987): Die Zeit geht krumme Wege, Raum, Zeit und Ritual bei den Tugen im Nordwesten Kenias, Frankfurt.[10244]

Ciekawy, Diane (1999): Women’s work and the construction of witchcraft accusations in coastal Kenya, in: Women’s Studies International Forum, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 225-237.[10245]

Dolan, Catherine (1998): Conflict and compliance, Cristianity and the occult in horticultural exporting, in: Sweetman, Caroline (ed.): Gender, religion and spirituality, Oxfam Publications, Oxford, pp. 23-30.[10246]

Dolan, Catherine (2002): Gender and witchcraft in agrarian transition, The case of Kenyan horticulture, in: Development and Change, vol. 33, no. 4, pp. 659-681.[10247]

Giles, I. (1987): Posession cults of the Swahili Coast, a re-examination of theories of marginality, in: Africa, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 234-258.[10250]

Gomm, Roger (1979): Bargaining from weakness, Spirit possession on the South Kenya coast, in: Tiffany, Sharon (ed.): Women and society, An anthropological reader, Eden Press, Montreal.[10251]

Hodgson, Dorothy (1997): Embodying the contradictions of modernity, Gender and spirit possession among Maasai in Tanzania, in: Grosz-Ngate, Maria / Kokole, Omari (eds.): Cultural encounters: Gender at the intersection of the local and the global in Africa, Routledge Publishers, New York, pp. 111-129.[10248]

Hoehler-Fatton, Cynthia (1996): Women of fire and spirit, History, faith, and gender in Roho religion in Western Kenya, Oxford University Press, New York.[10249]

LeVine, Robert A. (1962): Witchcraft and co-wife proximity in South Western Kenya, in: Ethnology, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 39-45.[10252]

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

Edgerton, Robert / Conant, Frances (1964): Kilapat, The “shaming party” among the Pokot of East Africa, in: South Western Journal of Anthropology, 20, pp. 404-418.[10451]

Human Rights Watch (2003): Double standards, women’s property rights violations in Kenya, Human Rights Watch, vol. 15, no. 5, New York.[10452]

Hynd, Stacey (2010): Narratives of spousal killing and domestic violence in murder trials in Kenya and Nyassaland, c.1930-1956, in: Burrill, Emily / Roberts, Richard / Thornberry, Elizabeth (eds.): Domestic violence and the law in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 159-178.[10453]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2000): Violence against women in Kenya, An analysis of law, policy and institutions, IELRC Working Paper no. 1, Nairobi/Geneva.[10457]

Lalor, Kevin (2004): Child sexual abuse in Tanzania and Kenya, in: Child Abuse and Neglect, 1, pp. 833-844.[10454]

LeVine, Robert (1959): Gusii sex offenses, A study of social control, in: American Anthropologist, vol. 61, pp. 965-999.[10455]

Luongo, Katherine (2010): Domestic dramas and occult acts, Witchcraft and violence in the arena of the intimate, in: Burrill, Emily / Roberts, Richard / Thornberry, Elizabeth (eds.): Domestic violence and the law in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Ohio University Press, Athens, pp. 179-200.[10456]

Muchina, Pauline (2000): What are you doing to stop violence against women and girls in Africa? In: Barstow, Anne Llewellyn (eds.): War’s dirty secrets, Rape, prostitution, and other crimes against women, The Pilgrim Press, Cleveland, pp. 101-123.[10458]

Njue, Carolyne / Askew, Ian / Chege, Jane (2005): Non-consensual sexual experiences of young people in Kenya, Boys as perpetrators and victims, in: Jejeebhoy, Shireen / Shah, Iqbal / Thapa, Shyam (eds.): Sex without consent, Young people in developing countries, Zed Books, London.[10459]

Omale, Juliana (2000): Tested to their limit, Sexual harassment in schools and educational institutions in Kenya, in: Mirsky, Judith / Radlett, Marty (eds.): No paradise yet, The world’s women face the new century, Zed Books, London, pp. 19-38.[10460]

Ott, Elisabeth (1998): Legitimität, Angst und Schmerzen, Zwei Beispiele über physische Alltagsgewalt in Samburu, Kenia, in: Koehler, Jan / Heyer, Sonja (Hrsg.): Anthropologie der Gewalt, Chancen und Grenzen der sozialwissenschaftlichen Forschung, Verlag für Wissenschaft und Forschung, Berlin, pp. 235-244.[10463]

Ott, Elisabeth (2004): Nkanyit und Gewalt, Häusliche Gewalt gegen Frauen in Samburu zwischen Tradition und Willkür, Weißensee Verlag, Berlin.[10464]

Ott, Elisabeth (2004): Theoretische Überlegungen zur Alltagsgewalt in Samburu, in: Dilger, Hansjörg / Wolf, Angelika / Frömming, Urte Undine / Volker-Saad, Kerstin (Hrsg.): Moderne und postkoloniale Transformation, Weißensee Verlag, Berlin, pp. 88-100.[10465]

Ott, Lisa (1998): Legitimität, Angst und Schmerzen, Zwei Beispiele über physische Alltagsgewalt gegen Frauen in Samburu, Kenia, in: Koehler, Jan / Heyer, Sonja (Hg.): Anthropologie der Gewalt, Chancen und Grenzen der sozialwissenschaftlichen Forschung, Verlag für Wissenschaft und Forschung, Berlin, pp. 235-244.[10461]

Ott, Lisa (2004): Nkanyit und Gewalt, Häusliche Gewalt gegen Frauen in Samburu zwischen Tradition und Willkür, Weißensee Verlag, Berlin.[10462]

Shadle, Brett (2008): Rape in the courts of Gusiiland, Kenya, 1940s-1960s, in: African Studies Review, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 27-50.[10466]

Stavropoulos, J. (2006): Violence against girls, A retrospective survey in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda, in: African Child Policy Forum.[10468]

