Literature Database on Gender in Subsahara Africa

Literature regarding Angola

agriculture ecology rural development climate changearts and cultureeconomy - formal and informal employment
economy - Householdseconomy - markets and traderseconomy - pastoralism
education schooling and tertiary educationhealth - fgc fgmhealth - HIV AIDS and gender
health - reproduction and fertilityhealth history colonialism and pre-colonial history
Literature media politics - wars violent conflicts
politics Religion - Christianity Religion - Islam
Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumshipRights - human rights violations gender based violence Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system
society - families marriagessociety - homosexuality / sexual minorities society - masculinities
society - migration and urbanisationsociety - women's organisations

agriculture ecology rural development climate change

no entries to this combination of country and topic

arts and culture

Moorman, Marissa (2004): Dueling bands and good girls, Gender, music, and nation in Luanda,’s Musseques, 1961-1974, in: The International Journal of African Historical Studies, vol. 37, no. 2, pp. 255-288.[1424]

Moorman, Marissa (2004): Putting on a pano and dancing like our grandparents: Nation and dress in late colonial Angola, in: Allman, Jean M. (ed.): Fashioning Africa: Power and the politics of dress, Indiana University Press, Bloomington, pp. 84-103.[1425]

economy - formal and informal employment

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - Households

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - markets and traders

no entries to this combination of country and topic

economy - pastoralism

no entries to this combination of country and topic

education schooling and tertiary education

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - fgc fgm

no entries to this combination of country and topic

health - HIV AIDS and gender

Flechner, David (2005): A human rights approach to protecting people living with HIV/AIDS in Angola, in: International Social Science Journal, no. 186, pp. 627-638.[3404]

health - reproduction and fertility

Agadjanian, Victor / Prata, Ndola (2001): War and reproduction, Angola’s fertility in comparative perspective, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 329-347.[4301]

Agadjanian, Victor / Prata, Ndola (2002): War, peace and fertility in Angola, in: Demography, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 215-231.[4302]

Blier, Preston Suzanne (1995): The path of the leopard, Motherhood and majesty in early Dahomey, in: Journal of African History, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 391-418.[4305]

Capo-Chichi, Vigile / Juarez, Fatima (2001): Is fertility declining in Benin? in: Studies in Family Planning, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 25-40.[4306]

Elisabeth Jangsten, Roland Strand, Engracia da Gloria Gomez de Freitas, Anna-Lena Hellström, Annika (2005): (Afr J Reprod Health 2005 2005, 9[3]:148-158) African Journal of Reproductive Health, Vol. 9, No. 3, 2005, pp. 148-158[4303]

Sargent, Carolyn (1986): Prospects for the professionalisation of indigenous midwifery in Benin, in: Last, Murray / Chavunduka, G.L. (eds.): The professionalisation of African Medicine, Mancester University Press, Manchester, pp. 137-149.[4307]

Sargent, Carolyn (1988): Born to die, Witchcraft and infanticide in Bariba culture, in: Ethnology, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 79-85.[4308]

Sargent, Carolyn (1989): Maternity, medicine and power, Reproductive decisions in urban Benin, University of California Press, Berkeley.[4309]

Sargent, Carolyn (1990): The politics of birth: Cultural dimensions of pain virtue and control among the Bariba of Benin, In: Handwerker, W. Penn (ed.): Births and power: Social change and the politics of reproduction, Westview Press, Boulder, pp. 69-79.[4310]

health

Carvalho, A. and Laudari, C. and Marini, M. and Faundes, A. (1996): Characteristics of contraceptive acceptors in Luanda, Angola, in: African Journal of Fertility, Sexuality and Reproductive Health, vol. 1, pp. 109-114.[5009]

Odberg Pettersson, Karen and Christensson et al. (2004): Adaptation of health care seeking behavior during childbirth: Focus group discussions with women living in the suburban areas of Luanda, Angola, in: Health Care for Women International, vol. 25, pp. 255-280.[5010]