Steevens, Leslie (1997): Gender violence and the press, The Kizito story, Ohio University Centre for International Studies, Monographs in International Studies, Africa Series, no. 67, Athens.[10467]

Wamalwa, Betty (1989): Violence against wives in Kenya, in: Mbeo, Adhiambo / Ooko-Ombaka, Oki (eds.): Women and law in Kenya, Perspectives and emerging issues, Public Law Institute, Nairobi, pp. 71-78.[10469]

Wamue, Grace / Getui, Mary N. (eds.) (1996): Violence against women: Reflections by Kenyan women theologians, Acton Publishers, Nairobi.[10470]

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

Agimba, Christine Anyango (1987): An examination of the legal status of the Kenyan woman in the area of personal law, A study of the Wambui Otieno case, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 10, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11006]

Aliber, Michael / Walker, Cherryl et al. (2006): The impact of HIV/AIDS on land rights, Perspectives from Kenya, in: World Development, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 704-727.[11008]

Aliber, Michael / Walker, Cherryl et al. (2004): Impact of HIV/AIDS on land rights, Case studies from Kenya, Human Science Research Council, Pretoria.[11007]

Bottelberge, Sarah (2003): The construction of gender in Luo Land, Kenya, in: Chachage, C.S.L. / Mbilinyi, Marjorie J. (eds.): Against neoliberalism: Gender, democracy and development. E & D Ltd. Dar es Salaam.[11009]

Bowman, Cynthia Grant / Kuenyehia, Akua (eds.) (2003): Women and law in Sub-Saharan Africa, Sedco Publishing, Accra.[11010]

Brown, Beverly (1993): Islamic laws, Qadhi's courts and Muslim women's legal status: The case of Kenya, in: Journal of the Institute of Muslim Minority Affairs, vol. 14.[11011]

Caplan, Patricia (1984): Cognatic descent, Islamic law and women’s property on the East African coast, in: Hirshon, René (eds.): Women and property, women as property, London, pp. 23-43.[11012]

Clark, Carolyn M. (1980): Land and food, Women and power in nineteenth century Kikuyu, in: Africa, vol. 50, no. 4, pp. 357-370.[11013]

COVAW (2002): In pursuit of justice: A research report on service providers' response to cases of violence against women in Nairobi Province, COVAW, Nairobi.[11014]

Davison, Jean (1987): Without Land We are Nothing: The Effects of Land Tenure Politics and Practices upon Rural Women in Kenya, in: Rural Africana, n.s., vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 19-33.[11015]

Davison, Jean (1988): Who Owns What? Land Registration and Tensions in Gender Relations of Production in Kenya, in: Davison, Jean (ed.): Agriculture, Women and Land, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 157-174.[11016]

Dawuni, Jarpa (ed.) (2021): Gender, Judging and the Courts in Africa, Selected studies, Routledge, London.[11633]

Doren, John van (1989): Death African style, The case of SM Otieno, in: American Journal of Comparative Law, 3, pp. 329-350.[11017]

Drimie, S. (2002): The impact of HIV/AIDS on land, Case studies from Kenya, Lesotho and South Africa, A synthesis report, FAO, Rome.[11018]

FIDA (1996): Second class citizenship: The FIDA annual report on the legal status of Kenyan women for 1996, FIDA, Nairobi.[11019]

FIDA (2002): Police training manual on gender and human rights, FIDA, Nairobi.[11020]

FIDA (2002): Reproductive rights in Kenya: From reality to action? FIDA, Nairobi.[11021]

Gordon, April (1995): Gender, ethnicity and class in Kenya: „Burying Otieno’ Revisited, in: Signs, 20, pp. 883-912.[11022]

Gwako, Edwin Laban Moogi (1998): Widow inheritance among the Maragoli of Western Kenya, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 54, pp. 173-198.[11023]

Hakansson, Thomas (1988): Bridewealth, Women and land, Social change among the Gusii of Kenya, Almqvist and Wiksell, Uppsala.[11024]

Hasci, Naima (1999): Somali refugee women’s rights in Kenya, The gap between policy and practice, in: Fox, Diana / Hasci, Naima (eds): The challenges of women’s activism and human rights in Africa, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, pp. 115-141.[11025]

Hay, Margaret J. (1982): Women as owners, occupants and managers of property in colonial Western Kenya, in: Hay, Margaret / Wright, Marcia (eds.): African women and the law, Historical perspectives, Boston, pp. 110-124.[11026]

Hirsch, Susan (1998): Pronouncing and perserving, Gender at the discourses of disputing in an African Islamic court, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.[11027]

Human Rights Watch (2003): Double standards, Women’s property rights violations in Kenya, Human Rights Watch Publications, 15, 5, New York / Washington D.C.[11028]

Ikdahl, I. / Kameri-Mbote, Patricia et al. (2005): Human rights, formalisation of women’s land rights in Southern and Eastern Africa, IELRC Working Paper, no. 7, Nairobi.[11029]

Kabeberi, Janet (1988): Women and ownership of property in Kenya, Towards equal inequality, Working Papers in Women’s Law, no. 13, Institute of Women’s Law, University of Oslo, Oslo.[11030]

Kabeberi-Macharia, Janet / Nyamu, Celstine (1998): Marriage by affidayit, Developing alternative laws on cohabitation in Kenya, in: Eekelaar, John / Nhlapo, Thandabantu (eds.): The changing family – International perspectives on the family and family law, Hart Publishing, Oxford, pp. 197-216.[11031]

Kaduru, Rosemary Awino (1986): Kenya, Legal service for rural women, in: Schuler, Margaret (ed.): Empowerment and the law, Strategies of Third World Women, OEF Publications, Washington D.C., pp. 236-243.[11038]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2000): Violence against women in Kenya, An analysis of law, policy and institutions, IELRC Working Paper no. 1, Nairobi.[11032]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2002): Gender dimensions of law, colonialism and inheritance in East Africa, Kenyan women’s experiences, in: Verfassung und Recht in Übersee, 35, 3, pp. 373-387.[11033]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2003): Gender considerations in constitution-making, Engendering women’s rights in the legal process, in: University of Nairobi Law Journal, pp. 156-163.[11034]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2004): The coverage of gender issues in the Draft Bill of the Constitution of Kenya 2002, Have the hens finally come home to roost for Kenyan women? In: University of Nairobi Law Journal, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-14.[11035]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2005): The land has tis owners! Gender issues in land tenure under customary law in Kenya, IELRC Working Paper no. 9, Nairobi.[11036]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (2006): Women’s land rights and the environment, The Kenyan experience, in: Development, vol. 49, no. 3, pp. 43-48.[11037]

Kameri-Mbote, Patricia (1995): The law of succession in Kenya: Gender perspectives in property management and control, Women and Law in East Africa (WLEA), Nairobi.[11039]

Kibvana, Kivutha / Mute, Lawrence (eds.) (2000): Law and the quest for gender equality in Kenya, Claripress, Nairobi.[11040]

Lee Smith, Diana (1996): Women`s and men`s rights to land in Eastern Africa, in: Schlyter, Ann (ed.): A place to live, Gender research on housing in Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 47-63.[11041]

Lehmwald, Alexandra (2007): Gender und Landrechte, Kenia, Genderbox, Internet-Recherche/Deskstudie zu Gender und Landrechten, Wiener Institut für Entwicklungsfragen und Zusammenarbeit, Wien.[11042]

Maas, Maria (1986): It is always good to have land, Women’s groups in Kiambu, Kenya, African Studies Centre, Research Report, No. 26, Leiden.[11043]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1990): Gender and land rights in Morang’se district, Kenya, in: Journal of Peasant Studies, vol. 17, no. 4 pp. 609-643.[11044]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1990): Without a woman there is no land, Marriage and land rights in smallholder agriculture, Kenya, in: Resources for Feminist Research, vol. 19, no. 3-4, pp. 68-74.[11045]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1995): A farm is like a child who cannot be left unguarded, Gender, Land and Labour in Central Province, Kenya, in: Bulletin of the Institute of Development Studies (IDS Bulletin), vol. 26, pp. 12-23.[11046]

Mackenzie, Fiona (1997): Changing women’s rights over property in Western Kenya, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp. 283-298.[11047]

Mak, K. (2005): Engendering property rights: Women's insecure land tenure and its implications for development policy in Kenya and Uganda, in: Journal of Public and International Affairs, vol. 16, pp. 145-166.[11050]

Mayambala, Ester (1996): Changing the terms of the debate: Polygamy and the rights of women in Kenya and Uganda, in: East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights, 3, 2, pp. 200–238.[11053]

Mbeo, Mary Adhiambo (ed.) (1989): Women and the law in Kenya, Public Law Institute, Nairobi.[11048]

Mbugua, Jane / Kamau Mubuu (2001): Gender dimensions of politics, law and violence in Kenya, Women and Law in East Africa (WLEA), International Commission of Jurists (ICJ) and International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA-Kenya), Nairobi.[11049]

Munyakho, Dorothy (1994): Kenyan women press for land rights, in: African Farmer, no. 11, pp. 8-9.[11051]

Munyakho, Dorothy (2000): Less than human treatment, maternity protection in Kenya, in: Mirsky, Judith / Radlett, Marty (eds.): No paradise yet, The world’s women face the new century, Zed Books, London.[11052]

Muteshi, Jacinta (1998): A refusal to argue with inconvenient evidence, Women Proprietorship and Kenyan law, in: Dialectical Anthropology, vol. 23, pp. 55-81.[11055]

Mutongi, Kenda (1999): Worries of the heart: Widowed mothers, daughters and masculinities in Maragoli, Western Kenya, 1950-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 67-86.[11054]

Nagel, Mechthild (2005): Environment justice and women’s rights, A tribute to Wangari Maathai, in: Wagadu, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 1-7. [11056]

Nasimiyu, Ruth (1997): Changing women’s rights over property in Western Kenya, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp. 283-298.[11057]

Nyamu-Musembi, Celestine (2002): Are local norms and practices fences or pathways? The example of women’s property rights, in: An-Na’im, Abdullahi (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London, pp. 126-150.[11058]

Nzioki, A. (2002): The effect of land tenure on women`s access and control of land in Kenya, in: An-Na’im, Abdullahi (ed.): Cultural transformation and human rights in Africa, Zed Books, London.[11059]

Okeyo, Pala Achola (1980): Daughters of the lakes and rivers: Colonization and land rights of Luo women, in: Etienne, Mona / Leacock, Eleanor (eds.): Women and colonization, Praeger Publishers, New York, pp. 186-213.[11060]

Okeyo, Pala Achola (1980): The Joluo equation - Land reforms lower status for women, in: Ceres, 13, 3, pp. 37-42.[11061]

Okeyo, Pala Achola (1983): Women’s access to land and their role in decision-making, Experiences from Kenya, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, no. 13, pp. 69-87.[11062]

Okoth-Ogendo, H.W.O. (1975): The changing system of land tenure and the rights of women, in: Pala, Achola (ed.): The participation of women in Kenya society, Kenya Literature Bureau, Nairobi, pp. 132-139.[11063]

Omale, Juliana (2000): Tested to their limit, Sexual harrassment in schools and educational institutions in Kenya, in: Mirsky, Judith / Radlett, Marty (eds.): No paradise yet, The world’s women face the new century, Zed Books, London.[11064]

Pala, A.O. (1983): Women’s access to land and their role in agriculture and decision-making, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 13, pp. 69-85.[11065]