Schaider, J. / Ngonyani, S. / Tomlin, S. / Rydman, R. / Roberts, R. (1999): International maternal mortality reduction: Outcome of traditional birth attendant education and intervention in Angola, in: Journal of Medical Systems, vol. 23, pp. 99-105.[5011]

history colonialism and pre-colonial history

Broadhead, Herlin Susan (1983): Slave wives, free sisters, Bakongo women and slavery c. 1700-1850, in: Robertson, Claire / Klein, Martin (eds.): Women and slavery in Africa, University of Wisconsin Press, Madison, pp. 160-181.[5158]

Miller, Joseph (1975): Nzinga of Matamba in a new perspective, in: Journal of African History, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 201-216.[5159]

Oliveira, Vanessa (2015): Gender, foodstuff production and trade in late-eighteenth century Luanda, in: Afrian Economic History, vol. 43, pp. 57-81.[5160]

Schwarz-Bart, Simone (2001): Ana de Sousa Nzinga: The Queen who resisted the Portuguese conquest, in: Schwarz-Bart, Simone (ed.): In praise of black women, Vol. 1: Ancient African Queens, University of Wisconsin Press, pp. 174-187.[5161]

Thornton, John K. (1991): Ideology and political power in Central Africa, The case of Queen Njinga (1624-1663), in: Journal of African History, vol. 32, pp. 25-40.[5162]

Thornton, John K. (1991): Legitimacy and political power: Queen Njinga, 1624-1663, in: Journal of African History, 32, pp. 25-40.[5163]

Thornton, John K. (1998): The Kongolese Saint Antony, Dona Beatriz Kimpa Vita and the Anthonian Movment, 1684-1706, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.[5164]

Thornton, John K. (2006): Elite women in the Kingdom of Kongo, Historical perspectives on women’s political power, in: Journal of African History, vol. 47, pp. 437-460.[5165]

Literature

Peres, Phyllis (2007): Women, bodies, and nation in Angolan poetry of the 1950s, in: Research in African Literatures, 38, 1, pp. 35-45.[5795]

media

no entries to this combination of country and topic

politics - wars violent conflicts

Agadjanian, Victor / Prata, Ndola (2001): War and reproduction, Angola’s fertility in comparative perspective, in: Journal of Southern African Studies, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 329-347.[6634]

Agadjanian, Victor / Prata, Ndola (2002): War, peace and fertility in Angola, in: Demography, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 215-231.[6635]

Anstee, Margaret (1994): Margaret Anstee: ‘Not very optomistic’ on Angola, in: Southern Africa Political and Economic Monthly, vol. 7, pp. 18-22.[6636]

Campbell, Horace (1999): The search for peace in Angola, The crucial role of women, I, in: Africa Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 1-40.[6637]

Campbell, Horace (1999): The search for peace in Angola, The crucial role of women II, in: Africa Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 105-140.[6638]

Crystal, Paul / Ehrlich, Lisa (2004): No product? No programme! The logistics of reproductive health supplies in conflict affected settings, in: Forced Migration Review, vol. 19, pp. 18-19.[6639]

Ducados, Henda (2000): An all men show? Angolan women`s survival in the 30-years war, in: Agenda, no. 43, pp. 11-22.[6640]

Ducados, Henda (2004): Angolan women in the aftermath of conflict, in: Accord: An International Review of Peace Initiatives, vol.15, pp.1-15.[6641]

El-Bushra, Judy (2003): Fused in combat, Gender relations and armed conflict, in: Development in Practice, vol. 13, no. 2-3, pp. 252-265.[6642]

El-Bushra, Judy / El-Karib, Asha / Hadjipateras, Angela (2002): Gender sensitive programme design and planning in conflict affected situations, Research Report, Annex 2: Angola Case Study, written by Marina da Souza and Tyiteta Areline, ACORD, London.[6643]