Salim, Ahmed (1990): Conflict between common law and customary law in Kenya, Regarding burial rights, in: in: Abun-Nasr, Jamil / Spellenberg, Ulrich / Wanitzek, Ulrike (eds.): Law, society, and national identity in Africa, Helmut Buske Verlag, Hamburg, pp. 133-138.[11066]

Schuhmann, Ralph (1991): Interne Kollisionsnorm und traditionelles Recht im Spannungsfeld des kulturellen Wandels, The case of Otieno, in: Verfassung und Recht in Übersee, 24, 3, pp. 245-270.[11067]

Schuhmann, Ralph (1991): Interne Kollisionsnorm und traditionelles Recht im Spannungsfeld des kulturellen Wandels, The case of Otieno, in: Verfassung und Recht in Übersee, 24, 3, pp. 245-270.[11072]

Shadle, Brett (1999): Changing traditions to meet current altering conditions: Customary law, African courts, and the rejection of codification in Kenya, 1930-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, pp. 411-431.[11068]

Shadle, Brett (2003): Bridewealth and female consent, Marriage disputes in African courts, Gusiiland, Kenya, in: Journal of African History, vol. 44, pp. 241-262.[11069]

Shadle, Brett (2006): Girls cases, Marriage and colonialism in Kenya, 1890-1970, Heinemann,Oxford.[11070]

Shadle, Brett (2008): Rape in the courts of Gusiiland, Kenya, 1940s-1960s, in: African Studies Review, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 27-50.[11071]

Stamp, Patricia (1991): Burying Otieno: The politics of gender and ethnicity in Kenya, in: Signs, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 808-848.[11073]

White, Luise (1990): Body fluids an usufruct, Controlling property in Nairobi, 1917-1939, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 418-438.[11074]

Whyte, Raynolds Susan (1990): The widow’s dream: Sex and death in Western Kenya, in: Jackson, M. / Karp, I. (eds.): Personhood and agency, The experience of self and other in African cultures, Publications of the African Studies Centre, Uppsala, pp. 95-114.[11077]

Wipper, Audrey (1971): Equal rights for women in Kenya, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, 9. 3, pp. 429-438.[11078]

Wölte, Sonja (2002): Von lokal nach international und zurück, Gewalt gegen Frauen und internationale Menschenrechtspolitik, in: Dackweiler, Regina-Maria / Schäfer, Reinhild (Hrsg.): Gewaltverhältnisse, Feministische Perspektiven auf Geschlecht und Gewalt, Campus Verlag, Frankfurt, pp. 221-248.[11075]

Wölte, Sonja (2003): Claiming women’s rights and contesting spaces, Women’s movements and the International Women’s Human Rights discourse in Africa, in: Braig, Marianne / Wölte, Sonja (eds.): Common grounds or mutual exclusion? Women’s movements and international perspectives, Zed Books, London, pp. 171-188.[11076]

society - families marriages

Adams, Bert / Mburugu, Edward (1994): Kikuyu bridewealth and polygyny today, in: Journal of Comparative Family Studies, vol. 25, pp. 159-166.[8681]

Best, Günther (1982): Zum Wandel der Endogamie und Exogamie zweier Nomadengruppen in Ost- und Westafrika: Turkana und Fulbe, in: Anthropos, 77, pp. 264-269.[8682]

Cronk, Lee (1990): Stratification, bridewealth, and marriage patterns among the Mukogodo and their neighbors, Laikipia District, Kenya, in: Research in Economic Anthropology, vol. 12, pp. 89-109.[8683]

Curtin, Patricia Romero (1984): Weddings in Lamu, Kenya, An example of social and economic change, in: Cahiers d’ Etudes Africaines, 94, 24, pp. 131-145.[8684]

Geissler, Wenzel P. / Prince, Ruth (2004): Shared lives, Exploring practices of amity between grandmothers and grandchildren in western Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 74, no. 1, pp. 95-108.[8685]

Gwako, Edwin Laban Moogi (1997): Married women’s ideal family size preferences and family planning practices, Evidence from rural Kenya, in: Social Science Journal, vol. 34, pp. 369-382.[8686]

Gwako, Edwin Laban Moogi (1998): Widow inheritance among the Maragoli of Western Kenya, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 54, pp. 173-198.[8687]

Gwako, Edwin Laban Moogi (1998): Polygyny among the Logoli of Western Kenya, in: Anthropos, no. 93, pp. 331-348.[8688]

Hakansson, Thomas (1988): Bridewealth, Women and land, Social change among the Gusii of Kenya, Almqvist and Wiksell, Uppsala.[8689]

Hakansson, Thomas (1994): The detachability of women, Gender and kinship in processes of socio-economic change among the Gusii of Kenya, in: American Ethnologist, 21, pp. 516-538.[8690]

Hakansson, Thomas / Le Vine, Robert (1997): Gender and life courses strategies among the Gusii, in: Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport, pp. 253-267.[8691]

Hetherington, Penelope (2001): Generational changes in marriage pattern in the Central Province of Kenya, 1930-1990, in: Journal of African and Asian Studies, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 163-179.[8692]

Jensen, An-Margritt (1991): Economic change, marriage and fertility in a rural area of Kenya, in: Stolen, Kristi Ann / Yaa, Mariken (eds.): Gender and change in developing countries, Oslo, pp. 67-88.[8693]

Le Vine, Sarah (1979): Mothers and wives, Gusii women of East Africa, Chicago.[8694]

Mayambala, Ester (1996): Changing the terms of the debate: Polygamy and the rights of women in Kenya and Uganda, in: East African Journal of Peace and Human Rights, 3, 2, pp. 200–238.[8695]

Mutongi, Kenda (1999): Worries of the heart: Widowed mothers, daughters and masculinities in Maragoli, Western Kenya, 1950-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 67-86.[8696]

Mutongi, Kenda (2007): Worries at heart, Widows, family and community in Kenya, Chicago University Press, Chicago.[8697]

Njambi, Wairimu / O’Brien, William (2000): Revisiting „woman-woman-marrige“, Notes on Gikuyu women, in: National Women’s Studies Journal, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-23.[8699]

Nyambedha, Erick Otieno / Aagaard-Hansen, Jens (2007): Practices of relatedness and the re-invention of duol as a network of care for orphans and widows in Western Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 77, no. 4.[8698]

Paolisso, Michael / Braksh, Michael / Thomas, Conley (1989): Women’s agricultural work, child care and infant diarrhea in rural Kenya, in: Leslie, Joanne / Paolisso, Michael (eds.): Women, work, and child welfare in the third world, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 217-236.[8700]

Parkin, David (1995): Disputing human passion, The negotiation of the meaning of love among the Giriama of Kenya, in: Caplan, Pat (ed.): Understanding disputes, The politics of argument, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp. 161-180.[8701]

Potash, Betty (1978): Some aspects of marital instability in a rural Luo community, in: Africa, 48, 4, pp. 380-397.[8702]

Potash, Betty (1986): Wives of the grave, Widows in rural Luo community, in: Pottash, Betty (ed.): Widows in African societies, Choises and constraints, Stanford University Press, Stanford, pp. 44-65.[8703]

Reynolds Whyte (1979): Wives and co-wives in Marachi, Kenya, in: Folk, 21-22, pp. 134-144.[8704]

Shadle, Brett (2003): Bridewealth and female consent, Marriage disputes in African courts, Gusiiland, Kenya, in: Journal of African History, vol. 44, pp. 241-262.[8705]

Shadle, Brett (2006): Girls cases, Marriage and colonialism in Kenya, 1890-1970, Heinemann,Oxford.[8706]

Smith Oboler, Regina (1980): Is a female husband a man? Women/women marriage among the Nandi of Kenya, in: Ethnology, 19, pp. 69-88.[8707]

Swartz, Marc (1982): The isolation of men and the happiness of women, Sources and uses of power in Swahili marital relations, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 38, pp. 26-44.[8708]

Tietmeyer, Elisabeth (1985): Frauen heiraten Frauen, Eine vergleichende Studie zur Gynaegamie in Afrika, Klaus Renner Verlag, Hohenschäftlarn.[8709]

Tietmeyer, Elisabeth (1991): Gynaegamie im Wandel, Lit-Verlag, Münster.[8710]

Weisner, Thomas / Bradley, Candice / Kilbride, Philip (eds.) (1997): African families and the crisis of social change, Bergin and Garvey Publishers, Westport.[8711]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

Johnstone, Lyn (2021): Queer worldmaking in Wanuri Kahiu’s Film Rafiki, in: Journal of African Cultural Studies, vol. 33, issue 1, pp.39-50.[11812]

Murray, Stephen / Roscoe, Will (eds.) (1998): Boy wives and female husbands, Studies in African homosexualities, St. Martin’s Press, New York.[9041]

Mwangi, Evan (1998): Queer agency in Kenya’s digital media, in: African Studies Review, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 93-113.[9042]

Mwangi, Evan (2014): Queer agency in Kenya’s digital media, in: African Studies Review, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 93-113. [11701]

Okali, Dancun / Otieno, Frederick / Nyikuri, Mary et al. (2013): Men who have sex with men in Kisumu, Kenya, Support group membership and knowledge of Hiv-risk factors, in: Culture, Health and Sexuality, vol. 15, no. 7/8, pp. 968-980. [9043]

Shepherd, Gill (1987): Rank, gender, and homosexuality, Mombasa as a key to understand sexual options, in: Caplan, Pat (ed.): The cultural construction of sexuality, Routledge, London, pp. 240-270.[9044]

Sponk, Rachel (2018): Invisible desires in Ghana and Kenya, Same-sex erotic experience in cross-sex oriented lives, in: Sexualities, vol. 21, no. 5-6, pp. 883-898.[9045]

Sponk, Rachel (2017): Invisible desires in Ghana and Kenya, in: Sexualities, vol. 21, no. 7, pp. 883-898 [11700]

Thirikwa, Jane Wothaya (2018): Emergent momentum for equality, LGBTI visibility and organising in Kenya, in: Mbaru, Monica / Tabengwa, Monica / Vance, Kim (eds.): Envisioning global LGBT human rights: (Neo)colonialim, neoliberalism, resistance and hope, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, pp. 307-322. [9046]

Van Klinken, Adriaan (2019): Kenyan, Christian, Queer, Religion, LGBTI activism, and arts of resistance in Africa, Penn State University Press, University Park.[9047]

society - masculinities

Dodoo, F.N. (1998): Men matter, Additive and interactive gender preferences, amd reproductive behaviour in Kenya, in: Demography, 359, 2, pp. 229-242.[9255]

Dodoo, F.N. / Ampofo, Adomako A. et al. (2001): AIDS related knowledge and behaviour among married Kenyan men, A behavioral paradox? in: Journal of Health and Human Services Administration, vol. 24, no. 2, pp. 197-231.[9256]

Edgerton, Robert / Conant, Frances (1964): Kilapat, The “shaming party” among the Pokot of East Africa, in: South Western Journal of Anthropology, 20, pp. 404-418.[9257]

Heald, Suzette (1995): The power of sex, Some reflections on the Caldwell’s African sexuality thesis, in: Africa, 65, 4, pp. 489-505.[9258]

Hodgson, Dorothy (1999): „Once intrepid warriors“: Modernity and the production of Maasai masculinities, in: Ethnology, vol. 38, no. 2, pp. 121-150..[9259]

Hodgson, Dorothy (1999): Engendered encounters, Men of the church and the „church“ of women in Maasailand, Tanzania, 1950-1993, in: Comparative Studies in Society and History, 41, 4, pp. 758-783.[9260]