Human Rights Watch (2003): Struggling through peace, Return and resettlement in Angola, Human Rights Watch, vol. 15, no. 16, New York.[6644]

Jacobson, Ruth (2005): Gender, war, and peace in Mozambique and Angola: Advances and absences, in: Mazurana, Dyan E. / Raven-Roberts, Angela / Parpart, Jane L. (eds.): Gender, Conflict and Peacekeeping, Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, pp. 134-147.[6645]

Laudowicz, Edith (1987): Ich werde arbeiten und kämpfen, Frauen in Angola, in: Laudowicz, Edith (Hg.): Befreites Land – befreites Leben? Frauen in Befreiungsbewegungen und Revolutionen, Pahl-Rugenstein Verlag, Köln, pp. 57-93.[6646]

Nzatuzola, Jo Baptista Lukombo (2005): Gender and family life in Angola: Some aspects of the post-war conflict concerning displaced persons, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 106-133. [6647]

Organization of Angolan Women (1984): Angolan women building the future, From national liberation to women's emancipation, Zed Books, London.[6648]

Powles, Julia (2002): Refugee voices: Home and homelessness: The life history os Susanna Mwana-uta, an Angolan refugee, in: Journal of Refugee Studies, vol. 15, pp. 81-101.[6649]

Scott, Catherine (1994): „Men in our country behave like chiefs, Women and the Angolan revolution, in: Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and the revolution in Africa, Asia and the New World, University of California Press, Columbia, pp. 89-109.[6650]

Scott, Catherine (1995): Contradictions in the challenges to dependency: The roots of counter-revolution in Southern Africa, in: Scott, Catherine V. (ed.): Gender and development: Rethinking modernizaton and dependency theory, Lynne Rienner, Boulder/London, pp. 105-119.[6651]

Wilson, Zoe (2005): State making, Peacemaking, and the inscription of gendered politics into peace: Lessons from Angola, in: Mazurana, Dyan E. / Raven-Roberts, Angela / Parpart, Jane L. (eds.): Gender, conflict and peacekeeping, Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, pp. 232-264.[6652]

politics

Campbell, Horace (1993): Angolan women and the electoral process in Angola 1992, in: Africa Development, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 23-63.[7161]

Campbell, Horace (1998): Angolan women in search for peace, in: African Journal of Political Sciences, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 70-81.[7162]

Campbell, Horace (1999): The search for peace in Angola, The crucial role of women, in: Africa Quarterly, vol. 29, no. 2, pp. 105-140.[7163]

Organization of Angolan Women (1984): Angolan women building the future, From national liberation to women's emancipation, Zed Books, London.[7165]

Scott, Catherine (1994): “Men in our country behave like chiefs”, Tétreault, Mary Ann (ed.): Women and revolution in Africa, Asia and the new world, University of California Press, Berkeley, pp. 89-110.[7164]

Religion - Christianity

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - Islam

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Religion - traditional rituals and spirit mediumship

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Rights - human rights violations gender based violence

no entries to this combination of country and topic

Rights - Women Human Rights and legal system

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - families marriages

Hilton, Anne (1983): Family and kinship among the Congo south of the Zaire river from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, in: Journal of African Studies, vol. 24, pp. 189-206.[8584]

MacGaffey, Wyatt (1983): Lineage structures, marriage and the family among the central Bantu, in: Journal of African History, vol. 24, pp. 173-187.[8585]

Nzatuzola, Jo Baptista Lukombo (2005): Gender and family life in Angola: Some aspects of the post-war conflict concerning displaced persons, in: African Sociological Review, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 106-133. [8586]

society - homosexuality / sexual minorities

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - masculinities

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - migration and urbanisation

no entries to this combination of country and topic

society - women's organisations

Organization of Angolan Women (1984): Angolan women building the future, From national liberation to women's emancipation, Zed Books, London.[9932]

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