Jones, Adam (ed.) (2006): Men of the global South, A reader, Zed Books, London.[9261]

Kiama, W. (1999): Men who have sex with men in Kenya, in: Foreman, M. (ed.): AIDS and men, Zed Books, London.[9262]

Kim, Young / Kols, Adrienne / Awasum, D. (2000): Differences in counseling men and women: Family planning in Kenya, in: Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 39, pp. 37-47.[9263]

Lamphear, John (1998): Brothers in arms, Military aspects of East African age-class systems in historical perspective, in: Kurimoto, Eisei / Simonse, Simon (eds.): Conflict, age and power in North-East Africa, Age systems in transtition, James Currey, Oxford, pp. 79-97.[9264]

Longfield, Kim / Glieck, Anne / Berman, John (2004): Relationships between older men and younger women, Implications for STD/HIV in Kenya, in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 125-134.[9265]

Mutongi, Kenda (1999): Worries of the heart: Widowed mothers, daughters and masculinities in Maragoli, Western Kenya, 1950-1960, in: Journal of African History, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 67-86.[9266]

Ntarangwi, Mwenda (1998): Feminism and masculinity in an African capitalist context, The case of Kenya, in: Safere, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 19-32.[9267]

Ntarangwi, Mwenda (2003): Gender, identity and performance, Understanding Swahili cultural realities through song, Africa World Press, Trenton.[9268]

Nzioka, C. (2001): Perspectives of adolescent boys on the risks of unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, Kenya, in: Reproductive Health Matters, 9, 17, pp. 108-117.[9269]

Odame, Hambly Helen (2002): Men in women’s groups, A gender and agency analyis of local institutions, in: Kimmel, Michael (ed.): Masculinities matter! Men, gender and development, Zed Books, London, pp. 138-165.[9270]

Silberschmidt, Margrethe (1991): Rethinking men and gender relations. An investigation of men, their changing roles within the household, and the implications for gender relations in Kisii District, Kenya, Centre for Development Research, CDR Research Report 16, Copenhagen.[9271]

Silberschmidt, Margrethe (1992): Have men become weaker? Changes of life situations in Kisii District, Kenya, in: Journal of Modern African Studies, vol. 30, no. 2, pp. 237-253.[9272]

Silberschmidt, Margrethe (1999): Women forget that men are the masters, Gender antagonism and socio-economic change in Kisii District, Kenya, Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala.[9273]

Silberschmidt, Margrethe (2001): Disempowerment of men in rural and urban East Africa, Implications for male identity and sexual behaviour, in: World Development, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 657-671.[9274]

Silberschmidt, Margrethe (2005): Poverty, male disempowerment, and male sexuality, in: Ouzgane, Lahoucine / Morrell, Robert (eds.): African masculinities, Men in Africa from the nineteenth century to the present, Palgrave MacMillan, New York, pp. 189-203.[9275]

Swartz, Marc (1982): The isolation of men and the happiness of women, Sources and uses of power in Swahili marital relations, in: Journal of Anthropological Research, vol. 38, pp. 26-44.[9276]

Van Stapele, Naiomi (2021): Providing to belong, Masculinities, hustling and economic uncertainty in Nairobi ‘ghetttos’, in: Africa, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 57-76.[11679]

White, L. (1990): Separating the men from the boys, Constructing gender, sexuality and terrorism in central Kenya, 1939-1959, in: International Journal of African Historical Studies, 23,4, pp. 1-25.[9278]

Wood, John Colman (1999): Where men are women: Manhood among the Gabra Nomads of East Africa, Madison, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison.[9277]

society - migration and urbanisation

Boelaert, M. / Vautier, F. / Dusauchoit, T. et al. (1999): The relevance of gendered approaches to refugee health, A case study in Hagadera, Kenya, in: Indra, Doreen (ed.): Engendering forced migration, Theory and practice, Berghahn Books, New York, pp. 165-175.[9663]

Dellantonio, Johanna (2005): “In Nairobi I have my house, upcountry I have my house” – Berufstätige Frauen zwischen Land und Stadt in Kenia, in: Stichproben, Wiener Zeitschrift für krititsche Afrikastudien, nr. 9, 5. Jg., pp. 23-36.[9664]

Francis, Elizabeth (1995): Migration and changing division of labour, Gender relations and economic change in Koguta, Western Kenya, in: Africa, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 196-216.[9665]

Malombe, Joyce (1996): Women`s groups and shelter improvement in Kenya, in: Schlyter, Ann (ed.): A place to live, Gender research on housing in Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp. 160-169.[9666]

Nimpuno-Parente, Paula (1987): The struggle for shelter: women in a site and service project in Nairobi, Kenya, In: Moser, Caroline / Peake, Linda (eds.): Women, human settlements, and housing, Tavistock, London, pp. 70-87.[9667]

Silberschmidt, Margarethe (2001): Disempowerment of men in rural and urban East Africa, Implications for male identity and sexual behaviour, in: World Development, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 657-671.[9668]

Swart, Elizabeth (2017): Women´s voices from the margins, Diaries from Kibera, Kenya, Women´s Press, Toronto.[11853]

Tahani, Veena (1978): Women in Nairobi, The paradox of urban progess, African Urban Studies, 3, pp. 67-83.[9669]

Vorlaufer, Karl (1985): Frauen-Migration und sozialer Wandel in Afrika, das Beispiel Kenia, in: Erdkunde, Bd. 39, pp. 128-143.[9670]

Were, Miriam / Mcadoo, Hariette (1987): Extended family involvement and roles of urban Kenyan women, in: Harley, Sharon / Terborg-Penn, Rosalyn / Rushing, Andrea (eds.): Women in Africa and the African diaspora, Howard University Press, Washington, pp. 133-164.[9671]

White, Luise (1987): Vice and vagrants, Prostitution, housing and casual labour in Nairobi in the mid 1930s, in: Snyder, Francis / Hay, Douglas (eds.): Struggle for the city, Migrant labour, capital and the state in urban Africa, Sage Publications, London, pp. 165-191.[9672]

White, Luise (1990): Body fluids and usufruct, Controlling property in Nairobi, 1917-1939, in: Canadian Journal of African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 418-438.[9673]

Zulu, Eliya M. / Dodoo, F. Nii-Amoo / Ezeh, Alex (2002): Sexual risk-taking in the slums of Nairobi, Kenya, 1993-1998, in: Population Studies, vol. 56.[9674]

Zulu, Msiyaphazi Eliya / Dodoo, Nii-Amoo, F. / Ezah, Chika Alex (2004): Urbanization, poverty and sex, Roots of risky sexual behaviour in slum settlements in Nairobi, Kenya, in: Kalipeni, Ezekiel / Craddock, Susan et al. (eds.): HIV & AIDS in Africa, Beyond epidemiology, Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, pp. 167-174.[9675]

society - women's organisations

Abwunza, Judith (1995): Silika, To make our lives shine, women’s groups in Maragoli, Kenya, in: Anthropologica, vol. 37, pp.27-48.[9956]

Barrett, Minna (1987): Women’s income generating initiatives in Kenya: Self-report perceptions of the needs and the value of women’s groups, in: African Urban Quarterly, vol. 2, no. 4, pp.435-442.[9957]

Bülow, Dorothee von (1990): Women's organizations and changing gender relations among the Kipsigis of Kenya, Centre for Development Research, Working Paper 90.5, Kopenhagen. [9958]

Chitere, Preston (1988): The women’s movement in Kenya: A historical perspective, 1940-1980, in: Transafrican Journal of History, vol. 17, pp.50-68.[9959]

Feldman, Rayah (1984): Women's groups and women's subordination: An analysis of policies towards rural women in Kenya, in: Review of African Political Economy, vol. 27, pp.67-85. [9960]

House-Midamba, Bessie (1996): Gender, democratisation and associational life in Kenya, in: Africa Today, vol. 43, no. 3, pp.289-306. (and published in: Young, Tom (ed.): Readings in African politics, James Currey, Oxford, 2003).[9961]

Kayongo-Male, Diane (1983): Helping self-help groups to help themselves, Training of leaders in women’s groups, in: Journal of Eastern African Research and Development, vol. 13, pp.88-103.[9964]

Komma, Toru (1984): The women’s self-help association movement among the Kipsigis of Kenya, in: Senri Ethnological Studies, vol. 15, pp.145-196.[9965]

Ludvardy, M.L. (1998): Theorizing past and present women’s organizations in Kenya, in: World Development, vol. 26, no. 9, pp.1749-1761.[9962]

Lutomia, Anna Namatsi / Sanya, Nyandiko Brenda / Rombo, Dorothy Owino (2016): Examining and contextualising Kenya’s Mandeleo ya Wanawake Organisation (MYWO), in: Lange, C. / Nakagawa, S. / Onyx, J. / Schwabenland, C. (eds.): Women’s emancipation and civil society organisations, Challenging or mainstreaming the status quo? Polity Press, Bristol, pp. 321-341.[9963]

Maas, Maria (1986): It is always good to have land, Women’s groups in Kiambu, Kenya, African Studies Centre, Research Report, No. 26, Leiden.[9966]

Maathai, Wangari (1985): Kenya: The Green Belt Movement, in: IFDA Dossier, 49, pp.3-12.[9967]

Maathai, Wangari (1995): Women, information, and the future: The women of Kenya and the Green Belt Movement, in: Brill, Alida (ed.): A rising public voice: Women in politics worldwide, Feminist Press at the City University of New York, New York, pp. 241-250.[9968]

Maathai, Wangari (2003): The Geen Belt Movement, Deep Books, London.[9969]

Malombe, Joyce (1996): Women’s groups and shelter improvement in Kenya, in: Schlyter, Ann (ed.): A place to live, Gender research on housing in Africa, Publications of the Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, pp.160-169.[9970]

Meyer-Mansor, Dorothee (1985): Frauenselbsthilfegruppen in Kenia, Institut für Afrika-Kunde, Hamburg.[9971]

Michaelson, M. (1994): Wangari Maathai and Kenya’s Green Belt Movement, Exploring the evolution and potentials of consensus movement mobilization, in: Social Problems, vol. 41, pp.540-561.[9972]

Muzaale, Patrick J. / Leonard, David K. (1985): Kenya's Experience with Women's Groups in Agricultural Extension: Strategies for Accelerating Improvements in Food Production and Nutritional Awareness in Africa, in: Agricultural Administration, vol. 19, pp.13-28. [9973]

Nelson, Nici (1996): The Kiambu group: A successful women’s ROSCAs in Mathare Valley, Nairobi (1971-1990), in: Ardener, Shirley / Burman, Sandra (eds.): Money go rounds, The importance of rotating saving and credit associations for women, Berg Publishers, Oxford, pp.49-70.[9974]

Nzomo, Maria (1998): Kenya, The women’s movement and democratic change, Villalón, Leonardo / Huxtable, Phillip (eds.): The African state at a critical juncture, Between disintegration and reconfiguration, Lynne Rienner Publishers, London, pp.167-184.[9975]

Odame, Helen Hambly (2002): Men in women’s groups, A gender and agency analysis of local institutions, in: Cleaver, Frances (ed.): Masculinities matter! Men, gender and development, Zed Books, London, pp.138-165.[9976]

Odul, Wilhelmina / Kabira, Wanjiku Mukabi (1995): The mother of warriors and her daughters: The women’s movement in Kenya, in: Basu, Amrita (ed.): Women’s movement in global perspective, Boulder, Westview Press, pp.187-208.[9977]

Ouko, Riria J.V.N. (1985): Women’s organizations in Kenya, in: Journal of Eastern African Research, vol. 15, pp.188-197.[9978]

Pala, A.O. / Wallis, M.H. / Reynolds, J.E. (1975): The women’s groups programme in the special rural development programme (SRDP), in: Pala, Achola / Awori, Thelma / Krystall, Abigail (eds.): The participation of women in Kenya society, Kenya Literature Bureau, Nairobi, pp.73-103.[9979]

Qaim, Martin (1999): Frauengruppen in der kenianischen Landwirtschaft, in: Entwicklung und ländlicher Raum, Nr. 2, pp.26-28.[9980]

Roy-Campbell, Makini Zaline (1996): Pan-African women organising for the future, The formation of the Pan African Women’s Liberation Organisation and beyond, in: African Journal of Political Science, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 45-57.[9981]

Saidi, K. (1988): Smallbusiness credit for Samburu women’s groups in Kenya, in: Rural Development in Practice, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 9-10.[9982]

Schäfer, Rita (1995): Frauenorganisationen und Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, Traditionelle und moderne Frauenzusammenschlüsse im interethnischen Vergleich, Centaurus Verlag, Pfaffenweiler/Herbholzheim.[9983]

Sorensen, Anne (1992): Women's organisations amongst the Kipsigis: Change, variety and different participation, in: Africa, vol. 62, no. 4, pp.547-566.[9984]

Stamp, Patricia (1986): Kikuyu women's self-help groups, Toward an understanding of the relation between sex-gender system and mode of production in Africa, in: Robertson, Claire / Berger, Iris (eds.): Women and class in Africa, Boulder, pp.27-46.[9985]

Staudt, Kathleen A. (1982): The Umoja Federation, The cooptation into a local power structure, in: Western Political Quarterly, 33, 2, pp.278-290.[9986]

Strobel, Margaret (1976): From Lelemama to lobbying: Women’s associations in Mombasa, in: Hafkin, Nancy / Bay, Edna (eds.): Women in Africa, Studies in Social and Economic Change, Stanford.[9987]

Tamale, Sylivia (2006): Taking the beast by its horns, Formal resistance to women’s oppression in Africa, in: Africa Development, vol. 21, no 4, pp. 5-21.[9988]

Tamale, Sylivia (2006): Think globally, act locally, Using international treties for women’s empowerment in East Africa, in: Agenda, no. 50, pp. 97-104.[9989]

Thomas, Barbara (1987): Development through Harambee: Who wins and who looses? Rural self-help projects in Kenya, in: World Development, vol. 15, no. 4, pp.463-481.[9990]

Thomas, Barbara (1988): Household coping strategies for adaptation and change: Participation in Kenyan rural women's associations, in: Africa, vol. 58, no. 4, pp.401-422.[9991]

Tripp, Alili Mari (1996): Urban women's movements and political liberalization in East Africa, in: Sheldon, Kathleen (ed.): Courtyards, markets, city streets, Urban women in Africa, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.285-308.[9992]

Tripp, Alili Mari (2001): Women’s movements and challenges to neo-patrimonial rule, Preliminary observations from Africa, in: Development and Change, vol. 32, no. 1, pp.33-54.[9993]

Udvary, Monica (1988): Women’s groups near the coast: Patron clientship in teh development area, in: Brokensha, David / Little, Peter (eds.): Anthropology of development and change in East Africa, Boulder, pp.217-235.[9994]

Udvary, Monica (1990): Bringing home development, The impetus of ideology for women’s groups near the Kenyan coast, in: Brokensha, W. (ed.): Social change and applied anthropology, Westview Press, Boulder, pp.182-196.[9995]

Wachtel, E. (1975): 76 A Farm for One's Own: The Rural Orientation of Women's Group Enterprises in Nakuru, Kenya, in: Rural Africana, no. 29, pp.69-81.[9996]

Wacker, Corinne (1991): Participatory Development Planning for Sustainable Development with Women's Groups in Kenya, in: Rodda, Annabel (ed.): Women and the Environment, Zed Books, London, pp.141-146.[9997]

Wacker, Corinne (1994): Sustainable development through women’s groups, A cultural approach to sustainable development, in: Harcourt, Wendy (ed.): Feminist perspective on sustainable development, Zed Books, London, pp.128-142.[9998]

Wamalwa, Betty (1991): Limits of Women's Groups as a Viable Channel for the Development of Women in Kenya, in: Wallace, Tine / March, Candida (eds.): Changing Perceptions, Writings on Gender and Development, Oxford, pp.245-252.[9999]

Wanyande, Peter (1987): Women’s groups in participatory development: Kenya’s development experience through the use of Harambee, in: Development, Seeds of Change, vol. 2/3, pp.94-102.[10000]

Wanyeki, Muthoni (2005): The African women’s development and communication network (FEMNET), Experiences of feminist organising, in: Feminist Africa, vol. 4, pp.105-115.[10001]

Wanyeki, Muthoni (2009): The African Women’s Development and Communication Network, Pan-African organizing in human rights in: Mutua, Makau (ed.): Human rights NGOs in East Africa, Political and normative tensions, Pennsylvania University Press, Pennsylvania, pp. 233-243.[10002]

Wichterich, Christa (1992): Moral, Markt, Macht - Frauengruppen in Kenia, in: Peripherie, Nr. 47/48, pp.7-21.[10003]

Wipper, Audrey (1973): The Maendeleo ya Wanawake Organization: The cooperation of leadership, in: African Studies Review, 17, 3.[10004]

Wipper, Audrey (1975): The Maendeleo ya wanawake movement in the colonial period: The Canadian connection, Mau Mau, embroidery and agriculture, in: Rural Africana, 21, pp.195-213.[10005]

Wipper, Audrey (1989): Kikuyu women and the Harry Thuku disturbances, Some uniformities of female militancy, in: Africa, 59,. 3, pp.300-337.[10006]

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